10th Annual Ohio Food Policy Summit + Ohio Local Food Council Workshop

Join the Ohio Food Policy Network (OFPN) and the John Glenn College of Public Affairs for the 10th Annual Ohio Food Policy Summit and Ohio Local Food Council Workshop, which is being held virtually this November

Ohio Food Policy Summit
Monday, November 16, 1-4 p.m. E.T.

• Keynote speaker Tom Philpott, author of Perilous Bounty: The Looming Collapse of American Farming and How We Can Prevent It
• Presentation of the OFPN draft policy framework and the opportunity to interact with the framework, setting the course of the OFPN policy agenda
• Presentation of the OFPN Food Hero award

Ohio Local Food Council Workshop
Tuesday, November 17, 4-6 p.m. E.T.

• This interactive workshop will prepare local food policy councils to operationalize their policy agendas
• Topics addressed include how to work within the law, steps in campaign building and tools to move forward

Follow this link to register.
Follow this link to join the Ohio Food Policy Network

 

Sourced from OFPN

What Does Equity in Smart Growth Really Mean?

Join the Smart Growth Network at 2:30 p.m. Friday, October 23, as Calvin Gladney, President and CEO of Smart Growth America and a national thought leader on equitable and sustainable community revitalization, and Andre Perry of the Brookings Institution and author of Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities meet in a virtual forum to discuss smart growth’s past, present, and future. Gladney and Perry will examine the current state of built environments and the policies that have historically affected the lives of people of color and look to the future to explore the potential for positive change. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Smart Growth Online

Ohio State Digital Accessibility Skills Training Curricula

Learn to develop accessible digital products through Digital Accessibility Skills Training now available in BuckeyeLearn. Courses include accessibility training for documents, PDFs, presentations, websites, and more. Enhance your accessibility expertise and take a course today. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: IT @ OSU

The University of Chicago Hosts Second Annual Urban October

This month marks the second annual Urban October at the University of Chicago, a monthlong initiative that highlights policy leaders, public officials, and leading researchers from Chicago and around the world who are confronting the most profound challenges facing global cities.

Such urban challenges have only increased in 2020. The basic infrastructure of global cities—including public transportation, densely populated office and residential districts, and overburdened public health systems—have made them especially vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic. Wildfires in California have worsened air quality for millions of residents on the West Coast. A summer of public reckoning on racial justice and policing in major American cities has resulted in mass demonstrations in the streets. Meanwhile, climate change is expected to prompt population shifts in the United States and abroad, widening the gulf between the rich and the poor and accelerating urbanization. Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: UChicago News

The Two Sides of Participation in Urban Food Policy

In many countries around the globe, urban food policies were born in an era of increased public participation in local policymaking. However, food raises specific questions when it comes to participation. Indeed, how do you foster participation around a topic that is new to local actors? An article published in Politics and Governance analyses participation at the onset of local food policy in the city of Ede, in the Netherlands. Researchers looked at the way local civil servants in charge of developing food policy viewed both their role and that of non-governmental actors. They unveiled a tension between two very different ways to see what participation is about. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Urban Food Futures

Introducing a Spatial Equity Data Tool

Data-driven decisionmaking in city government has expanded rapidly in recent years, driven by advances in technology and the digitization of many city services. The Urban Institute applauds the growth of data-driven decisionmaking, but they also recognize there are real concerns about the potential for bias in data used to guide public decisions. Left unchecked, unrepresentative data can directly lead to inequitable policy outcomes that harm vulnerable groups.

For example, many public works departments have started using citizen complaint data, like 311 requests, to allocate scarce city resources to perform sidewalk repairs and fix potholes. On the surface, this may seem like a way to make governments more responsive to citizen needs. The problem is that citizen complaint systems are more likely to be used by certain demographic groups, namely white residents, highly educated residents, and high-income residents. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Data@Urban

Employment Opportunity: OSU Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, Summit County, Ohio

The 4-H Positive Youth Development Educator works collaboratively with county and state teams and with local agency leaders and volunteers. This includes implementing and supporting a comprehensive volunteer system through identification, selection, orientation, training, utilizing, recognizing, and evaluating of adult and youth volunteers to support local 4-H delivery methods (e.g. community clubs, after-schools clubs, camps, school enrichment, etc.). Responsible for a broad range of basic to complex duties that could include, but are not limited to, maintaining relationships with 4-H club and committee members, providing guidance and/or leadership for 4-H Youth Development programming targeted to local and regional needs, and engaging youth to build leadership, citizenship, and life skills. Utilize appropriate methods both formal and informal, of community assessment to identify educational needs and opportunities of local community. Design, implement, and teach educational programming, based on these needs, to groups and individuals comprised of adults and/or youth.  Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Jobs at OSU

Green Stormwater Infrastructure Series

Many American communities have realized considerable financial and water quality gains by incorporating green infrastructure strategies for reducing and managing stormwater. The same green infrastructure that helps manage urban stormwater and improves water quality provides a wealth of other benefits to our communities including reducing urban heat island effects, providing evaporative cooling and shade, improve air quality by removing pollutants, human health benefits, and tangible economic benefits such as increase property values and green jobs.

Join Penn State Extension for this Green Storwmater Infrastructure Webinar Series to learn how research and work across Pennsylvania are providing cost effective approaches to managing stormwater. Explore how to properly prepare soils, select appropriate vegetation, plant, and maintain green stormwater infrastructure systems. The series begins this month. Follow this link to learn more.

To learn about Ohio State’s Stormwater Management Efforts, you can contact Dr. Ryan Winston, or  follow this link.