Employment Opportunity: OSU Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, Summit County, Ohio

The 4-H Positive Youth Development Educator works collaboratively with county and state teams and with local agency leaders and volunteers. This includes implementing and supporting a comprehensive volunteer system through identification, selection, orientation, training, utilizing, recognizing, and evaluating of adult and youth volunteers to support local 4-H delivery methods (e.g. community clubs, after-schools clubs, camps, school enrichment, etc.). Responsible for a broad range of basic to complex duties that could include, but are not limited to, maintaining relationships with 4-H club and committee members, providing guidance and/or leadership for 4-H Youth Development programming targeted to local and regional needs, and engaging youth to build leadership, citizenship, and life skills. Utilize appropriate methods both formal and informal, of community assessment to identify educational needs and opportunities of local community. Design, implement, and teach educational programming, based on these needs, to groups and individuals comprised of adults and/or youth.  Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Jobs at OSU

Green Stormwater Infrastructure Series

Many American communities have realized considerable financial and water quality gains by incorporating green infrastructure strategies for reducing and managing stormwater. The same green infrastructure that helps manage urban stormwater and improves water quality provides a wealth of other benefits to our communities including reducing urban heat island effects, providing evaporative cooling and shade, improve air quality by removing pollutants, human health benefits, and tangible economic benefits such as increase property values and green jobs.

Join Penn State Extension for this Green Storwmater Infrastructure Webinar Series to learn how research and work across Pennsylvania are providing cost effective approaches to managing stormwater. Explore how to properly prepare soils, select appropriate vegetation, plant, and maintain green stormwater infrastructure systems. The series begins this month. Follow this link to learn more.

To learn about Ohio State’s Stormwater Management Efforts, you can contact Dr. Ryan Winston, or  follow this link.

Urban October

Urban October is an opportunity for everyone to be part of the conversation about the challenges and opportunities created by the fast rate of change in our cities and towns. Each October, everyone interested in sustainable urbanization from national and local governments to universities, NGOs and communities is encouraged to hold or participate in activities, events, and discussions.

The month began with World Habitat Day on October 5 and will end with World Cities Day on October 31.

This year’s World Habitat Day global observance was held virtually, and was hosted by the city of Surabaya, in Indonesia while other celebrations of World Habitat Day were held round the globe using the theme Housing For All: A Better Urban Future.

World Cities Day 2020 is the seventh global celebration since it was launched on October 31, 2014 in Shanghai, China. The theme is Better City, Better Life and the sub-theme for this year is Valuing our communities and cities, and the Global Observance will be hosted in Nakuru, Kenya.

Today 55% of the world’s population live in cities and towns and the number is growing every day. The United Nation’s Agenda for Sustainable Development, and Sustainable Development Goal 11 “to make cities inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable” puts sustainable urbanization at the center of the global agendas for development. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: UN-Habitat

The Impact of COVID-19 on Federal, State, and Local Budgets – Panel Discussion

The Impact of COVID-19 on Federal, State, and Local Budgets will be the sixth in a series of events on “Cities and Regions in the Post-Coronavirus Era,” initiating community conversations on what lessons we can learn from this crisis to create a more resilient and sustainable world. How much have federal, state, and local budgets been (or will be) impacted by COVID-19 and what will the implications of this impact mean going forward for communities? Did we learn anything from the Great Recession of 2008 that has helped or will help us during this financial crisis? This discussion with be moderated by Harvey Miller, and is taking place on Friday, October 23, 2020 from 12-1 p.m. ET. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: CURA

Register for the 2021 Leadership in the City Course

Are you interested in Extension in urban areas and ready to improve your knowledge, skills, and results?

The Leadership in the City course will help you learn about leadership, networks, innovation, and management. The 5-month online program will prepare you, as an Extension professional, to be relevant locally, responsive statewide, and recognized nationally.

The goal of this comprehensive professional development program is to improve the knowledge, skills, and results of university Extension professionals working in large cities. You will connect with peers from around the country to engage in critical thinking and creative problem solving to become better prepared to be relevant locally, responsive statewide, and recognized nationally.

The program was developed based on a foundation of entrepreneurial theory and urban Extension practice and will build upon existing leadership experiences, management training, and Extension professional development.

You will learn from experienced leaders; apply what you learn in your city, region, or state; engage in critical thinking and creative problem solving; and participate in online collaborative learning. Each competency-based module incorporates interactive digital delivery and the flipped classroom model for active learning and engagement.

Upon completion of the course, you will be better prepared to:

  • Evaluate, illustrate, and build upon their four dimensions as an entrepreneurial leader (traits and drivers; competencies and experiences).
  • Navigate as a leader working in the urban and university contexts.
  • Implement elements of entrepreneurial organizations.

The investment in the program is $500 plus a commitment to work hard and have fun investing 8-14 hours per month. The 5-month online course begins in January 2021. If you have multiple participants from the same institute, you are each entitled to a $100 discount (Promotion code: LITC21-MULT).

This course is led by Dr. Julie Fox from the Ohio State University Extension.

Complete details and registration information can be found at https://cityextension.osu.edu/leadership. The deadline for registration is November 30.

Oh, Deer: How to Keep Your Yard from Becoming a Buffet

The Ohio Department of Natural Resource Division of Wildlife is accustomed to fielding complaints about nuisance deer, especially in urban areas. With the coronavirus pandemic keeping folks at home, more people are planting gardens for the first time. Someone new to the game might not know how to handle a hungry four-legged visitor, said Geoff Westerfield, a wildlife biologist with ODNR.  Stark County’s deer population tends to be stable in rural areas, such as Minerva, and growing in more urban areas. In rural areas, ODNR can adjust hunting regulations to help keep populations in check. In cities, that’s not typically an option, and without control, populations will grow, he said. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Canton Repository

Assessing Racial Equity in Organizational Culture

Join Kirwan Research Associate Kip Holley on Thursday, September 24, 2020 at 11 a.m. as he hosts a forum on assessing and cultivating racial equity in organizational culture. Follow this link to register.

Sourced from: The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity

More Than a Token: Urban Agriculture Has Much to Offer Close to Home

Jodi Kushins, of Over the Fence Urban Farm, knows she doesn’t grow a lot compared to some farms. She feeds about 20 households through her CSA program, with 2,500 square feet in her yard and her neighbor’s yard. “It’s like a drop in the bucket,” she said. “Seeing a semi truck full of produce and then thinking about the very, very tiny amount of food I’m able to produce in my yard definitely gives me pause.”

Kushin’s farm is one of more than 30 in Columbus, up from about five in 2014. Urban agriculture is driven by desires for food security and fresh foods, vacant land in post-industrial areas and interest in connecting with farmers, said Mike Hogan,  Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Franklin County. “We know we’re not gonna feed the world with urban agriculture,” Hogan said. But Hogan believes that urban agriculture needs to be part of the city food systems. In Cleveland, about 80% of the vacant land could provide 20% of all the produce needed. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Farm and Dairy