It’s All About Time – Spring Email Wellness Challenge Invitation

Spring Email Wellness Challenge April 6 – May 18, 2020

Sign up for the Ohio State University Extension, Live Healthy Live Well 6-week Email Wellness Challenge. Two weekly e-mails will be sent directly to you from an OSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Professional.

During this six-week challenge you will consider ways that “time” affects your life. You will be encouraged to fill your plate ½ full of vegetables & fruits for two meals each day. For activity, you will aim for 30 minutes of movement at least five times a week. You will focus on strategies to improve sleep. You will also explore ways to enhance your work/life balance and enjoy more “me” time.

You will learn tips and strategies to help you utilize time management tips to reduce stress in your life. By practicing wellness habits over the 6-week challenge, you will begin strengthening positive lifestyle behaviors. During this challenge, you will gain ideas to help you:

  1. Manage Time Constraints
  2. Enjoy Mealtime with Family
  3. Enhance Sleep
  4. Find Time and New Ways to Connect with Family and/or Friends
  5. Fit Creative Time into your Life
  6. Reduce Screen Time
  7. Focus on Work/Life Balance
  8. Eat more Vegetables and Fruits
  9. Add more Movement your Day

What does it cost? Nothing – it is free!

Who can participate? Any adult with an email account.

How do I sign up? Look at this chart and find your county. Go to the link listed beside your county and register.

Allen                  go.osu.edu/aphsp20

Belmont             go.osu.edu/belmontsp20

Butler                 go.osu.edu/butlersp20

Carroll                go.osu.edu/carrollsp20

Champaign         go.osu.edu/champsp20

Clark                  go.osu.edu/clarksp20

Clermont            go.osu.edu/clerhamsp20

Cuyahoga           go.osu.edu/cuyahogasp20

Darke                 go.osu.edu/darkesp20

Fairfield             go.osu.edu/fairfieldsp20

Fayette               go.osu.edu/fayettesp20

Franklin              go.osu.edu/franklinsp20

Fulton                 go.osu.edu/nwosp20

Hamilton            go.osu.edu/clerhamsp20

Hancock             go.osu.edu/aphsp20

Hardin                go.osu.edu/hardinsp20

Hocking             go.osu.edu/hockingsp20

Holmes               go.osu.edu/holmessp20

Licking               go.osu.edu/lickingsp20

Lucas                  go.osu.edu/lucassp20

Mahoning           go.osu.edu/mahoningsp20

Miami                 go.osu.edu/miamisp20

Montgomery      go.osu.edu/montgomerysp20

Morrow              go.osu.edu/morrowsp20

Ottawa               go.osu.edu/ottsandsp20

Perry                   go.osu.edu/perrysp20

Pickaway            go.osu.edu/pickawaysp20

Pike                    go.osu.edu/pikesp20

Putnam               go.osu.edu/aphsp20

Ross                   go.osu.edu/rossspring2020

Sandusky           go.osu.edu/ottsandsp20

Trumbull             go.osu.edu/trumbullsp20

Tuscarawas         go.osu.edu/tuscsp20

Vinton                go.osu.edu/vintonsp20

Warren               go.osu.edu/warrensp20

Washington        go.osu.edu/washingtonsp20

Wayne                go.osu.edu/waynesp20

Wood                 go.osu.edu/woodsp20

If your county isn’t listed, you may register with this link: go.osu.edu/yp4hspring20

Sourced from: Family and Consumer Sciences OSU Extension Pickaway County Ohio State University Extension

High Tunnels New for Cincinnati Area

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will offer a new opportunity to those interested in growing urban and rural produce in the Greater Cincinnati area to apply for financial and technical assistance for high tunnel systems, commonly referred to as hoop houses. Imagine the delicious taste of baby spinach freshly harvested from your own garden, in Cincinnati, all winter long. Impossible, right? Not anymore. High tunnels make growing vegetables possible long after the first frost. A high tunnel sits over top of the garden. Arch shaped aluminum poles support removable heavy plastic sheets that trap heat from the sun, warming the air. Most have a peak height that allows an adult to stand easily with room to spare. They look similar to greenhouses except plants grow in the ground instead of in pots. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Morning Ag Clips

OSU Extension Internship Program

OSU Extension is offering a paid internship this summer in some of our urban counties. Through this internship, interns work closely with local OSU Extension educators as they teach classes, work with volunteers and make a difference in the community. Interns will learn how to use their education to make a difference in people’s lives and realize what they are learning in college can have an impact on some of the most pressing issues facing Ohioans.

This year the internship is being offered in the following counties: Cuyahoga, Lucas, Mahoning, Stark, Putnam, Wayne, Columbiana, Portage, Greene, Ross, Fairfield, Washington, and Pike.

If you know of an interested student, please encourage them to complete an application.

Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Learning and Organizational Development

Federal FY21 Urban Agriculture Funding Request

The Subcommittee on Agriculture – Committee on Appropriations is circulating a letter to food and agriculture organizations to thank them for their work to support a vibrant and sustainable food and farm system and to request sign-on signatures. The Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018 authorized the creation of an Office of Urban Agriculture and Innovative Production (Sec. 12302) and an urban agriculture data collection initiative (Sec. 7212(b)); a critical first step in serving this growing sector of the U.S. agricultural economy. For Fiscal Year 2020 the Office was funded at $5 million. For the Fiscal Year 2021 agriculture appropriations bill, it is recommended to include $25 million to continue the work of the Office of Urban Agriculture and Innovative Production and related activities and $10 million for the urban agriculture data collection initiative. Follow this link for more information on the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018.

Sourced from: USDA

Ohio Celebrates the Agriculture Industry

Monday morning, assistant director Derickson kicked off Ohio Agriculture Week during a visit to 80 Acres Farms, a state-of-the-art, tech-centric indoor farm that’s housed entirely inside a Cincinnati-area warehouse. 80 Acres Farms is a 100 percent pesticide free, eco-friendly farm that delivers fresh produce to grocery stores across Ohio. “As a dairy farmer in Butler County for many years, I have a sincere appreciation for Ohio agriculture,” said Derickson. “This week recognizes and celebrate the many contributions that Ohio’s agriculture communities make to enhance the quality of life not only in our state, but throughout the country.”

Assistant Director Derickson will continue to celebrate Ohio Agriculture Week with more than a dozen events across Ohio in the coming days, including a stop at Jones Fish Hatchery, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Jones Fish is a family owned, industry leader in aquatic resource management, pond aeration, and Midwestern gamefish stocking. Jones has six locations across Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and northern Tennessee.

Follow this link to learn more.
Sourced from: Morning Ag Clips.

Prosperity is Increasing in America’s Largest Metro Areas, but Not for Everyone

Even amid a coronavirus outbreak that is prompting fear of a worldwide economic downturn, it’s worth reflecting that the United States has achieved a record-long economic expansion over the past decade-plus. The nation’s GDP has grown in every quarter since the middle of 2009, and the labor market has added jobs in every month since September 2010. However, GDP and job growth on their own are not sufficient markers of economic health. As the annual Metro Monitor illustrates, economic success involves a combination of growth, prosperity (increasing average value of an economy), and inclusion (improved well-being for everyone)—trends that differ dramatically in their trajectory and magnitude across the nation’s major metropolitan areas. This year’s Monitor tracks the performance of America’s metro area economies in these three respects, from the dawn of the Great Recession in 2008 through 2018 (the latest year of available data). Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: Brookings

University of Dayton Engineering Students Help Mission of Mary Cooperative

University of Dayton engineering students have helped Mission of Mary Cooperative, a Dayton-based urban farming operation, become the city’s first net-zero energy organization through the New Buildings Institute, a third-party non-profit organization pushing for better energy performance in buildings. The Cooperative produced 52,000 pounds of food last year on its 2-acre campus in the Twin Towers neighborhood, all while operating on 100 percent renewable energy. “By becoming the first net-zero organization in Dayton, Mission of Mary Cooperative hopes to inspire other organizations and residents all while continuing to be a catalyst and partner for urban sustainable development,” says Michael Schulz, executive director of Mission of Mary Cooperative and one of its lay Marianist founders.
Follow this link to read more.

Sourced from: University of Dayton

Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s Sustainable Urban Landscapes Symposium

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is hosting its 9th Sustainable Urban Landscapes Symposium as part of its Excellence in Horticulture Series of Symposiums. Speakers will tackle various talks under the loose headline of “Success Stories in Sustainable Horticulture.” The lineup this year includes: Peter MacDonagh, an internationally renowned expert in green infrastructure; Dr. Jamie Strange, Entomologist at Ohio State University and an expert on bumblebees; Joe Boggs, Hamilton County OSU Extension; and from the CZBG, Mark Fisher, Steve Foltz, and Scott Beuerlein. The event will be held on Thursday, March 12, 2020 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. Registration closes March 6, 2020. 

Follow this link to learn more.
Follow this link to learn more about the presenters.
Follow this link to join the Facebook event.

Sourced from: The Cincinnati Zoo