National Urban Extension Conference Postponed

After discussion and thoughtful consideration, the National Urban Extension Leaders (NUEL) has decided to postpone the May 2021 National Urban Extension Conference (NUEC), until May 2022. Details on the 2022 NUEC conference will be forthcoming in a few months. In lieu of holding the NUEC in May 2021, NUEL will be hosting a National Urban Extension Virtual Summit on May 18-20, 2021.

Please hold these dates on your calendar. A more detailed agenda and registration information will be released in early 2021.

Sourced from: NUEL

Land-Grant Cornerstone Conversation

Join the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) for the 2020 Land-Grant Cornerstone Conversation being held virtually during the 58th annual Farm Science Review on Tuesday, September 22. Dr. Cathann A. Kress, vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the CFAES and special guests, including Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, will discuss the future of agriculture research technology and prominent ways to ensure the food supply chain in Ohio and beyond. Follow this link to register. 

Sourced from: CFAES

A Beginner’s Guide to Intersectionality

Across outcomes in education, health, housing and nearly every other aspect of daily life in the United States, race is the single-most predictive indicator of one’s success. Racism is pervasive in government, non-profit and private systems and the policies, practices and procedures that create and uphold those systems and institutions. Dr. Camara Phyllis Jones defines racism as “a system of structuring opportunity and assigning value based on the social interpretation of how one looks (which is what we call “race”), that unfairly disadvantages some individuals and communities, unfairly advantages other individuals and communities, and saps the strength of the whole society through the waste of human resources.” Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: CitiesSpeak

Tony Talks to Teachers: Environmental Justice

Join Extension Educator, Tony Staubach, as he discusses environmental justice with colleague and friend Mary Dudley. Mary Dudley is the agriculture education instructor at James N. Gamble Montessori High School. She holds two master’s degrees, one in botany and one in education. Mary is eager to engage in the vital work of social justice as it relates to open access for healthy food options and safe outdoor spaces. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: Hamilton County Extension

Using ArcGIS StoryMaps in Your Research and Teaching

Want to make a map that will help you share the stories being uncovered through your research and make them accessible to a broader audience? Want to give your students an opportunity to engage with spatial thinking and work on an exciting digital project? ArcGIS StoryMaps allow you to weave an inspiring and interactive narrative by combining text, maps, and multimedia content – images, videos, and embeds – to communicate information through engaging and user-friendly web mapping applications. This self-paced, 100% online workshop should take approximately 90 minutes to complete beginning on September 14, 2020. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: CURA

130th Anniversary Celebration for 1890s Universities

Join higher education and civic leaders on Monday, August 31 at 1 p.m. for a webinar celebrating the 130th Anniversary of the Morrill Act of 1890, which designated 19 Historically Black Colleges and Universities with land-grant status. This legislation gave states funds to establish state universities for persons of color if higher education wasn’t already open to all in the state. The celebration will kick off the week of August 24 and conclude with this celebratory webinar. The webinar will be a chance to participate in a discussion of the legacy and future importance of the 1890s, led by 1890s leaders, policymakers, and others. Follow this link to learn more.

Sourced from: ECOP

Two Minutes with Tony: A Peaceful Fire

“As a child I participated in a theatrical production about fire. The production has three movements. At one point we danced around a pile of TVs on stage to represent a large bonfire. Later we were asked to escape a burning building. When asked what I would take from my home in a fire I quickly answered car keys. Apparently at 8-years-old I was going to drive away from that burning mess.” – Tony Staubach, Extension Educator, Hamilton County

Follow this link to read more.

Project for Public Spaces Recordings

If you missed any of the Project for Public Space webinars, they are now available to watch on their website. Project for Public Spaces provides opportunities to learn from other placemakers, and can help can take your observation, community engagement, and implementation skills to the next level. PPS provides regular in-house trainings, conferences, and speaking engagements, as well as customized events, tailored to your community. Follow this link to watch the recordings.

Sourced from: Project for Public Spaces