Medication Management Program

I remember when I first started pharmacy school and quickly realized that unlike some of my classmates, I knew very little about many of the common drugs used in community pharmacy. I wanted to get a job in pharmacy because I knew this would go a long way in helping me be a successful pharmacy student. Although getting a job in the first year of pharmacy isn’t the right move for everyone, it greatly helped me to put into practice the material I learned in the classroom.

My first Job in pharmacy was at the Medication Management Program  (MMP) here at The Ohio State University. I worked as a pharmacy intern. The Medication Management Program is a very unique first exposure to pharmacy. At this site, I was granted the opportunity to telephonically provide medication reconciliation services for patients.  As a first year student, it gave me a chance to better familiarize myself with commonly prescribed medications used in the geriatric population.

A typical work shift at MMP consisted of calling the patient, reviewing their medication list and updating the medication list with any changes either to the medications or to background information such as identifiers or the patient’s allergy profile.  After this medication reconciliation process, I was able to draft a letter with important pointers or reminders for the patient I spoke to. A pharmacist would then review my notes and approve a copy of the letter to be sent to the patient in addition to the electronic record kept on the patient’s profile.

I am so grateful that my first job was through the MMP as it gave me a great and flexibly paced way to learn the medications and their most common uses. Although I have now moved on to other opportunities, I will continue to sing the praises of the Medication Management Program at the Ohio State University. I am proud of the work the entire pharmacy team include the Technicians, Interns and Pharmacists do for our patient population.

As the field of pharmacy expands, I am certain in my evaluation that the MMP will also continue to grow and provide more opportunities for students.

One for All and All for One: A Spotlight on Kappa Psi

Hello everyone!

It’s hard to believe that this year is winding down and my time as a P3 is coming to a close. In a few short weeks I will have finished my finals and will be moving on to Capstone. June seems so far away right now but before I know it will be day one of my first rotation at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. But, before I get caught up in the nervous excitement of becoming a P4 I wanted to take a few moments to tell you about one of my favorite student organizations, Kappa Psi.

It is no secret that our college has a plethora of student organizations and each one offers something unique and valuable to its members. I myself have been a member of all 3 of our large organizations, APhA, SSHP, and SNPhA. But, my favorite organization here at Ohio State is by far Kappa Psi. The large organizations are fabulous for hearing about different opportunities and careers within the profession and ways that you can make an impact, but I have truly found a home within Kappa Psi.

Now, I know what you’re thinking, what makes Kappa Psi so special?  I won’t lie to you, it’s hard to put into words why Kappa Psi means so much to me, but I am going to do my best. One of my favorite things is that our chapter is extremely active in both our community and at school. This year we organized fundraisers for assisting the victims of Hurricane Harvey and raised funds for a virtual book drive for Reach out and Read. Here within Central Ohio we constantly volunteer for the free clinic Helping Hands and we made Valentines for the kids at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. But in order for us to be successful in our projects and initiatives we have to strong as a group. My brothers are some of my best friends and are always there for me when I need help with my classwork or time away from pharmacy school. Perhaps the best thing about Kappa Psi is that I feel connected to each class within the college and even with recent graduates. I have brothers in each class and Columbus has a graduate chapter and together we all support each other through the triumphs and challenges that arise in school. I honestly don’t think I would be the intern or student that I am today without my brothers. But, Kappa Psi is more than our chapter, Kappa Psi is the world’s largest pharmaceutical fraternity and our brotherhood goes beyond the city limits of Columbus.

This past weekend our Xi chapter journeyed down to Louisville, KY for our Spring Province meeting with the rest of our brothers from the Great Lakes Province. Our province includes chapters from local graduate chapters and schools including University of Cincinnati, University of Kentucky, Sullivan University, Ohio Northern University, Northeast Ohio Medical University, University of Toledo, Wayne State University, and Ferris State University. Going to Province is such an enjoyable experience for me because I love having the opportunity to network with fellow brothers from local schools (and sometimes brothers across the country!) and work on building strong relationships with them. While we may not see each other more than a few times a year, each time I meet up with a fellow brother we instantly pick up where we left off the last time and have a great time. I know that no matter what, I can always reach out to my fellow brothers to assist me in any way that I need.

ΚΨ Class of 2019 Brothers in Louisville, KY

Province offers many things to those who attend including continuing education credits, leadership discussions, financial planning sessions, and many more. But, one of my favorite parts of Province is the award ceremony where we honor the hardwork and triumphs of our local chapters for the year. I am happy to announce that the Great Lakes Province has been the most philanthropic province within Kappa Psi this year donating $4, 510 to our national charity Reach Out and Read! As an entire province we raised over $14,000 for various charities across the country to give back to our communities. Even more exciting news is that myself and the other brothers of Xi were the most charitable chapter within our province this year with our campaigns for Hurricane Harvey and Reach Out and Read! All in all, it was a great a weekend with my brothers and I left feeling inspired by the profession and my colleagues knowing that we truly do make a difference in people’s lives.

Xi Chapter posing with our Philanthropy Challenge Trophy

As my time within Parks Hall comes to an end, I have a sea full of memories about my time in the didactic portion of my PharmD, but almost all of them were made with my brothers of Kappa Psi. If there is any advice I could give to you as someone who is about to start their journey as a PharmD student, it would be to get involved and get involved early. Find your home within one of our many organizations and give it your all. Every employer or residency program is looking for leadership skills and those are things that can’t be entirely taught in the classroom. Also, take the time to go to the regional or national meetings because the networking opportunities associated with them are priceless. If you have any questions about our organizations or if you want more information about my experiences with Kappa Psi or other student organizations, feel free to reach out and email me.

It has been an absolute pleasure to share my thoughts and experiences as a student here at The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy. I wish you the best of luck with the rest of your journey to becoming a PharmD!

Sincerely,

Chelsea

ΚΨ Family: L-R my twin’s little, one of my littles, my big, me, and my twin

Hospital Inpatient Internship

I would like to share a little about my hospital inpatient internship.

I began my internship with Riverside Methodist Hospital inpatient pharmacy the summer before starting pharmacy school.  I had previous work experience in a community pharmacy but thought hospital would be a better fit and wanted to gain more insight.  I spent the summer training in various positions such as unit dose dispensing, IV preparations, and medication reconciliation.  When autumn semester began, I started a regular schedule working 8 hour shifts on Saturday/Sunday every other weekend and one 4 hour shift on a weekday evening, which averages 8-12 hours per week. I gained experience working both first (6:30am-3:00pm) and second (2:30pm-11:00pm) shifts.  While this schedule continued throughout the year, I had more time in the summer to pick up extra work shifts, get trained in new positions and shadow pharmacists in different specialties.  Through this internship I have been able to learn the differences between community and inpatient hospital pharmacy workflow.  I have also explored pharmacists’ roles in formulary management, administration, responding to codes, clinical research, and multi-disciplinary teams.  This past summer I was involved in more clinical tasks such as evaluating patient cases and dosing medications like vancomycin and warfarin.  These clinical experiences complement my learning in the classroom as I have been able to directly apply skills to real patient cases.  My internship has also encouraged me to get involved with protocol development and clinical research.  I am currently collecting data for a project focused on anticoagulant reversal agents.  Over the past three years, I have learned a lot about pharmacy and myself, including the career I wish to pursue.  So my recommendations are to explore and keep an open mind about your career. 

 -TaLeitha

ASHP Mid-Year

Hi all!

This week I would like to talk with you about national conferences! As Victoria stated last week, pharmacy organizations such as OPA, APhA, ASHP and NCPA hold national conferences every year to showcase developments, new literature and to recognize outstanding technicians and pharmacists in their specialized fields! These conferences last several days and incorporate and attract hundreds if not thousands of attendees! It is a great way to branch out, meet new people and network with wonderful people in our profession!

In December, I was fortunate enough to attend Mid-Year, ASHP’s national conference in Orlando, FL! It was an amazing time traveling with my classmates to attend a conference focused on hospital pharmacy, which is where our passions are! (Getting out of Ohio’s cold weather was obviously a plus, too!)

National conferences host an array of activities that participants can attend such as workshops, lectures from distinguished speakers, poster presentations from pharmacy interns and pharmacy residents, as well as a Residency Showcase, which is the focus for a lot of P3 and P4 students. The Showcase shines light on many of the country’s terrific residency programs, and students have the opportunity to speak with program directors to find out more about those respective programs. As a current P2, it was neat to walk through the Showcase and learn more about the soecifics of these residency programs. I’m still undecided on what part of hospital pharmacy I would like to specialize in, so I really appreciated being able to see various programs and what they have to offer!

While we were in Orlando, we sat in on various lectures, including one about applying for residencies and the matching process, a focused lecture on a pharmacist’s soon to be role in medical marijuana, antibiotic resistance and how to combat this issue in hospitals with a push for more culture and sensitivity tests. It was refreshing to see different facets of pharmacy being addressed! It was a wonderful opportunity to attend a national conference!

As always, if you have any questions, feel free to contact me at Erdmann.13@osu.edu.

All the best,

Ashley

Professional Conference Attendance – APhA Annual Meeting

Hi Everyone!

I’m writing to you as I travel back from Nashville, TN! This past weekend, myself and around twenty other Ohio State students attended the American Pharmacists Association (APhA)’s Annual Meeting. We had so much fun! The weekend was a perfect blend of networking, professional development, and fun. It was my first time visiting Nashville and I loved it.

For context, APhA is a national organization dedicated to supporting the profession of pharmacy. We have a student chapter of this organization here at OSU’s College of Pharmacy. Under national leadership, our student chapter focuses on advocating for the profession of pharmacy in our home state of Ohio and on providing pharmacy care services to our community. An example of our advocacy work would be the letter writing campaigns that we host as a way to connect with our state legislative representatives on issues like provider status for pharmacists. An example of a patient care project would be our project “OTC Medication Safety.” For this, we’ll host kids from local schools and do activities with them that cover topics like how to safely take medication with the help of a trusted adult.

Every year, APhA hosts a national conference for pharmacists and pharmacy students. Here’s a link to their website if you’d like to take a look at the schedule and read more about the sessions we attended! I really enjoyed getting to meet other student pharmacists from schools across the nation at these sessions. http://aphameeting.pharmacist.com

Here’s a picture of our chapter President accepting an award we won! Go Bucks!

Outside of the conference itself, we had the opportunity to explore the city. One restaurant of note was this place called “The Pharmacy” – how fitting! This “burger parlor and beer garden” served up some delicious German-inspired burgers and milkshakes in a fun twist on the classic, old-timey soda fountain pharmacies. If you’re ever in East Nashville, I highly recommend stopping by!

If you have questions about the conference or if you want to hear more about the awesome places we visited in Nashville, feel free to send me an email at Williams.4020@osu.edu! Now it’s time to unpack and get ready for the rest of the semester!

-Victoria

A Week in the Life

Hi all!

For this post, I thought it would be fun to give you an inside look into what life as a pharmacy student is like. Obviously, it varies for everyone, and it even varies weekly for me, but I wanted to give you at least some insight! Since next week is Spring Break for us, this is actually what my week looked like 2 weeks ago!

Some things to know: I work every other weekend at Nationwide Children’s Hospital (so one of the major differences for my classmates is that some work during the week and hardly at all on weekends), and I am a P2 (different years will have varying class schedules).

The biggest thing I hope you take away—work-life balance is not only attainable but is very important!

Sunday: I had a fairly lazy morning consisting of a short run, long breakfast, light studying and church until I went to work from 2-10:30 pm at Children’s!

Monday:

Workout 7-7:40

Class: The focus this module is on infectious diseases!

8:30-9:30: we had a lecture on Community Acquired Pneumonia from a specialist at the Wexner Medical Center

10-11:20: We had a lecture on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics

11:30-12:30: This is our professional hour! You can get lunch or engage in a student organization meeting—for me, I had a meeting.

12:30-1:30: Small Group Session where we applied what we had learned in our PK and PD sessions

1:30-2:30: We had a free hour to study/grab a snack/etc while the rest of our class did their own small group session

2:30-3:30: We had a lecture on Urinary Tract Infections

Home: My family got a new puppy on Sunday so I got to head home to Westerville to meet her and have dinner with my family! After, I went back to my Grandview apartment to do a little studying and watch the Bachelor with my roommates!

Tuesday: I have lab on Tuesdays, which means half a day of class!

Lab: 8:30-10:45 (usually it goes until 11:20 but I got out early)! We worked on a patient disease management encounter and SOAP note (Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan–it’s progress note detailing a patient encounter) for it as well as a review activity from one of our previous lab courses.

Home: I got home and went for a run outside (yay for sunshine and warm weather!) ate lunch and relaxed for a bit.

1-5:30pm: I worked updating my notes and started to study for our upcoming exam and workshops!

After studying I watched Netflix, ate dinner and then went to bible study to end the night!

Wednesday: This was definitely one of my busiest days! We have class and I take an elective!

5:40-6:40 am: Workout! A good workout is one of the best ways to start a long day!

6:45-8am: I got ready for class, ate breakfast and relaxed before heading to class!

Class:

8:30-10am: Our instructor had prepared a lecture to watch ahead of time so class was spent reviewing the high points and doing several patient cases on community acquire pneumonia and hospital acquired pneumonia.

10-11:20am: We had a small group session on Acute Otitis Media (ear infections) and Urinary Tract Infections where we went over patient cases and specific questions we may encounter both in practice and in the exam.

11:30-12:30pm: Professional hour again! I had an e-board meeting for Pharmacy Council today during this time.

12:30-3:45pm: We had the afternoon off due to small group sessions so I met up with a few of my good friends from class, chatted and did a little studying.

3:45pm-5pm: This is the timeslot for my leadership elective (it’s wonderful and I would highly recommend it to anyone interested).

6-7:45pm: I normally would have headed home but one of the organizations I am a part of, Student Society of Health Systems Pharmacists, had an event with dinner and networking with residents and pharmacists to gain insights into credentialing and privileging as well as the residency process.

Home: I finally headed home for the night where I polished off a pint of ice cream, did a little studying and watched a TV show with my roommates before heading to bed!

Thursday:

7-8am: I got up and got ready for class, had breakfast and did a little last-minute studying before my quiz in workshop.

Class: Today is my workshop today—this is essentially small group session for 3 hours in the morning for me!

8:30-9: This part of workshop is dedicated to iRAT/tRAT (individual and team quizzes) over content covered in class.

9-11:20: We worked on patient cases in our assigned teams and went through the answers we chose as a class—this was over the same material our iRAT/tRAT was on (Pneumonia—community, hospital and ventilator acquired).

11:30-12:30: Professional hour again! I had a student organization meeting today where we got lunch and had a panel of pharmacy technicians come in and talk about what makes a good pharmacist from their point of view, as well as the new technician licensure laws.

Home:

1-2pm: I got in my daily workout!

2-7:30pm: I did some studying—primarily organizing my notes for our upcoming exam on Monday, made a Target run and had dinner.

7:30-10pm: Time to relax! I watched TV and had a glass of wine with my roommate before calling it a night.

Friday:

Class:

8:30-10: We had a review session for our exam on Monday with several of our professors and practice questions

10-11:30: I went to the RPAC (one of OSU’s fantastic fitness facilities) for a long and relaxing workout

11:30-12:30: Professional Hour! But I don’t actually have a meeting today, so I got to get lunch with friends!

12:30-2:30: This is our lab lecture timeslot. This week we had a quiz and did an activity to prepare for our lab practical next week.

Home:

3-5:15: I baked banana bread, and got ready to go out with friends for the night

5:30-to the end of the night: One of my student organizations, SSHP, had an inter-professional social at Pint House with free appetizers, and after we headed to the IPC social itself (IPC hosts social events throughout the year for all the inter-professional schools)!

Saturday: Today was a pretty relaxed day. I woke up later, worked out, had a big breakfast and watched Netflix most of the morning and early afternoon. Later in the afternoon I started to study for our exam on Monday with my roommates, and a couple of classmates came over to join us! Overall it was a productive but relaxing day.

I hope this gives you a better look into what life is like as a P2! If you have any questions feel free to reach out!

Cassie

STAYING PHYSICALLY ACTIVE

Overall health and wellness is of great importance especially in the life of a professional student. As Pharmacy students, we are faced with the day to day stressors and difficulties that come with pursuing a career as a health professional. In addition to daily class attendance and participation, we have many outside of class assignment, rotations, internships. OH MY! It can get overwhelming quickly and you have to make sure to find healthy and safe outlets to relieve some of the stress. Otherwise, things could go downhill very quickly!

So what are some healthy and safe ways to relieve the stress? Why I’m so glad you asked! Well my new found favorite thing to do is going to the gym! I know I know, I’m late to the game but guys trust me going to the gym is AWESOME! The Ohio State University boasts of many amazing fitness centers. My favorite and perhaps the largest being the Recreation and physical activity center (RPAC). This gym is more than just a gym. It is a place of reflection; Where the stress and sorrows of pharmacology and therapeutics combined with Pharmaco-kinetics just fade away in a pile of sweat.

All jokes aside, living a non-sedentary life is very important. As students, most of our time is spent sitting down in lecture halls. The benefits of being physically active outweigh just the simple stress relief, it promotes strong cardiovascular health as well as overall well-being.

Granted everyday may not be a successful gym day, and on those days, I find other outlets to de-stress such as listening to some music or even catching up on some of my Netflix shows. No matter what kind of day it is, just take it in stride. One day at a time. Find what works for you and do your best and just watch the rest will take care of itself! Remember that you are a powerful and fierce being and you have to take great care of yourself before you can take care of anyone else.

The Midterm Struggle

Hello everyone!

 

It’s hard to believe that we’ve reached the end of February. It seems like last week the semester was just starting. But, with the end of February brings the beginning of March which means one thing—midterms.

 

Now I don’t know about you, but midterms are probably one of my least favorite times of the year. We’re stuck somewhere between winter and spring and the joy of Spring Break is looming around the corner. When you add in the stress of exams, project deadlines, and due dates to the weather it’s just an odd time of the year. But, fret not, we can and we will get through it! Here are a few of my tips for getting through midterms.

 

  1. Make a study plan
    • Your planner is your best friend. If you don’t have one, find one or utilize calendar apps. The most important thing you can do is to plan out a method of attack to help you tackle your to-do list. While the bulk of your plan may include study, project, or writing time don’t forget to give yourself some time off to recover. Which takes me to my second tip. . .

 

  1. Make time for yourself
    • After a long day of studying nothing feels better than finally being able to take a break. Go out to dinner with your friends, play trivia, catch a movie with your bestie, or play with a dog. Whatever lets you hit the reset button in your brain make time for it. While it may be a little rough getting through it, your mental health is more important than any due date.

 

  1. Hit the gym
    • Last week I went to one of my friend’s Circuit Cycle classes for the first time with a few of my friends. We spent a whole hour cross training spinning bikes and free weights and the only thing I could think about was what move I had to do next. I had absolutely no time to think about the things I had to complete on the weekend or the upcoming week and it was magical. I may not have been able to walk for the rest of the week but I felt so refreshed and powerful after. If the gym and group fitness isn’t your thing no problem. Take an hour to go outside for a run or stroll around your neighborhood. The main thing is that you’re taking time for yourself and moving.
      1. P.S. If you’re wondering who my instructor friend is it is no other than Victoria one of the other Ambassador Coordinators. Also, if you’re ever short on inspiration check out her fitness Instagram page @thefitpharmd

 

  1. Eat well
    • I’m not going to lie—I have a tendency to go straight to Chipotle or Chick-fil-a when I’m stressed. But, try and limit your comfort food as much as you can. One of my favorite healthy and quick meals is a salad. If you’re in a bind on what to make here’s my favorite Balsamic Strawberry Chicken Salad. Marinate your chicken breast in balsamic vinegar for a few hours in the refrigerator (tastes better if you let is marinate overnight but any time is better than no time) and then grill and cut in small pieces. Place chicken over a bed of spring mix, goat cheese, quartered strawberries, and poppy seed dressing. Not only is it delicious but it’s a nice peppy reminder that we’re almost to spring!

 

  1. Catch some zzzzzz
    • I can’t stress this one enough. Being able to sleep is imperative to being able to succeed. It’s actually been shown that those driving after not getting adequate sleep is equivalent to driving impaired. I don’t know about you but I wouldn’t want to go in to an exam when I’m not my best because I know that’s when I’m prone to making silly mistakes. It might be hard but try to bank at least 8 hours every night.

 

I hope my tips help get you to your final destination of Spring Break! I’m anxiously awaiting the end of all of my deadlines and exams so I can relax on my Bahamian cruise. You’ve got this and best of luck through midterms!!

 

Chelsea

 

IPPE/APPE

IPPE (Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience) and APPE (Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience) are a huge part of pharmacy school.  They provide real world opportunities to learn, grow, and complement the academic material we learn in the classroom.

IPPE includes all curriculum pharmacy experiences from the first to third year of pharmacy school. These experiences can vary between students based on site, preceptor, and activity but I will share a little about my experiences.  During my first year I completed 50 hours at Target community pharmacy (right before they became CVS pharmacy).  At the time, I interned at Kroger pharmacy, so this was a chance to learn about a different community site, system, and workflow. My preceptor reviewed and categorized the entire OTC section, which I really appreciated because a lot of questions from customers or patients are about OTC medications.  I also completed a geriatric IPPE rotation which was very unique and memorable.  For this experience, four of my classmates and I visited an independent senior living community once per week throughout a semester.  We played card games, attended facility sponsored events, and completed medication reviews. The goal of this rotation was to improve our skills and comfortability interacting with the geriatric population.  As a second-year pharmacy student, I completed 40 hours of hospital pharmacy experience at OSU Ross Heart Hospital.  Paired with another student, I participated in multidisciplinary rounds, drug information questions, and clinical trial data reviews.  By the end, I had a better understanding of hospital pharmacy and how to communicate within a healthcare team.  I also completed 20 hours of medication reconciliation at OSU Ross Heart Hospital during the summer. I learned the importance of interviewing patients, calling pharmacies to obtain an accurate list of medication, and being detailed.  This process can be challenging when the patient is unable to confirm their medications, they use multiple pharmacies to fill their prescriptions, or they have complicated medication regimens.  At the beginning of my third year, I completed 20 hours of ambulatory care experience at OSU Total Health and Wellness Clinic.  I spent time shadowing my preceptor during patient appointments as well as counseling patients on topics such as diabetes, hypertension, and tobacco cessation.  Later in the semester I completed 40 hours with pharmacists at Riverside Methodist Hospital in various areas: cardiology, emergency medicine, hospice, palliative care, intensive care, and neurological critical care.   Collectively, these experiences have given me an idea of what to expect for APPE.

APPE makes up the fourth year of pharmacy school with 9 monthly rotations.  Those 9 rotations include: 2 hospital, 2 community, 1 ambulatory care, 2 patient care, and 2 elective.  Faculty, preceptors, and previous students are available to help guide students through this process as it can be overwhelming given the many types of rotations available.  The scheduling of these monthly rotations is mostly done via a computer-generated match system based on individual student rank lists.  Rotations that do not use the match system require a separate application.  When ranking rotations, there are many things to consider such as: location, career goals, finances, etc.  I am currently anxiously awaiting my APPE schedule, however, based on the rotation sites that OSU has to offer, I know I will learn wherever I go. 

 – TaLeitha

Find Your Balance

Hey everyone!

This week, I would like to discuss school-life balance. It’s super important and crucial for success in pharmacy school!

Let me tell you all a bit about my experience with this:

I walked into Parks Hall on August 1, 2016, ready to tackle my first day of pharmacy school. I could not have been more excited to begin my pharmacy career as a Buckeye. The first two weeks of school kept me busy with our Transitions module where we completed an array of activities designed to help us begin our P1 year with a sturdy professional foundation. The semester then began to build upon itself, with the courses becoming progressively more integrative and challenging as the weeks went on.

When summer came, I remained pretty busy, working full time at Mount Carmel West Hospital as an inpatient intern, and traveling to Honduras on a medical brigade with PODEMOS. Even though I was busy, I was doing things that I truly enjoyed.

This year, we are learning about the pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, therapeutics and pathophysiology associated with different disease states and a pharmacist’s role in managing them. The material is manageable but challenging at times.

I am now in my fourth semester of pharmacy school, and there have been moments where I’ve felt I don’t have enough time in the day to accomplish all of the things I need to do. At times I have felt overwhelmed and frayed. I knew I needed to incorporate more balance into my daily/weekly schedule, to help keep me energized and centered. I like to play tennis, use the facilities at the RPAC and read. I really enjoy exploring and experiencing the many delicious restaurants and coffee shops that Columbus has to offer with my friends. I have noticed such a difference in my overall happiness since I started doing more things that I enjoy. It’s nice to have something fun to work towards and look forward to at the end of a busy week.

My advice to you, Buckeyes and future Buckeyes, is this:

Amidst the hustle and bustle of Parks Hall, find your balance. Find your passion and go explore it. I strongly believe it is important to create balance in your lives, which will provide you with a more well-rounded and enjoyable pharmacy experience. Go Bucks!

Best,

 

Ashley