Religion-Environment Photo Contest Winner: Cassidy Jenney

Photo courtesy of Cassidy Jenney.

Cassidy Jenney is an SENR Alumni and current staff member at The Ohio State University.

Her photo tied for third place in the 2019 photo contest. She says the following about her submission: “While traveling to one of the seven natural wonders of the world in Australia, she felt a spiritual connection when she saw the 12 Apostles. Her passion for earth and those who inhabit it is heightened every time she steps out of our built infrastructure and into a natural space. She felt this picture was able to convey emotions she feels while in nature for others who may not have the opportunity to visit this space. The light peeking out from behind the rocks corroded by waves shows the relationship nature can have with our internal senses and spirituality.”

Religion-Environment Photo Contest Winner: Kelsey Ryan-Simkins

Kelsey Ryan-Simkins is a PhD student in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at The Ohio State University and holds a master’s degree from the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. As an environmental sociologist, her research focuses on the social, cultural, and religious dimensions of the food justice movement and aims to contribute to the creation of environmentally sustainable and equitable food systems in the United States. Kelsey has been involved with several applied food system transformation projects that have explored the establishment of food hubs in marginalized neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. She serves on the board of directors of both Ohio Interfaith Power and Light and the International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture.

Kelsey’s photo tied for third place with the title, “Reciprocity.” She states the following about her submission:”I took this photo in 2016 when I was working at The GrowHaus, a nonprofit urban farm, marketplace, and education center in Denver’s Elyria-Swansea neighborhood. The people I worked with brought many different religious and spiritual backgrounds—Jewish, Buddhist, Latter-Day Saints, Quaker, humanist—into the values we shared around the importance of a just and sustainable food system. This work inspired my interest in how secular food spaces inspire deeply spiritual experiences of connection. I think this photo captures the essence of connection in a cross-species relationship.”

Religion-Environment Photo Contest Winner: Mikayla Benjamin

Picture courtesy of Mikayla Benjamin.

Mikayla Benjamin is Columbus born and raised, and she studies both environmental science and environmental policy at The Ohio State University.  Her many interests include traveling, hiking, working with the homeless under the citypak project, and photography.

Mikayla’s photo won second place, and she states the following about her submission: “This photo always served as a reminder that life always finds a way, and it reminded me that even when things weren’t always going my way, I would grow through it and find a way, just as nature found a way to grow plants in a discarded glass jar left in the middle of the forest.”

NRPE Archive: Model Environmental Justice Projects (1997)

In the late 1990s, the National Religious Partnership for the Environment was searching American faith communities to find best examples of environmental justice work. Following on a few previous compilations, this collection of 35 example stories of projects from across the country was published in 1997. In a parallel effort, the local community leaders of these projects wrote letters highlighting their work to share with the Clinton administration in Washington, DC. Those letters were received by Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt and Vice President Al Gore, who met with senior religious leaders in a series of meetings in DC to learn about the environmental justice work of faith communities.

NRPE_Model_EJ_Projects_1997

Blessed Are the Consumers

Image courtesy of Amazon.com

In this work, Sallie McFague unites her love of hagiography, the study of the saints, and the urgent need to address overconsumption in the economy and the environment. McFague suggests a close study of lives of the saints. Here specifically, she considers Simone Weil, John Woolman, and Dorothy Day, in the hope that contemporary believers may find a path from belief to faith-inspired action. A kenotic lifestyle, one of self-emptying, the author sees reflected in the lives of the saints considered here. She sees the unified path to kenosis inspired by the “wild space” of voluntary poverty, the awakening of the saint through this poverty to material needs of others, the increase in view of the self to include a universal self, and finally the connection of the kenotic lifestyle to the personal and public spheres of life.

Speaking specifically to middleclass readers, McFague condemns the complacent comfort in which we live that destroys God’s creation, human and nature alike. She calls for a radical understanding of the divine incarnation and expansion of the self to include the universal. An unsettling of traditional theology in favor of recognition that kenotic love is that which fuels the universe is the good news that can oppose the crisis in the economy and environment. McFague brilliantly weaves the example of the saints with our own call to action which must, like the saints discussed, be personal and public.

To learn more about Sallie McFague click here. This along with McFague’s other works can be found on Amazon or through your favorite independent bookstore.

Ecofaith on the Air

Podcasts are a wonderful resource to connect with experts and learn more about many topics. For faith leaders and laity alike “ecofaith on air” is a wonderful resource to learn more about perspectives in ecotheology. Started in April 2015, they have provided many conversations, panels, and interviews that can be accessed on podcast platforms. The podcast concluded in January 2019, but you can access old episodes that span such topics as World Environment Day and the Cosmic Christ. Episodes range in length from under ten minutes to about an hour.

 

To access the ecofaith on air backlog click here. The still active facebook group can be accessed here.

Deep Green Faith: Holy Forest Kinship

Image courtesy of http://beeckencenter.sewanee.edu

In September 2019, the Beecken Center and the Center for Religion and the Environment are offering a conference that approaches the connections of faith and ecology to trees and forests. Presenters include Matthew Sleeth, MD, Karen Kuers, PhD, Connie Keetle, and Robert Gottfried, PhD. This conference plans to investigate how trees natural interactions with the ecosystem around them and scripture’s engagement of trees may teach us how to live.

 

To learn more about the conference or to register, click here.

Profile: Mary Evelyn Tucker

Image courtesy of journeyoftheuniverse.org

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a scholar at Yale University where she serves in both the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Divinity School. She and her husband, John Grim started the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale.  Beyond this, her work has probed the intersection of religion and ecology.

 

For more information on Dr. Tucker, click here.

Journey of the Universe

Image courtesy of journeyoftheuniverse.org

Journey of the Universe is a multi-form approach that tells the story of the universe. It emphasizes the interconnected nature of the world, and it calls upon the human community to tend to the world on which we rely. An interdisciplinary approach that engages science, narrative, and humanist wisdom. The material is available in a book, documentary, and online course. Beyond these initial forms, the Journey of the Universe has expanded into a YouTube channel and podcast. The documentary is available on Amazon prime and the book is available on amazon or through your favorite independent bookshop. This set is a wonderful resource that may be used in many ways including in movie features or book groups.

To access the Journey of the Universe website click here.

 

The Green Seminary Initiative Partner Schools

For an individual interested in ecological justice and ministry, it may be important to attend a seminary or divinity school that is committed to care of creation. Partnering schools are listed below.

  • Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
  • Boston University School of Theology
  • Christian Theological Seminary
  • Claremont School of Theology
  • Columbia Theological Seminary
  • Drew Theological School
  • Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
  • Methodist Theological School in Ohio
  • Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary
  • The Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology
  • Trinity Lutheran Seminary
  • Universidad Biblica Latinamericana
  • Union Presbyterian Seminary, Charlotte.

Many other schools have filed reports with the Green Seminary Initiative. To access a list of those schools and to learn more about the partnering schools, click here.