Actions You Can Take: 4-H’ers in Times of National Crisis

All the recent events and how people have responded have me thinking about a lot of things. I wondered what 4-H’ers had done during other times of national crisis, and how what happened in the past might help us learn how young people can take control in our present time of pandemic. First let’s take a look at what 4-H’ers did during World War II.

A Look at the Past

The 4-H History Preservation webpage documents how 4-H’ers supported the war effort during World War II.

Girl with corn plant

4-H member with corn plant in her Victory Garden

They sold war bonds and grew victory gardens. To raise money to buy war equipment, planes, ships, and ambulances, they collected and sold scrap metal, rubber, and phonograph records. They even collected milkweed pods, collecting enough to stuff 1 million life jackets – no small effort!

There’s even a reference to efforts of Ohio 4-H members on the 4-H history page:

“Winding up 1943 outstanding war services, Ohio 4-H members and leaders purchased $510,041 in War Bonds for which a four-motored flying fortress heavy bomber aircraft was purchased and christened “Buckeye 4-H” at Lockbourne Air Base [now Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base near Columbus] in a special ceremony at which Ohio Director of Extension H. C. Ramsower presided. Junior Stuckey, Circleville, and Betty Brandt, Rushville, spoke for 4-H members. Lt. Dick Brandt, brother of Betty and a former 4-H’er, also participated. He was on furlough after having completed 50 bombing missions over Africa, Sicily, and the Continent.”

From these examples, we see that 4-H’ers were asked to do things, things that involved something outside themselves. They felt like they we doing their part to contribute to the war effort. They could see the tangible results of their efforts. These efforts could be measured – in pounds of scrap metal collected, number of planes sponsored, or amount of vegetables grown. I am sure that if asked, today’s 4-H’ers would do the same.

The Present Pandemic

Enter the coronavirus pandemic. What’s the difference compared with other times of national crisis? It seems like we’re being asked to stop doing things – stay home; no group activities like club meetings, graduations, or birthday parties; stop seeing friends. If we’re going to help, we think we should be doing something more active. We are being asked to do things, but they are more self-focused, at least on the surface. But if you look deeper, we’re being asked to do these things to protect not just ourselves, but to protect others. It’s harder to measure these things. But it’s part of our collective responsibility to our community, country, and world.

What can YOU do?

At times like this, it’s easy to feel out of control. But you have control over your behavior. Here are actions you can take:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds. (See Callia’s hand washing video here.)
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Cover sneezes and coughs.
  • Wear a mask or face covering over your nose, mouth, and chin when out in public. (Go to the Ohio Department of Health for a mask checklist.)
  • Keep a physical distance of 6 feet from others when out in public, even if you’re wearing a face covering.
  • Stay at home when you are sick.
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands or after touching surfaces.
  • Keep high-touch surfaces clean (e.g., doorknobs, light switches).
  • Stay connected to others virtually.
  • Spend time in outdoor recreation.
  • Keep a positive attitude and practice self-care (see our recent post on this topic).

There are other things 4-H’ers can do. In one of our previous posts, we featured 4-H’ers using their sewing skills to make masks to donate. Others are making signs or videos to thank essential workers in their community or writing cards to residents living in senior centers. Camp counselors are working on ways to do virtual camps this summer. These things are important too.

many children holding letters to spell thank you

4-H’er’s from Morgan County did a photo collage to thank essential workers

Handmade cards

Cards made by 4-H’ers from Columbiana County

4-H'ers with signs to thank essential workers

Brown County 4-H’ers displaying their signs thanking essential workers

3 4-H'ers with beef cattle and signs thanking essential workers

4-H’ers and friends from Wood County thank essential workers

Some day in the future the coronavirus pandemic will be behind us, part of history, a story to tell your grandchildren. As with other times of national crisis, what will be the story others will read about what 4-H’ers did during this time of pandemic? YOU can be part of writing that story. You can commit to using your head, heart, hands, and health to keep yourself and others safe.

Today’s 4-H Journal page helps you think about actions you are already doing and action you can take.

Yours in health,

Signature

 

Actions I Can Take Activity Page Social Media post

Daily Dose- Happy Mother’s Day

Picture of My Mom and I

My Mom and I

According to the History Channel, The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. We celebrate Mother’s Day on the second Sunday of May every year. The founder Anna created the holiday as a way for people to thank their own Mother and spend time with that special woman in their life. CNN’s article on Mother’s Day gives some of the specifics of the origin including the insight that Jarvis’ Mother was a community health advocate! Below is an excerpt.

“In 1908, Jarvis campaigned for a national observance of the holiday in honor of her mother, who was a community health advocate. Her mom had organized several Mother’s Day Work Clubs that addressed child rearing and public health issues, and Jarvis wanted to commemorate her and the work of all mothers.”

As we experience Mother’s Day this year it is important to look at the core of what Mother’s Day means and find ways to spend time with our Mother (even if that means digitally this year). Sometimes we take for granted the time we spend with family. Think about what it truly means to spend time with someone. What does it look like? How does it make you feel?

For me, spending time with my Mother is often creative. We work on calendars, journals, crafts, and some of my favorite early memories with my mother were doing crafts and activities at home. I have acquired her hobby of cutting out pictures in magazines, greeting cards, and reusing them in my calendar and journal entries.  It usually includes us sitting on the couch, talking over upcoming events, and relaxing. It helps me feel connected to her, more relaxed, and provides a wonderful creative outlet while completing what we are working on. Use today’s journal to spend some time with your Mom and learn more about her!

Today’s journal is a fun one to do with your Mom! Answer the questions about her and then see how well you do! It is harder than it may seem.

 

 

 

Daily Dose- What is Self-Care?

Have you felt yourself being more emotional lately? Maybe it is harder to decide what you want to do, or you are feeling “on edge?” According to The Cleveland Clinic these can be signs of stress. The feelings that we get when things in our life are uncertain can add to our stress. There are many ways you can help deal with these feelings, but one of my favorites is to take some time for self-care.

Self-care is making sure we pay attention to our own well-being (whether that be mental, emotional, or physical). It is taking some time to purposefully do things that make you feel good about yourself. Although this sounds simple, it is often something we overlook.

Self-care is not being selfish. If you have ever flown on a plane, you’ve heard the flight attendants tell you to put on your own oxygen mask before helping someone else. Self-care is your oxygen mask. And it is especially important in these times of uncertainty.

Here are some suggestions about how to practice self-care.

  1. Find ways to express how you feel, especially if you don’t know what it is you are feeling. Talk to a friend or trusted adult.
  2. Make time for low-stress activities to do by yourself. One such activity I like is coloring or doing craft projects.
  3. Listen to your favorite music.
  4. Get outside. Take a walk. Bring your pet along if you have one!
  5. Do a puzzle.
  6. Have a routine (brush your teeth, get dressed, eat breakfast).

The current challenging times mean that self-care is more important than ever. Practicing good self-care can help you tackle life’s challenges. But self-care isn’t only for times of stress. Regular self-care is good for you when times are good. It can help you be more resilient to face new challenges.

Today’s Journal allows you to write in some ideas you may have about self-care for yourself! Maybe it is something you do by yourself, or something that you decide to do with your family at home. Be creative when you can’t get together face-to-face – you can even do virtual self-care sessions with your friends and family.

Download Today’s Journal

In Great Love,

Teachers Touch the Future

It’s Teacher Appreciation Week! Being a teacher has taken on new meaning during the current coronavirus pandemic. Overnight, schools shut down and lessons moved online.

classroom picuture of teacher and students

My kindergarten class picture – I’m in the first row, far right

Although it was many, many years ago (long before the internet was a thing), I can still remember my kindergarten teacher. Her name was Mrs. Schiller. In the summer after school was out, my mother invited her to our house for cookies and tea. In my mind it was like having the Queen of England come to visit. And ever since I was a little girl, I wanted to be a teacher. I would play school, writing on the blackboard with chalk. When I was 10, I even taught my 3-year-old sister the state capitals, because that’s what I was learning in school. I would point to a state on the map on the wall and she dutifully replied with the capital city. I probably should have focused on teaching her something more age appropriate than 5th grade geography. Oh well, she survived, and went on to become a college professor. Now she is one of the many parents ensuring their children are learning at home. I did go one to study education, and my teaching degree led me to a career in Extension.

It’s also National Nurses Week. Nurses are among the essential workers in our world, even before the pandemic hit. Did you ever stop to think – who teaches the nurses to be nurses? Today I’d like to spotlight someone who does just that – my sister-in-law. She’s been a nurse for 37 years, in a variety of different positions – staff nurse in a large hospital, oncology nurse, head nurse, hospice nurse, home care nurse, and nurse educator in a hospital setting.

Group of women

Teacher and her nursing students

Now she has been teaching future nurses for about 20 years. She is an adjunct faculty member at a university, where her current job is being a clinical instructor. As a clinical instructor, she helps students take what they have learned in the classroom and put it into practice. She helps students learn how to provide care directly to patients. Clinical instruction blends the art and the science of nursing.

As you can imagine, this type of class depends on working directly with people. She said it was a “huge challenge” to all of a sudden have to teach this type of class remotely, but she and the students all worked together and learned a lot. Her students are now graduating and entering the field as nurses. They wanted to become nurses “to care for others,” “to make a difference” in other people’s lives, and “to be a sense of comfort and support in their times of need.”

There are many different types of nurses and teachers. A career as a teacher or nurse is very rewarding. Maybe one of these careers is for you!

Teacher Appreciation Week is reminder to take time out to thank the teachers in our lives. And thank your parents for being your teachers during the school shutdown. See our activity page to get your thoughts down on paper. Teachers often don’t know if they’ve made a difference – it will make a teacher’s day if you send a note to them.

Download today’s journal page to write a thank you letter to a teacher.

 

Yours in health,

Signature

 

 

Daily Dose- Tips for Taco Tuesday

plate with food

Tips for Taco Tuesday: My taco turned into taco salad, using ingredients I had at home

Tacos have their origin in Mexico. A tortilla is a type of flatbread, and a taco is simply a tortilla wrapped around a filling. Like a sandwich, the filling can be made with almost anything and prepared in many different ways. Here are some tips for Taco Tuesday!

Many restaurants feature specials for Taco Tuesday, but you can make tacos at home! The variations of tacos are endless! When you make your own tacos, you get to the control the ingredients.

 Be Mindful about MyPlate

To pack the most nutritional punch into your tacos, use MyPlate to design yours. Be mindful of the sodium and fat content of your food choices. Meats and cheeses will contribute to the fat content; they also contribute important vitamins and minerals. Cheese, canned beans, and prepared tortillas and chips will contribute to the sodium content. Read labels to select low-sodium varieties. You can include any ingredient, just consider the portion size. Fresh veggies add vitamins and minerals. They are naturally low in calories and sodium – they’re colorful too!

Make-Your-Own Taco Bar

If you set up a Make-Your-Own Taco Bar, you can satisfy everyone’s individual tastes.

Grain

  • Soft tortilla (flour or corn)
  • Taco shells
  • Tortilla chips
  • Cooked rice

 Vegetables

  • Pepper, chopped or in strips
  • Diced tomatoes
  • Shredded lettuce
  • Shredded spinach
  • Cauliflower (roasted or fresh)
  • Shredded carrots
  • Diced onions
  • Sliced avocado
  • Shredded red cabbage
  • Corn

Protein (see recipe for seasoning mix)

  • Ground turkey or beef
  • Shredded chicken or pork
  • Fish or other seafood
  • Beans – black, kidney, pinto, garbanzo, white, or combination

Dairy

  • Shredded cheese

Other Toppings & Seasonings

  • Chopped cilantro
  • Squirt of lime
  • Salsa or hot sauce
  • Chopped green onions
  • Red pepper flakes
  • Thinly sliced radishes
  • Sour cream
  • Black olives

Theresa’s Twist on Pandemic Taco Tuesday

I’m making limited trips to the grocery store these days. Since it’s been almost 2 weeks since I’ve been shopping, to make my taco I had to use the ingredients I had on hand.

Challenge accepted! I didn’t have tortillas, but I did have some tortilla chips, so my taco turned into taco salad. I still had some fresh vegetables and I had made my own chili over the weekend.

Tip: Layering the spinach between the tortilla chips and the chili kept the chips from getting soggy.

  • Tortilla chips
  • Shredded spinach
  • Three-Bean Chili
  • Shredded Colby-Jack cheese
  • Cilantro
  • Avocado slices
  • Orange pepper rings
  • Chopped red onion
  • Sliced radishes
  • Squirt of lime

Check out our Make-Your-Own Taco activity page here.

Make Your Own Tacos Bar 

 

Packaged seasoning mixes usually contain a lot of sodium. Here’s a recipe to make your own.

HOMEMADE SEASONING MIX

Prep: 5 minutes

Yield:  appx. 2 Tablespoons of seasoning, enough for 1 ½ to 2 pounds of meat or vegetables

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon ground pepper

Equipment Needed:

  • Measuring spoons
  • Small bowl

Directions:

  1. Measure all ingredients and combine.
  2. Add seasonings as you are cooking meat or vegetables.
  3. If making ahead, store in airtight container.

I hope you have enjoyed these Tips for Taco Tuesday!

Yours in health,

 

 

 

#TacoTuesday #MyPlate #VaryYourVeggies #CookAtHome

#4HInThisTogether #StayHomeOhio #ThankYouPublicHealth #leanonyourlandgrant #LandGrantFierce #OSUExtension #ohio4h #COVID19 #coronavirus #4thH #4Hhealthliving

Daily Dose- Pizza with Pizazz

Pizza and salad makes a meal

Let’s participate in Pizza Day! Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced Spirit Week, with Friday as Pizza Day. The governor has asked everybody who participates to tag their pictures with #SpiritWeekOhio #InThisTogetherOhio #StayHomeOhio. Your photo may be featured on state social media platforms!

Pizza has been called the world’s most popular food. Traditional pizza is cooked in a wood-fired oven. It originated in Italy and was brought to the U.S. by Italian immigrants, where it has taken on a life of its own. About 1 in 8 Americans eat pizza on any given day.

Composed of flatbread with toppings, pizza had humble beginnings. It started as peasant food, but it’s fit for a queen. A classic pizza is Pizza Margherita – a crust topped with soft, white mozzarella cheese; red tomatoes; and green basil. It is said to be named after Italy’s Queen Margherita. (The colors of this pizza are also the colors of the Italian flag.)

Pizza sometimes has a bad reputation as an unhealthy food, but it doesn’t have to be. Ingredients to be on the lookout for are sodium and fat. Sources of fat include meat and cheese, which, in addition to some crusts, also contribute to the sodium content. You can include any ingredient, just be mindful of amounts and portion sizes.

You can make pizza a home! Recipes abound on the internet, but you can get creative and make our own. You’ll need to look up recipes if you want to make your own crust. Here’s one to get you started. 

The variations of pizza are endless! When you make your own pizza, you get to the control the ingredients. Use your creativity to Design Your Own Pizza.

 

Be Mindful about MyPlate

To pack the most nutritional punch into your pizza, use MyPlate to design yours. Here are some suggestions:

 

Design Your Own Pizza

Be creative and use the ingredients you have on hand

Crust (Grain)

  • Naan bread
  • English muffin
  • Pita bread
  • Flour tortilla
  • Refrigerated biscuits or crescent rolls
  • Homemade pizza crust (with or without yeast)
  • Cauliflower crust (Vegetable Group)

Base

  • Tomato sauce
  • Pesto

Toppings (Vegetables) And the great debate – is pineapple on pizza acceptable?

  • Fresh vegetables (peppers, onions, zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, potatoes, spinach, asparagus, etc.)
  • Cooked vegetables (great way to use up leftovers)

Toppings (Protein)

  • Meats
  • Seafood

Toppings (Dairy)

  • Shredded cheese or fresh Mozzarella cheese

Seasonings

  • Fresh or dried herbs (such as basil, oregano, parsley, chives)
  • Chopped fresh garlic or garlic powder
  • Crushed red pepper
  • Green onions
close up of homemade pizza

Pizza with Pizazz – Here’s my Pizza Day creation with ingredients I had at home

Here’s the pizza I made with ingredients I had on hand: I didn’t use the oven to make my pizza. I used naan bread for the crust, which I heated in a frying pan, with a small amount of oil to prevent sticking. I topped the naan with a thin layer of tomato sauce. I sautéed an onion, chopped garlic, and peppers – green, orange, yellow, and red (about 1 cup). I topped the crust with the vegetable mixture and added shredded parmesan cheese and basil. Easy and tasty!

The “Let’s Start Cooking” 4-H project has a recipe for Veggie Pizza (page 29).

#SpiritWeekOhio #InThisTogetherOhio #StayHomeOhio #pizza

#4HInThisTogether #StayHomeOhio #ThankYouPublicHealth #leanonyourlandgrant #LandGrantFierce #OSUExtension #ohio4h #COVID19 #coronavirus #4thH #4Hhealthliving

 

Yours in Health,

 

 

 

Daily Dose- Superheroes – Ordinary and Extraordinary

teenagers in a line wearing capes

Camp counselors wearing capes at a superhero-themed camp

Although they have their beginnings in mythology, many trace the rise of superheroes in the U.S. to the late 1930s. This was a time when the U.S. was suffering from the fall-out of the Great Depression and before entering World War II.

What makes a superhero? Superheroes have some kind of extraordinary power. They fight crime or use their talents to do some good. They try to make the world a better place. They are clever in how they use tools and technology (think Superman’s cape, Spiderman’s webs, and the Batmobile). Another part of the appeal of superheroes is that they give us someone to look up to. And they wear costumes! Now every year at Halloween there are bound to be children (and adults) dressed up as the classic Superman and Batman, as well as the popular superhero of the day.

In the book titled Superhero Ethics: 10 Comic Book Heroes, 10 Ways to Save the World, Which One Do We Need Most Now?, author Travis Smith floats the idea that it is not their superpowers that make them so super. Instead, it is their character and qualities, which guide what they do with their power. He said that superheroes represent “the qualities that human beings must cultivate in order to confront the quandaries of ordinary life.” In other words, they point out the qualities that will help us to be better people.

As super as they are, superheroes aren’t perfect. After all, Superman has his kryptonite. Through these characters we can learn to turn our weaknesses into advantages. In that way, they are a symbol of hope, that you can overcome challenges and make yourself into a better person.

3 girls wearing Superman costumes

Camp counselors are superheroes!

Who are our modern-day superheroes? Perhaps today we have a new idea of superhero, a time when ordinary people are doing extraordinary things. They don’t wear capes – they wear scrubs and lab coats and the uniforms of police and firefighters. They work in schools and hospitals and homes. They are “disguised” as the ordinary people who drive trucks with needed supplies, stock shelves in our grocery stores, and drive public transportation. They work long hours to fight an invisible enemy. They are the essential workers of the coronavirus pandemic.

In Spider-Man 2, Aunt May reminds Peter Parker that “there’s a hero in all of us.” Today, my heroes are 4-H teen leaders sewing masks and matching 4-H members as pen pals. It’s families using 3D printers to make personal protective equipment for medical staff. You are a superhero when you stay home, even when it’s hard, and when you wear a mask to keep others safe.

Download Today’s 4-H Journal Here!

Yours in Health,

 

 

 

Daily Dose- 4-H Meeting Mad Lib!

Today is National Tell a Story day! Stories come from all places including friends, families, experiences, or even from our imagination. A story can be a way to share history with others, connect to family members, or even entertain us.

For National Tell a Story day I decided to celebrate with a story where you get to decide some of the fun details of our story. Today’s story is about our first meeting back face-to-face! I am using a style called mad lib which gives a template for another person to fill in the blanks. The trick is, you fill in the blanks before you see the story!

I had a blast developing this template and testing it on my family. I hope you will enjoy (and share yours) as well!

Mad Libs originated in 1953. You can read the full history of them here!

Today’s Journal – Tell a Story

 

 

 

Daily Dose- Let’s Get Moving! Be Fit at Home

3 girls on yoga mats moving their arms

Yoga at the State Fair

Physical activity is one part of being fit and healthy. According to the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, children and adolescents should do 60 minutes or more of physical activity every day. You don’t even have to do 60 minutes all at once. The first key guidelines is move more and sit less!

There are many activities you can do to be fit at home. Let’s break it down into the different types of activities you can do.

Recipe for Physical Fitness

  1. Flexibility activities
  2. Aerobic activities
  3. Muscle-building activities
  4. Bone-strengthening activities

 

  1. Flexibility:
    • What are they: These activities help your joints and muscles move easily.
      • Examples: forward bends, toe touches, shoulder rolls, knees to chest, yoga poses. Stretch slowly and smoothly; don’t bounce.
    • How often: Stretch to take a break from sitting. If warming up, spend 2-3 minutes doing flexibility exercises. Hold each stretch for at least 10 seconds and increase as time goes on.
    • How they help: Stretching keeps your muscles loose and relaxed. Being flexible decreases your chance of getting hurt and prevents you from getting sore. Flexibility exercises can help you warm up before more vigorous activities.
  2. Aerobic activities: Most of the 60 or more minutes a day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity.
    • What are they: These activities get your heart beating faster!
      • Moderate-intensity aerobic: active recreation such as hiking, skateboarding, rollerblading, cross-country skiing, and bike riding; walking; games that require catching and throwing; and house and yard work such as sweeping or pushing a lawn mower
      • Vigorous-intensity aerobic: running, active sports, vigorous dancing, aerobics, active games that involve running and chasing, and jumping rope.
    • How often: at least 3 days a week
    • How they help: Aerobic activities helps your body use oxygen and helps your heart send blood to the muscles.
  1. Muscle-strengthening activities:
    • What are they: These activities involve having muscles work or hold against a force or some weight.
      • Examples: push-ups, sit-ups, lunges, squats, lifting weights, and working with resistance bands, a good game of tug-of-war, gymnastics, swinging on the monkey bars, and climbing a tree!
    • How often: at least 3 days a week
    • How they help: Having strong muscles makes it easier to do everyday tasks. These activities help your balance, coordination, and posture.
  1. Bone-strengthening:
    • What are they: These activities involve an impact (often with the ground) or tension force.
      • Examples: running, brisk walking, dancing, stair climbing, tennis, basketball, and volleyball are great for your bones, as are hopping, skipping, and jumping
    • Bonus: Many bone-strengthening activities may also help strengthen your muscles and your heart.
    • How often: at least 3 days a week
    • How they help: Make bones grow and get stronger.

 

Being fit helps your body and your mind. Physical activity helps you to be more alert and helps with your moods. Being fit will help you feel better now and in the future. Let’s get moving today!

Today’s 4-H Journal

Yours in Health,

Daily Dose- Earth Day: For the Health of Our Planet

In 1970, fifty years ago, people around the world celebrated the first Earth Day on April 22. Earth Day began as a day of education about environmental issues.

What was going on 50 years ago that prompted this observance? It appeared that people took the environment for granted. Recycling wasn’t a common practice, certainly not curbside pick-up. Waste from factories ended up in the air, lakes, and rivers, which made for unsafe and unhealthy conditions. But then in the 1960s, Americans started to become aware of how pollution affected the environment.

By the end of the decade, the damage done by an oil spill in California and a fire on the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio, brought the environment to the forefront.

The first Earth Day mobilized millions of Americans for the protection of our planet (an estimated 20 million Americans, 10% of the population at the time, took part). Earth Day was a catalyst for change. During the 1970s, important pieces of environmental legislation were passed to protect air, water, and land. You can read more about the history of Earth Day here.

a group of girls holding a sign

I learned about the environment though my involvement in a youth organization (Girl Scouts). That’s me, first row, second from left.

I was in high school in 1970. At the time, there was no curbside recycling like there is now in many communities. My Girl Scout troop collected glass and paper for recycling, which we brought to a business that actually paid us per pound (it was one of our troop’s fundraisers). We did trail clean ups, living by the mantra “leave a place better than you found it.” It didn’t matter that we didn’t throw that trash on the ground; it was our responsibility to pick it up. I know that participating in these activities shaped my attitudes and behaviors toward the environment to this day.

This year we can’t gather in person to participate in Earth Day activities. But that doesn’t mean our concern for the environment goes away. You can check out NASA’s website for many Earth Day activities.

Use today’s 4-H Journal Page to think about ways you can keep the environment healthy.

Here are some things I’m trying to do:

  1. Recycling
  2. Using less plastic
  3. Thinking about whether I need something before I buy it
  4. Picking up after myself and picking up trash when I see it

Here are some other action ideas.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

(Margaret Mead)

Earth Day reminds us that humans have an impact on the environment. Earth Day prompts us to ask how we can sustain these positive changes. Earth Day also reminds us that our health depends on our planet’s health.