Help OSU Extension Document the Yield Impacts of the 2019 Planting Delays

By: CFAES Ag Crisis Taskforce

Flooded fieldNormal planting dates for Ohio range from mid-April to the end of May. This season was quite different when planting for both crops was delayed until late May and stretched into June and even July across many parts of Ohio. We found ourselves grasping for any information we could find including 1) how much of an effect late planting dates would have on yield, and 2) what, if anything, we should change in management of these late planted crops. The historical planting date information we did have was somewhat helpful, but we did not have any data on what could happen when planting is delayed into the second half of June nor July. Continue reading

FSA Reported Crop Acreage Update – Over 85,000 PP Acres in Wms. Co.

By:  Stephanie Karhoff

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released updated 2019 acreage data on October 10 disclosing the number of prevented planting acres reported to the Farm Service Agency (FSA).  Ohio had 1,563,240 total reported prevented planting acres.

In Williams County specifically, there were 85,011 total prevented planting acres (3rd highest county). Of these, 40,644 acres were soybeans, and 44,367 were corn.

PP Acres by County as of 10/1/2019

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Over 60,000 Prevented Planting Acres in Williams County

By:  Stephanie Karhoff

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a report yesterday (August 12th) disclosing the number of prevented planting acres reported to the Farm Service Agency (FSA).Countrywide, there were 19.4 million acres that went unplanted this year. Ohio had 1,485,919 prevented planting acres.

In Williams County specifically, there were 60,373 prevented planting acres (9th highest county). Of these, 31,298 acres were soybeans, and 29,074 were corn. There were 638 failed acres of winter wheat, and 117 failed acres of alfalfa (both irrigated and non-irrigated).

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Don’t Leave Mycorrhizae Stranded in Your Prevented Planting Acres

By:  Stephanie Karhoff

What are mycorrhizae?
Mycorrhizae are beneficial fungi that colonize plant roots. They aid plants in scavenging for soil nutrients, by extending the root system via structures called hyphae. In return, plants provide sugars produced during photosynthesis to the mycorrhizae. Continue reading

Considerations for Using Soybeans as a Cover Crop

By:  Laura Lindsey, Ohio State University

From the USDA RMA website (https://www.rma.usda.gov/News-Room/Frequently-Asked-Questions/Prevented-Planting-Flooding):

“Q. Can I plant a cover crop of the same crop I was prevented from planting? Or in other words, can I use the seed I have on hand (corn, soybeans, wheat) to plant a cover crop as long as it’s at a lower seeded rate that qualifies for cover crop?soybean in field

A. Yes. An acceptable cover crop must be generally recognized by agricultural experts as agronomically sound for the area for erosion control or other purposes related to conservation or soil improvement is planted at the recommended seeding rate, etc. The cover crop may be the same crop prevented from planting and may still retain eligibility for a prevented planting payment. The cover crop planted cannot be used for harvest as seed or grain.”

Soybean is an acceptable cover crop as it is agronomically sound for the area for erosion control or other purposes related to conservation or soil improvement.

To optimize the use of soybean as a cover crop, consider the following: Continue reading