Ohio Legislation on the Move

By:  Ellen Essman, This article originally appeared in the Ohio Ag Law Blog on November 14, 2019

We haven’t done a legislative update in a while—so what’s been going on in the Ohio General Assembly? Without further ado, here is an update on some notable ag-related bills that have recently passed one of the houses, been discussed in committee, or been introduced. Continue reading

Registration is open for Farmer and Farmland Owner Income Tax Webinar

By:  Barry Ward, Director, OSU Income Tax Schools

Columbus, Ohio – Are you getting the most from your tax return? Farmers and farmland owners who wish to increase their tax knowledge should consider attending this webinar that will address tax issues specific to this industry. Content focuses on important tax issues and will offer insight into new tax legislation and further guidelines that have been released this year. Continue reading

Event Notice – Local Manure Management Strategies Workshop

Join William County SWCD on November 21 from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. at the Kissel Building for a “Local Manure Management Strategies Workshop.” There is no cost to attend, but reservations are requested for dinner by November 15 to Williams SWCD at 419-636-9395 ext 3. The workshop will include presentations from Bridgewater Dairy, Innovative Ag, Fry Brothers, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture. Continue reading

Your Hay Storage Impacts Quality and Quanity

By:  David Dugan, OSU Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Adams County

Bad bale of hay

Where and how hay is stored can have a huge impact on the quality and quantity that’s available to be used for feed

With the calendar turning to November, and the temperatures dropping below freezing several mornings now, the time to feed hay is near, if not already here. Several have been feeding hay due to the pasture situation following a dry September that included several 90 degree plus days that zapped much of the grass. Continue reading

Farm Bill Meetings to be held across Ohio

This article was orginally posted on the Ohio Ag Manager site.

Click here for complete article with locations of meetings

Ohio State University Extension and the USDA Farm Service Agency in Ohio are partnering to provide a series of educational Farm Bill meetings this winter to help producers make informed decisions related to enrollment in commodity programs. Continue reading

Hay, just how bad is it?

By:  Ted Wiseman and Dean Kreager, OSU Extension

Much of Ohio’s 2019 first cutting grass hay was beyond optimum maturity when it was harvested. Laboratory analysis indicates little if any first cutting has adequate quality to meet the nutritional needs of bred cows in late gestation or lactation.

Much of Ohio’s 2019 first cutting grass hay was beyond optimum maturity when it was harvested. Laboratory analysis indicates little if any first cutting has adequate quality to meet the nutritional needs of bred cows in late gestation or lactation.

You may be thinking enough already with the hay quality talk. Many articles have been sent out on this topic starting before some people even baled their first cutting. Last year a lot of the hay was very poor quality and many animals lost significant weight through the winter. Some animals even died with hay in front of them because the hay did not have enough nutritional value. Hay quality affects all types of livestock but I will concentrate on beef cows since they are less likely to receive supplemental feed than most other animals. Continue reading

Grain Drying Considerations this Fall

By:  Kristina TeBockhorst and Shawn Shouse, Integrated Crop Management News, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

With delayed planting across the state in 2019, it is important to monitor crop development to determine unique grain drying needs this fall.

Potential challenges:

Corn damaged by a freeze before it has reached physiological maturity will create issues of low test-weight, low quality, and high moisture. Even without frost damage, corn that reaches maturity later in the year can still have issues of high moisture with less in-field drying between maturity and harvest. Corn infield drying rate decreases with air temperatures: in September, weekly drying is estimated at 4.5 moisture points per week, and in October, November, and December, this is reduced to 2.5, 1, and 0.5, respectively. Continue reading