Wayne County IPM Notes from the Week of July 19 – 23

Agronomic Crops

Rapid crop growth and development is a common sight around the area in corn and soybean fields. The majority of corn fields have tasseled

Alfalfa field in bloom.

and are beginning to silk. Soybeans are flowering and pod development is starting to occur.

We are beginning to find some foliar diseases affecting corn fields, as well as the continuation of insect damage from flea beetles, grasshoppers, armyworm, and several other pests. Soybeans are still being fed on by a wide variety of foliar pests. Our focus will start to shift to pod feeding pest, such as stink bugs and bean leaf beetles. Read more on Corn and Soybean management decisions.

Potato leaf hoppers are remaining consistent in population in alfalfa fields. We are seeing populations either at or below threshold. Some fields have cases of leaf spot; however, we are not seeing any fields with any severe infections at this time.

Vegetable Crops

Powdery mildew found on a cucurbit plant in a Wayne County field.

The Vegetable Pathology Lab at OARDC has confirmed several more cases of downy mildew, on both cucumbers and cantaloupe. It is important to take steps to either protect your crop or stop the spread of any ongoing infections. Powdery mildew is also spreading rapidly through the area. Although some heavy rains may have slowed its spread, favorable conditions have led to some fields rapidly becoming infected.

Flea beetles feeding on young green cabbage plants.

Bacterial diseases continue to spread in pepper and tomato plantings. Pay close attention to these crops in particular, and make sure that you are taking the necessary precautions so as to not spread bacterial diseases. Bacteria can be spread from plant to plant via clothing, equipment, or animals. More from APS

Flea beetles are feeding heavily on recently planted cole crops, which left uncontrolled can cause stunted and underperforming plants. Another insect we have seen quite a few of is the squash vine borer. Although these are not typically going to harm large numbers of plants, they can still be a nuisance, especially in smaller plantings.

Small Fruit and Orchards

 This week we found our first incidence of scab in apples. While this was only an isolated find on a few leaves, it is a good reminder to take some time to scout your apple trees and look for any signs of scab. Oriental fruit moth numbers were significantly above threshold again this week. Japanese beetles were also

Severe damage from Japanese beetles feeding on the foliage of apple trees.

still feeding heavily in many of the fruit crops we scout. Spotted wing drosophila are still being found in all of our traps, and for anyone with small fruit in the area, it is recommended that you treat for SWD.

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