Annotated Bibliography – 3 Additional Sources

Greenfield, D., & Wilson, S. (2019, June 19). Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: Applications, implications, and limitations. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2019/artificial-intelligence-in-medicine-applications-implications-and-limitations/.

This source talks about the current possible applications, as well as the limitations, of artificial intelligence in healthcare and the medical field. It also discusses the implications for the future, which are vast in scope due to the exponential way that technology is advancing each and every day (and advancements build upon themselves). The authors are students at Harvard University, and although they’re students, it’s safe to assume that they are still credible as a source of information since they are studying biology. I chose this source because it talks about current applications of artificial intelligence in healthcare and how artificial intelligence can be used to help surgeons and doctors. The source is relevant as it was written in 2019, which means it reflects new data and research. I found this source by doing a Google Scholar search using the term “artificial intelligence”. This is hosted on the Harvard University blog.

Jiang, F., Jiang, Y., Zhi, H., Dong, Y., Li, H., Ma, S., … Wang, Y. (2017). Artificial intelligence in healthcare: past, present and future. Stroke and Vascular Neurology2(4). doi: 10.1136/svn-2017-000101

This source talks about how the use of artificial intelligence in healthcare and medical practices has evolved throughout history. The authors are researchers in several top Chinese universities, so it is safe to assume that they are knowledgeable about the topic. This, therefore, makes the source reliable. I chose this source because there are discussions within the text of the future of artificial intelligence in healthcare, which is a topic that I am particularly interested in delving deep into for my paper. The source is relevant as it was written in 2017, which makes the information rather recent. Additionally, it discusses the past, present, and projected future of artificial intelligence, so the information is not outdated but instead a prediction based on past and present trends. I found this source by doing a Google Scholar search using the term “artificial intelligence”. This is hosted in a journal called Stroke and Vascular Neurology.

Strait, W. J. E. (2019, January 8). Artificial intelligence and the future of medicine. Retrieved November 21, 2019, from https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/artificial-intelligence-and-the-future-of-medicine/.

This source talks about how advancements in artificial intelligence and the technology associated with it could lead to many changes to the future of the medical field. The author is a writer at the Washington University in St. Louis, and even though they are a freelance writer first and foremost, their writing mainly revolves around biology and medicine, so I believe that they are still a credible source. I chose this source because it talks about the future artificial intelligence in the medical field and how the scope of medicine can be changed entirely by developments in technology. The source is relevant as it was written in 2018, so it’s recent and most, if not all, of the material shouldn’t be outdated. This is hosted on the Washington University blog.

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