The Annual Pumpkin Field Day Goes Virtual!

For over 20 years the pumpkin field day held at the Western Ag Research Station in South Charleston has hosted growers from around the state giving them a wide array of production and pest management research, demonstration, tips and tricks. Instead of driving over to the research station, participate virtually from your home, business or favorite coffee house / brewery!

Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, we won’t be able to hold a field day in person this year, but we are working hard to bring you the results of several demonstration and research projects via a pre-recorded video stream that will air on the OSU IPM YouTube channel on August 27 at 6 PM.

Registration for the virtual event will be necessary so we can send out the viewing links between August 26-27 for the roughly hour long field day. Please register at the link below by the deadline of August 25 at 8PM.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/vpumpkin2020

Presentations will include a late season weed screen including an update on the new Reflex herbicide label from Tony Dobbels; Celeste Welty will talk about managing key pumpkin pests; and Jim Jasinski will give updates on powdery mildew fungicides and on the mustard cover crop biofumigation project.

We are also preparing a video to highlight all of the pumpkin and squash hybrids in the variety trial. As a special encore, will be releasing a 3D field scale model of the pumpkin hybrid trial to allow participants to “walk” around in the field virtually, looking at the foliage and fruit of each hybrid in the trial. Here is a small sample of the 3D environment:

https://mpembed.com/show/?m=h5pvoP8inMs&mpu=454

3D field scale model of pumpkin hybrid trial – doll house view.

Brooke Beam will help manage the process by stitching together the short video presentations into one coherent movie which will be approximately 60 minutes long. Contact Jim Jasinski (jasinski.4@osu.edu) for more information or details. Hope to see you on August 27!

Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training in Southern Ohio

The Ohio Department of Agriculture, Division of Food Safety is announcing a Produce Safety Alliance (PSA) Grower Training to be held on January 28, 2020 at the Clermont County OSU Extension Office, 1000 Locust St, Owensville, OH 45160. The training will be one day, 9AM-5PM with an hour for lunch(not provided). There is no cost for in state residents, $85 for out of state. Regulation excluded and exempt growers are also welcome to register for the training.

The PSA Grower Training Course is one way to satisfy the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirement outlined in § 112.22(c) which states ‘At least one supervisor or responsible party for your farm must have successfully completed food safety training at least equivalent to that received under standardized curriculum recognized as adequate by the Food and Drug Administration.’

The course will cover basic produce safety; worker health, hygiene, and training; soil amendments; wildlife, domesticated animals, and land use; agricultural water (both production and postharvest); postharvest handling and sanitation; and developing a farm food safety plan. As a participant you can expected to gain a basic understanding of: microorganisms relevant to produce safety and where they may be found on the farm; how to identify microbial risks, practices that reduce risks; how to begin implementing produce safety practices on the farm; parts of a farm food safety plan and how to begin writing one; and requirements in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule and how to meet them. There will be time for questions and discussion, so participants should come prepared to share their experiences and produce safety questions.

To receive a completion certificate, a participant must be present for the entire training and submit the appropriate paperwork to their trainer at the end of the course.

Registrations to be submitted by January 17, 2020 (ASAP):

Email: Jordyn.Brown@agri.ohio.gov

Fax: (614) 644-0720

Phone: (614) 728-6250

Mail: Ohio Department of Agriculture

Division of Food Safety – ATTN: Jordyn Brown

8995 E Main St

Reynoldsburg, OH 43068

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at (614)600-4272 or mfout@agri.ohio.gov.

Regards,

Matt Fout

Produce Safety Manager, Division of Food Safety

Ohio Department of Agriculture

Specialty Crop Conference

Registration is now open for this annual and newly expanded event.

The ​Southern Ohio ​Specialty ​Crop ​Conference ​is ​the ​most ​diverse ​training ​opportunity ​for ​specialty ​crop ​growers ​in ​Southern ​Ohio. ​An ​a ​la ​carte ​menu ​of ​classes ​allows ​participants ​to ​pick ​and ​choose ​throughout ​the ​day, ​finding ​topics ​that ​interest ​them ​most. ​Pesticide ​credits ​are ​available ​for ​Core, ​Category ​3 ​(Fruits ​& ​Vegetables) ​and ​Category ​5 ​(Greenhouse).

​A ​continental ​breakfast, ​buffet ​lunch ​and ​USB ​memory ​stick ​with ​all ​of ​the ​available ​conference ​handouts ​are ​included ​as ​a ​part ​of ​your ​registration ​fee. ​ ​

Click here for registration and additional information.

Good and Bad Birds on the Farm

Do you have a bird problem on your farm?  Do you want to encourage beneficial birds as an IPM tool? If so, consider attending this free webinar.  Registration information below:

Webinar: Supporting Beneficial Birds and Managing Pest Birds

Supporting Beneficial Birds and Managing Pest Birds

Webinar: Tuesday, October 1 at 11AM Pacific, 12PM Mountain, 1PM Central, 2PM Eastern Time

Register in advance at https://oregonstate.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Yey2HdAZQ8S3CSKUuR8FIg

Join eOrganic for the first webinar of our fall season! The topic is Supporting Beneficial Birds and Managing Pest Birds, by Jo Ann Baumgartner of the Wild Farm Alliance, Sara Kross of Columbia University, and Sacha Heath of the Living Earth Collaborative.

Beneficial birds can help farmers keep pest insects, rodents, and pest birds at bay. They act the same way that beneficial insects do in helping with pest control. The overwhelming majority of songbirds are beneficial during nesting season because they feed pest insects to their voracious nestlings. Farmers may be able to reduce their pest-control costs by providing habitat for these beneficial birds and by only targeting detrimental birds at the right time and place. Wild Farm Alliance and two avian ecologists will present on: a) How birds’ diets, foraging strategies, and nesting periods affect the farm, b) How best to manage and co-exist with pest birds, c) Why on-farm habitat and the surrounding landscape influences pest control, and, d) What farmers can do to make farms more bird-friendly and resilient. With this webinar and the associated Supporting Beneficial Birds and Managing Pest Birds booklet, we aim to help all farmers and farm consultants make the most of birds on farms.

Hardin County Crop Walk

There is a segment of agriculture in southeastern Hardin County that specializes in commercial fruit and vegetable production.  Hardin County is also home to the Scioto Valley Produce Auction near Mt. Victory where much of this produce is sold.  Hardin County OSU Extension has planned a Fruit and Vegetable Crop Walk program on Tuesday, July 23 from 6:00-8:00 pm to help with fruit and vegetable production issues.  The location of the program will be on a produce farm at 17051 Township Road 199, Mt. Victory.  It is open to all fruit and vegetable producers, whether they are commercial or home gardeners.

OSU plant pathologist Dr. Sally Miller will provide information on managing plant diseases with vegetables.  OSU plant pathologist Melanie Ivey will provide information on managing plant diseases with fruits.  Hardin County OSU Extension Educator Mark Badertscher will provide information about Driftwatch.  Driftwatch is a voluntary communication tool that enables crop producers, beekeepers, and pesticide applicators to work together to protect specialty crops and apiaries through use of mapping programs.  It is not a substitute for any state regulatory requirements.

The program will be held outside so bring your lawn chair and umbrella in case of rain.  There will be a diagnostic table so be sure to bring along any weeds, plant nutrition problems, plant diseases, and insect specimens in a sealed plastic bag for questions and answers.  The program will conclude with a walk through a produce patch and high tunnel greenhouse, pointing out fruit and vegetable issues and steps to properly manage them.  There is no cost to attend this event.

More and Better Tools to Help Respond Effectively to Weather-related Challenges

A vegetable farmer pointed out to me recently that “rain” is a four-letter word and that like other ones, he likes rain to fall in just the right amount and at just the right time. Well, although we can’t control when, where, or how much rain will fall, many people in agriculture and the area known as climate services are working to develop reliable forecasts of and effective responses to current and future weather.

Shared commitments to that goal were evident throughout the recent Climate Services Summit (https://climate.osu.edu/news/byrd-center-hosts-ohio-climate-services-summit) coordinated by the State Climate Office of Ohio based at The OSU (https://climate.osu.edu/). Just as important, steps to providing farmers and others with better decision-aids also became clearer through discussions at the program. Ohio State University Extension contributes to the process – for example, see resources, programs, and input offered by Aaron Wilson, Jason Cervenec, and John Fulton – and addressing weather-related challenges and needs of vegetable growers will be important going forward. These were summarized well in two recent reports (https://www.climatehubs.oce.usda.gov/archive/sites/default/files/Midwest_Climate_And_Specialty_Crops_2015_508.pdf and https://store.extension.iastate.edu/product/15448) but more input is always welcome.

Throughout much of this field planting season, many have needed to scramble, improvise, and work round the clock to get work done as weather, soil, labor, and other conditions allowed. It seems that most have experienced the dark side of their share of passing fronts, with few farms experiencing clear skies and calm winds for extended periods. Overall, this seems consistent with information in http://glisa.umich.edu/media/files/GLISA%202%20Pager%202019.pdf (GLISA also participated in the recent Summit). Field and high tunnel plantings have been affected in their own ways by recent conditions, although it is fair to say that most high tunnel plantings were able to remain on schedule, an important early step toward a successful season. Ideally, we will soon see that high tunnels are just one of many key tools available to help maintain and enhance vegetable production amidst changing and increasingly extreme conditions.

Practical Skills for Managing Invasive Insects Workshop

Adult spotted lanternfly. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org

Join members of the OSU Department of Entomology and the OSU IPM Program for a workshop that highlights recent research results and reviews the latest recommendations for key practices in monitoring, identifying, and managing the spotted-wing Drosophila and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug on fruit and vegetable crops. Although the spotted lanternfly has not yet been found in Ohio, this invasive pest has been detected in nearby states, so we’ll provide some tips to remain vigilant for this potentially new pest.

The workshop will be held Tuesday, March 26 at OSU’s Waterman Farm (2490 Carmack Road Columbus, OH 43210) in the Wittmeyer Conference Room in the Headquarters Building, from 9 AM – noon. The agenda is not yet finalized but will be modeled after the following outline:

Brown marmorated stink bug on apple.  

Spotted-Wing Drosophila, on berry crops
-Overview of distribution and biology
-Key advances in monitoring, identification & management
-New streamlined approach to monitoring in 2019
-Additional Resources

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, on fruit & vegetable crops
-Overview of distribution and biology
-Key advances in monitoring & management
-Biological control update
-Additional Resources

 

Spotted Lanternfly, potentially on tree fruit & hop crops

Spotted wing Drosophila male (L) and female (R).

-Overview of distribution and biology
-Monitoring techniques
-Management decisions / options
-Additional Resources

Coffee and light snacks will be served. Registration will cost $5 per person and be limited to only 35 attendees due to room constraints. All participants must pre-register using this link (https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OSUinvasive). Registration will end March 22nd.  Payment, cash or check, will be accepted at the door.

If you have any difficulties registering or have other questions, please contact Jim Jasinski, jasinski.4@osu.eduor 937-484-1526, or Celeste Welty, welty.1@osu.edu, 614-292-2803.

Specialty Crop Growers’ Roundtable at OARDC

Winter is a time for many activities, including obtaining new information and reconnecting with friends, peers, and partners. All these activities and more happen at programs coordinated by grower associations, universities, and others. In that light, consider participating in the upcoming Specialty Crop Growers’ Roundtable on February 4, 2019 at the OARDC in Wooster, OH.

Every program has something to offer. The Roundtable will offer brief, to-the-point presentations, demonstrations, exhibits, and trainings, and ample time for one-on-one and small group discussion — great value for commercial vegetable, fruit, and herb growers, especially ones active in local to regional markets. There will be plenty to hear, see, say, and do at the Roundtable. Please note: attendance is capped at 50 and pre-registration is required.

Learn more about the Roundtable program, including how to register. specialty-crop-roundtable-19-flyer-for-distribution-1-2j2bze6

The 2019 Ohio Produce Network Program: Count on It

The upcoming Ohio Produce Network program (http://www.opgma.org/ohio-produce-network/) sponsored by Ohio Produce Growers and Marketers Association will be held on January 16-17, 2019 at the Embassy Suites in Dublin, OH. Topics selected by growers during months of event preparation will be addressed in presentations, demonstrations and trainings, discussions, and displays and exhibits.

The program has five tracks and begins with the OPGMA Annual Meeting and Keynote Address. The Keynote Address will be given by Liliana Esposito, who serves as the Chief Communications Officer with Wendy’s. The entire program includes eleven hours and of presentation and discussion time across five tracks (55 hours total) plus five hours dedicated to viewing the tradeshow and various exhibits and participating in trainings and demonstrations.

Combined, the Vegetable, Food Safety, and Greenhouse/High Tunnel tracks also comprise interesting numbers. For example, they include twenty-nine speakers and at least that many topics. Of these twenty-nine speakers, thirteen are with a university (three institutions), five are farmers, eight represent farming-related businesses, two represent organizations, and one represents the ODA. These numbers are matched by equally impressive ones across the Fruit and Marketing tracks. However, for now, the most important numbers to remember are 5100 Upper Metro Place, Dublin, OH 43017 … the address of the OPN program and where we hope to see you on January 16 and 17!

Grower, Gardener, Educator, and Researcher – All can Gain from Vegetable Grafting

Grafting is an ancient technology currently coming of age, helping vegetable growers and gardeners and educators and researchers in Ohio and the U.S. address some of today’s most significant challenges. Find out more at two upcoming programs.

The Muck Crops School on January 10 in Willard, OH will include a presentation by grafting expert Dr. Richard Hassell of Clemson University. He will outline progress made in developing rootstock (RS) varieties resistant to Phytopthora capsici, a devastating disease of pepper, tomato, melon, and other major vegetable crops. In grafting, root systems of RS varieties are spliced to the shoots of scion varieties, creating physical hybrids that often out-perform ungrafted versions of the scion variety, especially under stressful conditions. Indeed, creating physical hybrids opens key opportunities in production, research, and education. Contact OSUE-Huron County (https://huron.osu.edu/home) about attending the Muck Crops School on Jan 10, 2019.

The Ohio Produce Network program on January 16-17 in Dublin, OH will include two sessions on grafting, both occurring on January 16. Session 1 will feature presentations and discussion led by six additional experts: Dr. Chris Gunter (NCSU), Dr. Matt Kleinhenz (The OSU), Dr. Sally Miller (The OSU), Cameron Way (Way Farms), Chuck Mohler (Sweet Corn Charlie Farms), and Ed Kerlikowske (http://lifegivingfruit.com/). A representative of TriHishtil (http://www.trihishtil.com/), a major supplier of grafted plants, may also participate. Together, the six presenters and discussion leaders will provide a comprehensive, up-to-date, and stakeholder-focused summary of grafted plants as sources of income and production tools. Session 2, later on Jan 16, will deliver individualized training in making grafted plants, a straightforward process that can be completed in many settings. See http://www.opgma.org/ohio-produce-network/ about attending the OPN on Jan 16-17, 2019.

Contact Matt Kleinhenz (330.263.3810, kleinhenz.1@osu.edu) for additional information about these programs and see http://www.vegetablegrafting.org/ and http://u.osu.edu/vegprolab/research-areas/grafting-2/ for more information about vegetable grafting.