USDA Designates Brown and Clermont Counties in Ohio, as Primary Natural Disaster Areas

 WASHINGTON, Nov. 4, 2022 –This Secretarial natural disaster designation allows the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) to extend much-needed emergency credit to producers recovering from natural disasters through emergency loans. Emergency loans can be used to meet various recovery needs including the replacement of essential items such as equipment or livestock, the reorganization of a farming operation or the refinance of certain debts. FSA will review the loans based on the extent of losses, security available, and repayment ability.

Impacted Area: Ohio

Triggering Disaster: Excessive rainfall occurred from May 1 through June 16, 2022.

Application Deadline: May 29, 2023

Primary Counties Eligible: Brown and Clermont

Contiguous Counties Also Eligible:

In Ohio: Adams, Clinton, Hamilton, Highland, and Warren

In Kentucky: Bracken, Campbell, Mason, and Pendleton

More Resources

On farmers.gov, the Disaster Assistance Discovery ToolDisaster Assistance-at-a-Glance fact sheet, and Farm Loan Discovery Tool can help you determine program or loan options. To file a Notice of Loss or to ask questions about available programs, contact your local  USDA Service Center.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

Women in Agriculture Series

Agriculture is becoming more complex every year with more technology, changing genetics, higher costs of production, worldwide market impacts, environmental shifts, labor issues, and the list goes on and on. It is also an exciting time for agriculture for many of the same reasons.  As part of the family farming operation, where do you see your role?

This high-impact series is designed to provide women with tools to improve their risk management skills in the complex, dynamic world of agriculture. We invite you to attend one, or all the programs we have planned.  Come for some great discussion, fellowship, and learning.

These events are free to those attending. This program is designed for great discussion and learning. We will have dessert and other refreshments each evening.

Wednesday, November 30, 2022 –  Peggy Hall – OSU Ag Law Specialist, Open discussion to address your Ag law questions and concerns

Wednesday, January 11, 2023 –  Robert Moore – OSU Ag Law Specialist, Succession planning thoughts for the family farm operation

Tuesday, January 17, 2023 –  Kaitlin Roush – Clinton Co. FSA Director, Farm Program Update and Discussion

Location: Clinton Co Extension Community Room, 111 S. Nelson Avenue, Wilmington, OH

Time each night:  6:30 to 8:00 PM

Brochure

Make your reservation by calling our office at (937) 382-0901 and let us know what nights you will be attending.

Spread the word – this event is open to anyone.

For More Information Contact: Tony Nye – at 937-382-0901 or nye.1@osu.edu 

2022 Ohio Maple Day

We are fast approaching the date for the 2022 Ohio Maple Day event.  Join us on Dec. 10th at Ashland University’s John C. Meyer Convocation Center for a jam-packed program on all things maple.  Updates on red maple research from both Ohio State’s Gabe Karns and the University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center’s Abby van den Berg.  Add to this other talks on reverse osmosis, marketing, and insects impacting maple trees.

A maple-themed lunch and a vendor room that features a variety of maple equipment dealers, consulting foresters, and other associated equipment help round out the day.  There are also SAF continuing education credits available for the program.

You can register here

We hope to see you there!

Spotted Lanternfly and the Potential Impacts on the Maple Syrup Industry

There will be a free webinar on November 16, 2022, at 10:00 AM EST, titled Spotted Lanternfly and the Potential Impacts on the Maple Syrup Industry.

Extension Educator Brian Walsh, Penn State Extension, will discuss what is known about the spotted lanternfly and observations about maple trees that provide insight as to the impact the insect could have on the industry.

Ever since the spotted lanternfly was found in Southeast Pennsylvania, it has been causing damage to agricultural plants as well as non-agricultural plants. As the insect continues to expand its range, more is being learned about the insect’s lifecycle and its feeding habitats. Since the spotted lanternfly can feed very heavily upon certain tree species, the insect can potentially impact the maple syrup industry.

Click this link to register:  https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly-and-the-potential-impacts-on-the-maple-syrup-industry

Mental Health First Aid ®

Do you know how to identify signs of worsening mental health in adults?
Would you know how to respond and provide support if someone was experiencing a mental health crisis?

In Ohio, 16 of the 17 counties with the highest rates of suicide are rural. Behind every number is a person who was a friend, family member, colleague, or neighbor. Sign up for Mental Health First Aid training and learn how to recognize signs and symptoms of mental health challenges in adults and how to help in a mental health crisis.

How this course works:

  • Register to attend at: https://go.osu.edu/farmstress22mhfa
  • Complete 1.5 hours of self-paced learning online (access to materials provided approximately two weeks prior to training)
  • Attend an interactive and engaging virtual training hosted on Zoom.

FLYER

Upcoming Trainings:

Sept. 29
Oct. 7 or 27
November 4
December 2

This course is valued at $170 but is FREE thanks to funding from a USDA FRSAN grant.*

*This research was supported by the intramural research program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, 7 U.S.C 5936, Section 7522 of FCEA of 2008, Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network (FRSAN).

The “letter of intent” for solar and wind energy development: considerations for landowners

Solar and wind energy development is thriving in Ohio, and most of that development will occur on leased farmland.  Programs in the newly enacted federal Inflation Reduction Act might amplify renewable energy development even more. The decision to lease land for wind and solar development is an important one for a farmland owner, and one […]

Read more of this post

Landowner crop lease termination deadline is September 1

September 1 is fast approaching, and this year it’s an especially important date for landowners leasing cropland under an existing lease that doesn’t address when or how the lease terminates.  In those situations, September 1 is the new deadline established in Ohio law for a landowner to notify a tenant that the landowner wants to terminate the lease.  If the landowner does not provide notice by September 1, the lease continues for another lease term. Read more of this post

Kitchen Table Conversations at the Farm Science Review

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension’s Ohio Women in Agriculture Program announces opportunities to Learn, Grow, Connect, Inspire and Empower at the 2022 Farm Science Review!

Some of the best conversations and discussions have occurred around the family kitchen table. Grab a cup of your favorite beverage, lunch, or snack and join us from our kitchen table or yours to engage in conversations in-person or “virtually” on September 20, 21, and 22, 2022 for “Kitchen Table Conversations” hosted by the Ohio Women in Agriculture of Ohio State University Extension.

These sessions are offered during the Farm Science Review daily from 11:30 AM-12:30 PM. In-person sessions will be located on the north side of the Firebaugh Building at 384 Friday Avenue at our kitchen table. ZOOM session registration is required to participate. Register @ https://go.osu.edu/2022fsrkitchentableconversation

Programs will focus on key topics related to health, marketing, finance, legal, and production for women in agriculture.  Each topic will feature a leading expert and moderators to generate dialogue and empower discussion among participants.  A list of daily topics and leaders is provided below.

TUESDAY

When Death Happens- Managing the Farm Without Your Business Partner

Death can change everything, especially your ability to manage the farm without your business partner.  How can you better prepare to manage your farm business without your spouse or sibling?  Learn some strategies that can help you plan for the challenge of managing a farm alone.

SPEAKER: David Marrison, OSU Extension Educator, Coshocton County

WEDNESDAY

Female Farmer Financing Options: Opportunities with USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Loans

Come participate in this kitchen table conversation on how you can find unique farmland financing options for females, veterans, and minority farmers. Learn a little bit more about the requirements, normal rates, and roles.

SPEAKER: Eric Richer, OSU Extension Educator, Fulton County

THURSDAY

The Devil is in the Details: Communication and Record Keeping for Improving Farm Management

Family farms are only as good as their communication.  A record-keeping system is a valuable form of communication when the level of detail fits the needs of the farm decision-makers.  Useful record keeping can move a farm management team beyond the basic tax return to exploring problem-solving and strengthening the family farm business.

SPEAKER: Bruce Clevenger, OSU Extension Educator, Defiance County

Your host for the event will be Extension Professionals of the OSU Extension Ohio Women in Agriculture Team. Visit our display inside the Firebaugh Building for additional women in agriculture opportunities.

For more information: Gigi Neal, neal.331@osu.edu, 513-732-7070 or Heather Neikirk, neikirk.2@osu.edu, 234-348-6145

Blog site: u.osu.edu/ohwomeninag

Organic Certification Cost Share Available from Farm Service Agency

Have you ever considered transitioning all or part of your dairy or crop enterprise to organic production?  If so, you may be interested in programs available through your local Farm Service Agency (FSA).  These include the Organic Certification Cost Share Program (OCCSP) and the Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program (OTECP). 

Organic Certification Cost Share 

The Organic Certification Cost Share Program (OCCSP) provides cost-share assistance to producers and handlers who are obtaining organic certification for the first time or renewing their previous certification. Organic certification is obtained through certifying agents accredited by the USDA National Organic Program. 

This program provides 50 percent of a certified operation’s allowable certification costs, up to a maximum of $500.  The following categories or “scopes” are included: crops, livestock, wild crops, processing/handling, and organic program fees. Cost share is provided on a first-come, first-served basis until all available funds are obligated.  This program is available until September 30, 2022. 

To be eligible, a producer must have both (1) a valid organic certification for their operation at the time of application and (2) paid fees or expenses related to its initial certification or renewal for certification from a certifying agent.  

Allowable costs under the OCCSP include: 

  • Application fees and administrative fees 
  • Inspection fees, including travel and per diem for organic inspectors 
  • USDA organic certification costs 
  • User fees or sale assessments 
  • Postage 

Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program 

The Organic and Transitional Education and Certification Program (OTECP) provides financial assistance to producers interested in obtaining or renewing USDA organic certification.  In addition to many acronyms, there are certain terms that producers need to know the definitions.  These include certified operation, educational event, soil testing, micronutrients, transitional operation, and USDA organic certification.  These terms are defined below: 

  • Certified operation – is a crop or livestock production, wild crop harvesting, or handling operation, or portion of such operation, that is certified by an accredited certifying agent. 
  • An educational event – is an event, conference, training program, or workshop, that provides educational content addressing topics related to organic production and handling. 
  • Soil testing – means soil testing to document micronutrient deficiencies. 
  • Micronutrients – can not be used as a defoliant, herbicide, or desiccant.  Those made from nitrates or chlorides are not allowed.  Deficiencies must be documented by soil or tissue testing. 
  • Transitional operation – is a crop or livestock production operation that is transitioning to organic production in anticipation of obtaining USDA organic certification and has an organic system plan from a certifying agent. 
  • USDA organic certification – means a determination made by a certifying agent that a production or handling operation is in compliance with the Organic Production Act of 1990. 

Eligibility  

To be eligible for OTECP, an applicant must have paid eligible costs during the program year and, at the time of application, be either a certified or a transitional operation.  Expenses that have been incurred during the program year but not paid by the applicant are not eligible for cost-share assistance.  Eligibility for the OTECP is based on the date expenses are paid, rather than on the date the organic certification is effective.  

Eligible Categories 

Certified Organic Operations may have expenses for any combination of the following categories: crops, wild crops, livestock, handling/processing, program fees, soil testing, and educational events. 

Transitional Organic Operations may have expenses for any combination of transitional operation, soil testing, and educational events. 

Payment Amounts & Limitations  

Eligible Applicants  Category of Expenses  Payment Amount 
Certified operations  Certification – crops  25%, up to $250 
Certified operations  Certification – livestock  25%, up to $250 
Certified operations  Certification – wild crops  25%, up to $250 
Certified operations  Certification – handling  25%, up to $250 
Certified operations  State Organic Program fees  25%, up to $250 
Transitional Operations  Eligible transitional expenses  75%, up to $750 
Certified & Transitional Operations  Educational event registration fees  75%, up to $100 
Certified & Transitional Operations  Soil testing  75%, up to $150 

 

Required Documentation 

 In addition to dividing expenses paid by category, applicants self-certify to having either a valid organic certificate or documentation to show a transition to organic.  Applicants must retain documentation in support of their application for three years after the date of approval. 

 Additional Information 

 If you are interested in learning more about this or other Farm Service Agency programs, contact your local FSA office.  Not sure which FSA serves your county?  Use this link (https://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/app) to locate your nearest FSA office. 

These OSU Extension resources may be of interest: 

 https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/sag-3  

 https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/anr-34  

For Ohio-specific information about the organic certification process, consult the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association: https://certification.oeffa.org/ 

 

Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County