Scarlet Scramble is Back

Did you know University Hall is the real building used as Hollis College in Pretty Little Liars? Or that the first Wendy’s restaurant ever opened was in Columbus? Do you think you can eat a stack of Sloopy’s pancakes faster than anyone else? Then boy do I have an event for you — Scarlet Scramble 2015 is here!

So what is Scarlet Scramble?

It’s a 24-hour campus and city adventure that includes challenges, trivia questions, and clues to decode. Teams compete from 6 p.m. on March 27 to 6 p.m. on March 28 to earn points and win prizes (like Amazon and HOMAGE gift cards). The Scramble is brought to you by First Year Experience, and each team should have at least five first year students, but can have up to five other students (non first-years) too.

You know you want a new HOMAGE shirt.

You know you want a new HOMAGE shirt.

I participated in my first Scarlet Scramble my freshman year and have helped plan it the last two years. It is one of my favorite events on campus because not only do you get a sweet T-shirt just for signing up, you also get to run around campus with your friends, learn something new while you’re doing it, and compete for prizes! Plus you end up with some pretty cool pictures like these.

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2013

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2013

TBT to Scar Scram 2014

TBT to Scarlet Scramble 2014

To learn more about #ScarScram2015, check out the video below!

Registration is open until March 9. To sign up for the best time of your life visit fye.osu.edu/scarletscramble.

See you March 27!

It’s Not Too Late to Join a Student Org!

After already completing your first semester at Ohio State, some of you may feel it is too late to get involved on campus.

While some students get involved right away, many students choose to focus on their classwork when they first come to school, and choose not to have outside distractions. With all of the changes and adjustments, your first semester is often more overwhelming than many would assume.

While some dive in with full force, many choose to test the water first!

After the rush of Welcome Week, and the fall and spring involvement fairs, you may fear it is pointless or too late to join an organization partway through the year. However, it is not too late take that jump!

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As a matter of fact, many organizations are still seeking or recruiting members! We’ve talked to a few organization leaders from across campus who can provide a bit more information about some of these available and awesome opportunities.

 

I. American Association of University Women

Name: Cassidy Horency

Status: Currently seeking new members

We are a new organization on campus and this is only our second semester, so we are looking for more people! It’s part of a national organization and members can apply for scholarships and grants through it. We usually have pizza. It’s better late than never to join an organization.

II. Buck-I-Serv

Name: Allie Loughry

Status: Currently seeking new members

First-year students should apply for a summer Buck I Serv trip because it’s a great way to give back to the community, spread the Buckeye spirit and meet new people!

III. DanceSport

Name: Jessica Gregory

Status: Currently seeking new members

It’s a great way to meet new people and meet people with similar interests. Members can benefit from this organization because you learn how to dance tons of different ballroom dances and can take your new skills to places around Columbus like La Fogata, which has salsa dancing nights. We are constantly growing and looking for new members.

IV. Delta Sigma Phi fraternity

Name: Alec Wuorinen

Status: Currently seeking new members

Great way to meet new people (lots!) and learn great things about yourself. With more friendships comes greater diverse connections!

V. Institute of Industrial Engineers

Name: Gunnar Smyth

Status: Currently seeking new members

All Industrial Engineering students should join because we go to both the regional and national conference to meet other IEs, learn about the major, and connect you to job opportunities. Leadership positions are available.

VI. John Glenn Civic Leadership Council

Name: Andy Krupin

Status: Currently seeking new members

We host a wide range of meeting activities! There’s something for everyone. Between current events jeopardy and different service projects, the CLC is a great way to learn about your community and make a difference in it, too. The more people we have, the bigger potential impact we can make.

VII. Muslim Students Association

Name: Yousef Yacoub

Status: Currently seeking new members

If you’re a Muslim or interested in Islam, I definitely recommend coming to our weekly general body meetings on Fridays at 6 p.m. in the Interfaith Room on the 3rd floor of the Union, where we host world-renowned Islamic scholars to learn more about the Islamic faith.

VIII. Ohio Staters, Inc.

Name: Joanie Garcia

Status: Currently seeking and recruiting new members

Ohio Staters, Inc. is the oldest student service organization on campus that promotes the welfare and traditions of the university. This org. helps connect students with the deep roots of the university and network with faculty while creating a close community of thinkers, believers, and doers.

IX. Phi Alpha Delta

Name: Leila Khamees

Status: Currently seeking new members

It’s specifically for people interested in law (it’s a pre-law fraternity). We learn if law school is for us, how to apply, what to expect on the LSAT and in law school. Also, we all become super close and have tons in common!

X. Phi Delta Epsilon: Pre-med fraternity

Name: Jenna Murray

Status: Currently recruiting new members (in the fall)

Phi Delta Epsilon is always looking for new members who want community and support through the pre-med process. Meet people who have taken similar classes, form study groups, and be friends!

XI. Psychology Student Ambassadors

Name: Myra Saeed

Status: Currently recruiting new members (for fall)

They should apply to Psych Ambassadors early this semester if they’re psych majors because we do a lot of working with incoming freshmen and program a lot of social and educational events. Also, we’re super tight with the department and that’s awesome!

XII. UNICEF-OSU (United Nations Children’s Fund)

Name: Caroline Tritt

Status: Currently seeking new members

This is a fantastic organization if you’re interested in children’s rights. We educate, advocate, and fundraise on behalf of the U.S. fund for UNICEF to help children in over 190 countries receive an education, get clean drinking water and nutritious foods, immunizations, help with HIV/AIDS, and provide relief in emergency situations. UNICEF is the most efficient humanitarian organization in the world and all the money we raise is doubled through an outside fund! We also talk about current issues affecting children!

 

Just remember:

It’s not too late to find your niche on campus. It’s sometimes less intimidating to join an organization in the winter because fewer events are going on than in the fall! You’ll be able to hit the ground running after summer break!” ~Stephanie Demos

 

To Lead is To Serve

This year, I am part of the STEP program — the Second Year Transformational Experience Program. Sounds fancy, right?

Basically, this program is available to students living on-campus in their second year. You can “apply” by simply checking a box saying you’d like to be a part of the program when you apply for housing. I’m not pressuring you… BUT DO IT!!!

In STEP, you meet with a small group and faculty member weekly to discuss plans and ideas to ultimately receive $2,000 at the end of the year to use toward whatever suits your interests — whether it be to study abroad, take internships, do research — literally anything you can imagine.

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However, what I really want to share is the insight I have gained from my faculty advisor. When I first found out my group’s faculty member was an electrical engineering professor, you could say I wasn’t too thrilled. I am studying psychology and communication with a minor in public health (so basically I don’t know what I want to do with my life, but I do know it’s definitely not electrical engineering), and needless to say, I thought I wouldn’t get much out of his advice. But something that he emphasizes week after week has been stuck in my head lately: to lead is to serve.

This got me thinking. I definitely like to serve; I’m in a service fraternity, am part of the UNICEF club and felt like I was doing a pretty good job of “serving.” But what I’ve come to realize this year is that simply participating, showing up, and being aware is not enough. If we want to make a true impact in this world, we have to go beyond just putting in our hours of service and feeling like a good person because of it. Instead, we have to be engaged, thoughtful, inquisitive, and give a voice to those who cannot be heard.

This could mean creating a new service club focusing on an issue that you are passionate about, this could be recruiting others into your organization by sharing your enthusiasm, or this simply could be teaching others what you have learned in a particular service project and how you think you could make it better the next time.

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When I think more about the idea of to lead is to serve, I think of qualities in a leader that I find to be the most inspiring.

These are:

  1. Passion– I think it’s safe to say that there are no good leaders who lack passion. It takes a special person to be able to inspire an entire crowd with their own passion, and it always gives me the chills.
  2. Authenticity– Basically I see this as “being real.” It’s a person who shares their true self and understands they are human. This type of person is approachable and warm and doesn’t hide parts of themselves depending on the situation.
  3. Participator– I find a leader to be so much more valuable when they are able to practice what they preach. These leaders are involved in the grass roots and exemplify how to make an impact even at this level.
  4. Daring– A real leader is willing to take risks. A real leader is also willing to invest in their people and have faith in their abilities. When an inspiring leader has you take on a big project, you naturally step up to the challenge knowing that your abilities have been trusted.

An important thing to understand is that you do not have to hold a title to be a leader. A leader is someone who actively engages in the world around them, positively impacting the people they cross paths with regardless of whether they hold a special title or not. I encourage you all to reflect on yourselves and what type of impact and legacy you are leaving behind, because that’s all that really matters when it comes down to it, right? You can do it!

Fvgzm

 

6 Themes Not to Miss This Semester

If you’re like us in First Year Experience, you love a good theme. Themes can take an experience from basic to amazing, and that’s why the First Year Success Series has six themes to help you have the best first semester ever. Here’s some insight into each of these themes; hopefully you will see some experiences not to be missed!

Theme #1: Academic Engagement and Career Exploration

To stay at Ohio State, you will need to be successful inside the classroom. College requires you to study smarter, learn faster, and think more critically. Once you have gotten the hang of that, you may also want to think about requirements for graduate school, internships in your field of study, or research with a faculty member. Mastering the content in this theme area grants you the opportunity to continue to explore the rest of the collegiate experience–like Welcome Week.

2014 sessions to consider:

  • A+ Research: Where Do You Start?
  • Is Your Major ‘The One’
  • Where’s Woody? Find Woody Hayes in Thompson Library
  • Study Smarter! Memory Tools for Effective Studying

Theme #2: Diversity and Global Awareness

Ohio State is pretty big–over 7,000 new students started here this fall, contributing to a total population of more than 50,000 students. With a community this size, we have people representing many cultures, genders, races, languages, sexual orientations, religions, nationalities, and experiences. Appreciating diversity means more than trying different foods or taking O-H-I-O pictures on a study abroad trip (although those are cool things that you definitely should do). Being a a member of the Buckeye family means learning about different people so that we can all advocate for each other and celebrate our differences. Sessions in this theme will help you begin to explore new cultures and issues, think about studying abroad, and connecting with others who share your identity.

2014 sessions to consider:

  • Take a Stand: A Guide to Learning about Yourself & Peers
  • Study Abroad Expo
  • How to be an Ally
  • International Coffee Hour

Theme #3: Finances

Few things are worse than getting to the end of your college experience and realizing you made poor financial decisions which will follow you long after your time at Ohio State is over. What can you do to stretch your dollar and be smart about how you plan your budget for the next fours years? Go to sessions in this theme to make smart decisions about financing your time at Ohio State.

2014 sessions to consider:

  • LANDLORDS, LEASING & LOTS MORE: Get the 43201 about Moving Off-Campus!
  • Personal Finance 101
  • Budgeting Workshop
  • Extreme Couponing

Theme #4: Health and Wellness

With all of the work you’ll do to succeed in the classroom and all of the energy you’ll put into making friends and getting involved, it’s important for you to find ways to take care of yourself; that may include eating healthy, making smart social choices, or hitting the gym. There are actually nine dimensions of wellness for you to think about as a student. Sessions in this theme will help you consider how you are taking care of yourself in each dimension to live a healthy lifestyle during your time at Ohio State.

2014 sessions to consider:

  • Party Smart
  • Counting Sheep: How Sleep Impacts Your Success
  • The Right Bite on a College Campus
  • Double Dare

Theme #5: Leadership and Civic Engagement

Were you overwhelmed by all of the opportunities you saw at the Involvement Fair or during Community Commitment? Everyone has told you to get involved, but what will that look like for you? You may want to go to sessions in this theme to think about what your leadership skills and styles look like. Then, you can think about what kinds of issues on campus or in the community matter to you, and commit yourself to those opportunities.

2014 sessions to consider:

  • Your Buckeye Leadership Plan
  • Service in Your First Year Experience
  • Becoming a Nut
  • How to Avoid Poverty Tourism

Theme #6: Buckeye Book Community

All members of the class of 2018 read The Glass Castle this summer…what a great conversation starter at a table in Kennedy Commons! Maybe you and your newfound friend will decide to attend one of the many Success Series sessions where you will have the chance to talk about the themes of the book. The book’s author, Jeannette Walls, comes to campus on September 23!

2014 sessions to consider:

  • An Evening with Jeannette Walls
  • A Different Look at The Glass Castle
  • Pastries and Perspective: The Glass Castle
  • What’s in a question? Research questions and The Glass Castle

Are you ready to check out these themes? Visit go.osu.edu/FYSS and register for your Peer Leader workshop before September 12 to learn more about the First Year Success Series from upperclass students!

The Next Step: Leading in College

February and March are usually an exciting/hectic time for me. Almost everything is due the week before spring break, and you better be studying for that exam you have the week after!

If you’re like I was in my first year, you’ve probably gotten involved in a few student organizations that you are passionate about. You like going to the meetings, but you want to contribute more to the group. As the end of the school year comes around, this might be your chance to take the next step and run for a position! Whether it be a the head of a committee or president of the entire organization, if you’re passionate about the club you are in, don’t be afraid to run! It might be a little intimidating at first, but once you get your foot in the door, you will be glad you did!

After my experience serving as president of an academic honorary this past year, I’ve learned a lot about how leading in college is different from being on prom committee in high school (not that prom wasn’t important; it totally was). Here are my top three tips from my first year as president of a student organization…but these tips can also apply to anyone involved in a student organization (no matter the position)!

1. Get to know people!

In high school, many of us had been with the same kids since at least junior high. In college, you could be leading a group of people you’ve never met before. In the academic honorary system for example, a new class is inducted every year. This can be a tough one right off the bat, but if you don’t know everyone in the organization at least by name, introduce yourself! Friend everyone on Facebook, and be sure you know their face so you can remember their name. The better acquainted you are with the members or committee, the easier communication will be, and more things will get done. 

2. Delegate, delegate, DELEGATE!

Did I say delegate? There can be a steep learning curve when it comes to breaking things up and giving people responsibilities. There isn’t a teacher there to tell you how to run things (like on prom committee). You can’t do everything yourself, and once you try, you will be extremely overwhelmed. Learning to depend on others is one of the most important skills you can take away from being a leader. Collaborate to break up tasks based on convenience, ask for volunteers, and suggest a deadline.

3. Utilize your adviser!

Your student organization adviser will only be as active as you need them to be, but they’ve had experiences with the club in the past and are a wealth of knowledge! When we were planning our annual benefit dance this past February, I started asking my adviser all kinds of questions and wondered why I hadn’t done so before. In the honorary system too, they provide a nice link to past officers and the information they have as well. If anything, they’re a great listening ear as well!

Don’t be afraid to run for a position in a club you’re passionate about! If you want to start small, begin with a committee head and work your way up to the exec board. You’ll be glad you did 🙂

Jenna

Debunking Myths of Student Leadership

Hey everyone!  Ryan here.  So, it is that time of year when it seems like all of the applications for student leadership positions and opportunities are out there (my email inbox is full of them and I’m not even a student here!).

In fact, here in FYE, we are currently searching for students to be Orientation Leaders, First-Year Connections Team members, First-Year Leadership Collaborative facilitators and interns, Camp Buckeye facilitators, Buckeye Adventures facilitators, Buckeyes Beyond Ohio Activities Board members, and Transfer Student Activities Board members.  So yes, we are looking for a few students to get involved.  Part of my job is to recruit, interview, and select students to serve in many of these positions.  I have been selecting student leaders for six years now and applied, interviewed, and was selected (and yes, often not selected) for several leadership positions myself when I was a college student.

As a first-year student, you may be wondering what “type” of student we are seeking to fill these positions.  I often hear students (especially during their first year) say, “I’d love to be an (insert student leadership position here), but I’m not what they are looking for.”  Well, I am here today to debunk some of the myths and let you know what we are really looking for.

Myth: You have to have all of the experience to be selected for anything.

If you have to already possess all the experience to become involved, then how does anyone become involved in the first place?  The truth is that many student leaders get involved simply because they are willing to put themselves out there and take a chance.

Myth: First-year students haven’t been here long enough to get involved.

If a position is not open for first-year students, then the application will say so.  In FYE, we particularly think that first-year students should be represented in our positions.  Think about it.  Who better to help first-year students than those who just lived that experience (and lived to tell the tale)?  In fact, the First-Year Connections Team only accepts current first-year student applications for that very reason!

Myth: Only overly excited people are chosen for leadership positions.

The thought of facilitating an icebreaker isn’t what gets you out of bed every morning, so clearly leadership positions are not in the cards for you, right?  I hope that logic seems as silly to you as it was for me to write it.  I get it.  I’m not always the super excited type myself (I can be when needed, often with the assistance of my best friend coffee).  What we really want are people who can relate to our new first-year students.  While it is certainly awesome to be excited about connecting with others, real people aren’t ALWAYS excited about EVERYTHING.  We want students who can relate to other students, and sometimes that even includes relating to feelings of nervousness, anxiousness, and frustration.

Myth: You have to be in a certain group/clique/circle/crowd/tribe to get selected for any type of leadership position.

Please.  That is SO high school.

So what are we looking for?  It’s actually pretty simple.  The most important qualities that are shared by all of our students are:

1)      A passion for helping first-year students be successful at Ohio State, and

2)      A desire to develop your leadership skills.

Of course, there’s more to it than that.  However, if those two statements apply to you, then you should look at our various positions and consider applying for any which interest you!  Still not sure about whether you would be a great student leader?  Watch the video below, repeat after Jessica, and apply!

To learn more about the various leadership positions, applications, and application deadlines, leave a comment for us, visit the website links in this post, or email askfye@osu.edu!