Call for Submissions: The Journal of Short Film Volume 24

The Journal of Short Film(JSF) is a quarterly DVD publication of peer-reviewed short films of all genres. It is published by The Ohio State University Film Studies Program. The journal is modeled on the literary journal, complete with an editorial board made up of filmmakers and scholars.
Specifics attributes of The Journal of Short are;
• a quarterly DVD journal containing 90-120 minutes of independent short film per volume
• peer-reviewed by filmmakers and scholars of film theory
• inclusive of all genres of film, favoring independent and underrepresented work
• open and free submission process
• filmmakers maintain all rights to their work
• sold at a low cost—$10/vol., $36/subscription
• distributed to schools and libraries around the world
• non-corporate and ad-free

Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 24 are due Friday June 10th.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The submission must contain your:
film, name, postal address, email address, and telephone number
Include an addressed, stamped envelope if you’d like it returned.
All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please do not submit films via email.
Please submit films in the following format:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please no PAL tapes or discs.
Rights, and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.
Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

JSF Vol 23 CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Journal of Short Film is a not for profit peer reviewed publication that is devoted to the distribution of the underrepresented medium of short film. To date the Journal of Short Film has published and distributed 199 films from over 200 filmmakers from its completely free submissions process.

This is the Journal of Short Film:
• a quarterly DVD journal containing 90-120 minutes of independent short film per volume
• peer-reviewed by filmmakers and scholars of film theory
• inclusive of all genres of film, favoring independent and underrepresented work
• sold at a low cost—$10/vol., $36/subscription
• non-corporate and ad-free
• open and free submission process

Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 23 are due Friday, April 1st.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:
The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Submission must contain your:
Film
Name
Postal Address
Email address
Telephone Number

If you need your work returned, please include an addressed postage paid envelope.
All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please, do not submit films via email.

Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please, no PAL tapes or discs.
Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.

Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

Thank you for submitting your work to the Journal of Short Film!

Mailing Address for Entries :

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Journal Of Short Film Releases Volume 20


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The Journal of Short Film is pleased to announce the immediate release of Volume 20 on DVD. The Journal of Short Film is a not for profit peer reviewed publication that is devoted to the distribution of the underrepresented medium of short film. To date the Journal of Short Film has published and distributed 199 films from over 200 filmmakers from its completely free submissions process.

In is most technically diverse publication yet, the Journal of Short Film presents nine short works exploring themes utilizing unique methods specific to the cinematic experience. Several of the works reveal the film making process while others carefully conceal it. Meditate on each work’s visceral theme as it is continued in variations through out this volume.

The Journal of Short Film Volume 20 Contents:

1. Themes & Variations for the Naked Eye – Caitlin Horsmon (2007; 11:01)
A curious character evokes sensuality through touch, taking the audience through visceral excavations of a series of bodies.

2. >>Re-considering The new Industrial Parks near Irvine, California by Lewis Baltz, 1974 << – Mario Pfeifer (2009; 12:56)
The film revisits one of the industrial structures Lewis Baltz documented in his historic “New Topographics” with an eleven minute tracking shot on split screen.

3. Pancakes for Dad – Stacie Sells (2009; 3:31)
An “Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter! We make cakes and nothing is the matter!” Maurice Sendak

4. Two Men – Ian Olds (2005; 16:20)
A nameless protagonist, with a gun in his hand and a stranger in his car, sets out to prove to himself and his friends that he is not a coward.

5. The Sinking Ship – Shawn Downey & Brian Hearn (2002; 7:00)
Based on a story by Robert Louis Stevenson, this period animation tells the tale of a nutty ship’s captain who ignores the warnings from his crew that the vessel is in distress, igniting a philosophical rant.

6. photo-synthesis – Lisa Danker (2005; 3:40)
Shot on Kodachrome and 7363 high-contrast positive film, the footage was distressed with bleach and other materials, which resulted in nuanced colors and patterns that were then optically step-printed.

7. Fledgling – Tony Gault & Elizabeth Henry (2009; 7:15)
A short documentary that explores notions of domestication, both in humans and wild animals.

8. Chemical – Sean McHenry (2009; 9:26)
A semi-silent film on standard 16mm film using a Krasnogorsk K-3 and a Bolex H-16 camera. A jilted woman with a misplaced trust and a story to tell that will never be told.

9. Aftermath on Meadowlark Lane – Zellner Bros. (2007; 10:00)

While on their way to a mariachi recital, a devastating car crash forces a mother and her two sons to confront the truth about their past.

Volume 20 and subscription purchasing:

By Mail:

Pricing Information

The Journal of Short Film

Film Studies Program

Smith Laboratory Rm 4108

174 W 18th Ave

Columbus, Oh 43210 USA

By Phone: 614-292-6044

Volume 20:

Individual: $10, Institution: $18

Yearly Subscription:

Individual: $36, Institution: 72

Online: www.TheJSF.org

Call for Submissions for Volume 22

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Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 22 are due Friday, November 5th.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Submission must contain your:
Film
Name
Postal Address
Email address
Telephone Number

If you need your work returned, please include an addressed postage paid envelope.

All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please, do not submit films via email.

Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please, no PAL tapes or discs.

Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.

Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

Thank you for submitting your work to the Journal of Short Film!

The JSF Celebrates International Films


Since its premier in the Fall of 2005, The Journal of Short Film has distributed nearly 200 works from artists and collectives from all over the world. As part of its mission to distribute under represented works, the journal reaches far and wide for submissions. Many of the artists selected are from outside of the United States. The works selected demonstrate that cinema speaks its own language. Subtitles are not necessary for moments of play between two brothers in Carolina Hellsgard’s Hunger (Vol. 19). Words would be superfluous to the stomach clenching tension of the escape in Nash Edgerton’s Lucky (Vol. 6). An interpreter is unnecessary to absorb the beauty of wordless animations of Rob Tyler’s color+modulation (Vol. 18), Lemeh42’s Inner Klånge (Vol. 19), and Scott Kravitz’s Loom (Vol. 16). These moments in cinema unite us under the grand universal experiences of human life. Sharing intimate relationships with our friends and family, living in moments that are turbulent and trying, and inevitably reaching the end of this life are relational across cultural boundaries and the limitations of language. We are all attracted to the every day beautiful images we see, sounds we experience, and textures of our environment that color our interpretation of everything.

This is the power of cinema, to take these experiences and punctuate them within one beautiful moment between two characters who smile, to present two abstract colors in motion that excite, intrigue and elicit strong emotions. Cinema has the ability to capture us without lingering consideration as to what it is communicating to us. Whether from Israel or Germany, India or the United States, the universal language of cinema speaks to all of us.

Support short film makers by subscribing to the Journal of Short Film.


N.D. Eggert
Communications Intern
photo credit: Hunger (2009), Carolina Hellsgard, Journal of Short Film Volume 19

A peek at Volume 19: Michael Fisher’s Widow

The Journal of Short Film’s Volume 19 offers challenging insight into language and deception as the filmmakers present hypnotists and tricksters, tactillic interpretation and pantomimic representation of our world. Of the films that offer a narration, the words attempt to describe the abstract notions of God and metaphor, showing how easily language fails to communicate what is around us. Each film offers a photographic rather than cinematic style which creates a lingering effect over the details of each image.

Michael Fisher’s Widow appears as a series of black and white photographs endowed with life to tell the story of an ending love affair between two Puritans. The suitor’s hands linger on the ripped bark of trees, the widows eye stare widely as he approaches her door. The camera pauses on each face, each hand and footstep, as if to ponder the choices the lovers must make. Words are not exchanged as the suitor leaves the widow, the threshold is not breached. Not to bear a moment more of his absence, the widow considers a poisonous vile on her mantle. His regret and hesitation is apparent as he slowly walks away, then turns to look at the house over his shoulder. As the suitor steps back to the house, the widow’s long hair slowly folds upon the bare wooden floor. His skin pulls tightly around his knuckle as he braces to knock her door communicating his presence…

Please, follow this link to see Widow by Michael Fisher in its original 16:9 format.

The Journal of Short Film Releases Volume 19





The Journal of Short Film is pleased to announce the upcoming release of volume 19 on July 23rd, 2010. Peer reviewed and to date publishing over 180 filmmakers from all over the globe, this volume explores the intimate relationship between abstract thought and the development of language. From still life to Chopin, each work contains meticulous visual and audio compositions. Roland Barthes argued that photography is a language, so we invite you to allow this collection of photographic short films to speak to you. But, as the proverb says, do not believe everything you hear. Prepare to be challenged visually and conceptually with deception lurking within the languages of sight and sound.



The Journal of Short Film Volume 19 Contents:

1. Infiltration – Charles Chadwick (2009, 4:53)

The film Infiltration is designed to induce a hypnotic state within which a lone figure is carried through deathly sites.

2. Hunger – Carolina Hellsgård (2009, 17:40)

The siblings Roland and Paul watch the deportation of their immigrant neighbors; afterwards they decide to enter the abandoned apartment.

3. Abstract? – Alexei Dmitriev (2009, 3:30)

An unhurried film dealing with the notion of the abstract.

4. Widow – Michael Fisher (2010, 5:30)

A Puritan suitor retreats from a courtship, unaware of his effect on the widow’s bleak state.

5. Canyon Time – Richard O’Sullivan (2004, 15:35)

Canyon Time creates a contrast between the slow-turning time of the natural world and the fleetingness of the human moment.

6. Inner Klänge – Lemeh42 (2010, 10:00)

Inner Klänge is a personal homage made by Lemeh42 to Kandinsky’s homonymous work.

7. Kyrie – Michael A. Morris (2009, 14:30)

A consideration of heavenly bodies and learning by rote.

8. The Commoners – Jessica Bardsley and Penny Lane (2009, 12:30)

An essay film about Eugene Schieffelin’s introduction of European Starlings to America in 1890, and what it means today.

9. Coyote – Robert Harris (1997, 17:07)

Coyote is an invocation of the many shady, shifting forms of Coyote — wild dog, trickster, and smuggler — told in a style that mimics his multifarious shape.

Volume 19 and subscription purchasing:

By Mail:

Pricing Information:

The Journal of Short Film

Film Studies Program,

Smith Laboratory Rm4108

174 W. 18th Ave

Columbus, Oh 43210 USA

By Phone: 614-292-6044

Volume 19:

Individual: $10, Institution: $18

Yearly Subscription:

Individual: $36, Institution: $72

Online: www.theJSF.org

A note on Volume 18


While I was preparing to write the press release for Volume 18, the most recent of the Journal of Short Film’s publications, I watched the collection of works in sequence again and again. Each time the films revealed to me an even greater incite into its theme of communicating across space and time, and those areas of misinterpretation we all encounter in life. Each viewing I would return to the same piece, Rob Tylor’s Color + Modulation 1. The film is the first in a collection of eight films on 16mm. Rather than shooting with the film, Tylor hand painted each frame with a spinning wheel of vivid colors and light, and provided a meditative soundtrack accompaniment. The piece is absent of dialog and human presence, although the artist’s imprint is clearly visible as each frame is slightly different than the next. The effect is mesmerizing. The slight hissing and popping with the circular movements of the brushstrokes liken to a glowing vinyl, with colors so meticulously chosen they create retina burning compositions. The colors lift off of the screen in a neon electric glow and into the world outside of the monitor or screen.

I have always personally struggled with interpreting the abstract. As most humans, I seek that which fits into neatly categorized packages, seeking order in this life full of chaos. In this way Color + Modulation 1 challenges me with the questions posed by the encapsulating work of Volume 18, I Cannot Understand You by David Baeumler. How do we understand each other over so many differences? Can we learn to discover and accept those things that bind us as humans? Can we understand without using arbitrary names and calculation, but simply appreciate our language of expression without using a translator, accept the images of our world without a guide? We are all moved by and survive through the color and light of our experience.

The Journal of Short Film Releases Volume 18


The Journal of Short Film is pleased to announce the immediate release of volume 18. Peer reviewed and to date publishing over 180 filmmakers, this a collection of shorts films which explore how humans communicate across space and time. Through highly stylized techniques, the camera observes children and soldiers in the landscapes of Iraq, poetic compositions of nature in 19th century Manhattan, and an impressionistic stop motion animated look at a county fair, just to name a few destinations in this painterly collection of works.

The Journal of Short Film Volume 18 Contents:

Color + Modulation 1 – Rob Tyler (2008, 5:14) Hand painted and digitally manipulated 16mm film provides simple and clean compositions inspired by industrial design and graphic arts.

Sebastian – Ann Steuernagel (2007, 6:00) Sebastian, derived from found documentary footage, is a meditation on beauty, destruction and the unconscious.

Cateract – Sainath Choudhury (2005, 9:00) In part buddhist koan, in part urban love story, the film poses the question of unconditional love, and suggests that there may be an answer.

Winning the Peace – Eli Kaufman (2004, 18:00) An Iraqi-American Marine returns to Iraq to redeem his place of birth, only to destroy the people he hoped to save.

Tidal Wave – Salise Hughes (2005, 1:36) One man’s nightmares take physical shape in a rising tide that seems to be taking the form of each figure in the crowd.

Somewhere Never Traveled – Ben Garchar (2009, 5:30) Only one love, only one take, and then what?

Five County Fair – David Ellsworth (2008, 16:00) An impressionistic super-8 look at Farmville, Virginia’s annual Five County Fair.

The Commoners – Jessica Bardsley and Penny Lane (2009, 12:30) An essay film about Eugene Schieffelin’s introduction of European Starlings to America in 1890, and what it means today.

I Cannot Understand You – David Baeumler (2004, 5:44) Don’t fear life’s misunderstandings – let a philosophical tape recorder guide you through a world of fireworks, flowers and thrill rides.

Volume 18 and subscription purchasing:

Online: www.theJSF.org

By Mail:
The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program,
Smith Laboratory Rm4108

174 W. 18th Ave Columbus, Oh 43210 USA

By Phone: 614-292-6044

Volume 18:
Individual: $10,
Institution: $18

Yearly Subscription:
Individual: $36, Institution: $72

Call for submissions for Volume 20

Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 20 are due Friday, April 30th.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Submission must contain your:
Film, name, postal address, email address and telephone number.
Include an addressed, stamped envelope if you’d like it returned.
All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the
deadline to respond. Please do not submit films via email.

Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please no PAL tapes or discs.

Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted
to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.
Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested
later.

Thank you for submitting your work to the Journal of Short Film!