The Journal of Short Film Volume 36 – Press Release

From animation to live action, narrative to augmented-reality essay, The Journal of Short Film, Volume 36 brings together films produced in an array of styles and modes. In spite of their diversity, all of these films deal with the connections that, for better and for worse, define human beings’ experiences of the world: connections with other people, with nature, and with higher powers. The films are interested in visualizing how these formative connections emerge and how they break down. They explore the simultaneously creative and destructive aspects of relationships, at a time when our relationship with the screen—liberated from the theater and the living room and appearing in our palms, cars, and glasses—seems increasingly primary.

Still from Bye-Bye Blackbird by Gaia Bonsignore

Still from Bye-Bye Blackbird by Gaia Bonsignore

Still from Big Willow by Jared Katsiane

Still from Big Willow by Jared Katsiane

Still from Jump by Franz Ross and Dara Eliacin

Still from Jump by Franz Ross and Dara Eliacin

The Journal of Short Film, Volume 36

  1. Bye-Bye Blackbird, Gaia Bonsignore (2013). A conversational but visually complex live-action short, Bye-Bye Blackbird transports the viewer from a bedroom, to a deserted country road, to the beach, and back. Repeatedly reframing reality as artifice, the film reflects on the power of travel, imagination, and storytelling. (15:30)
  1. Animation Hotline, Dustin Grella (2013). Animation Hotline is a series of animated micro-shorts based on anonymous messages left on the artist’s voicemail. Kinetic, chalkboard-style drawings illustrate and provide ironic counterpoint to the words of the eclectic speakers’ sometimes insightful, sometimes bizarre anecdotes. (5:24)
  1. Three-O-Seven, Spencer Howson and Cole Becker (2014). A detective investigating a puzzling murder quickly finds himself locked in a dangerous game with a smart, calculating killer. In its setting and visual style, Three-O-Seven situates itself squarely in the tradition of film noir, even as its frenetic handheld camerawork suggests the influence of more contemporary procedurals. (8:53)
  1. The Umbrella Factory, Nick and Lexie Trivundza (2013). Spare animations harkening back to the Victorian Era bring a narrator’s macabre tale to life in The Umbrella Factory. One rainy evening, a traveler knocks on the door of three brothers’ house, offering them a wish-granting talisman in exchange for room and board. The brothers attempt to exploit the talisman’s powers, failing to heed the old adage, Be careful what you wish for. (3:52)
  1. Jump, Franz Ross and Dara Eliacin (2014). Jump is a silent film with musical accompaniment, which relies on point-of-view editing and actor movement for its effects. In this tragicomic vignette, the paraphernalia of a playground frustrates and eventually enables two young children’s effort to play together. (2:19)
  1. Street Views, Annie Berman (2013). Set in New York City’s West Village, but “shot” almost entirely within Google’s Street View, this subtle essay film explores how virtual mapping alters our experience of space and identity. Street Views is a somnambulist tour, which defies natural laws of perspective, time, and continuity, allowing one to get lost without ever straying from the map. (8:10) www.annieberman.net, info@fishinhand.com
  1. Big Willow, Jared Katsiane (2013). Blurring the line between dramatic narrative and observational documentary, Willow offers an elliptical narrative about an aspiring artist facing the impending destruction of his favorite subject, “Big Willow.” Through the juxtaposition of the artist’s younger sister’s voiceover and often impressionistic images, the film makes the eponymous tree a potent symbol of hope and frustration. (10:29) www.jaredkatsiane.com
  1. Teddy, Margaret Orr (2014). In this animated short, a stuffed toy acts heroically to protect a sleeping child from the monster lurking under the bed. With its unusual blend of the cute and the violent, Teddy offers intriguing echoes of Edwin Porter’s groundbreaking novelty film, The “Teddy” Bears (Edison, 1907), which introduced the iconic toy to the American screen. (1:47)
  1. A Well-Proved Helpmate, Richard Bailey (2013). Speaking directly into the camera, folk preacher Pontain Mitchell attempts to explain his beliefs and ministerial practices. As decontextualized images punctuate his discourse, A Well-Proved Helpmate becomes a meditation on the limitations of linguistic sense and the evocative powers of the word. (14:35)

The Journal of Short Film Staff is: Publisher – Ohio State University Film Studies Program Executive Editor – Ryan Jay Friedman Editors – Brian Hauser, Margaret C. Flinn Production Manager – Matt Swift Production Assistant – Michael Polk, Nikki Swift

Purchase JSF 36 Today!

Journal of Short Film at the Society for Cinema Media Studies 2015 Annual Conference

Every year the Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS) host an annual conference. During that conference there are over 1500 scholars in the field of film and media studies who participate in panels, workshops, working groups, and more. This year the conference is in Montreal, Canada.
The Journal of Short has been participating in SCMS for the past 5 years by attending and setting up a booth in the exhibition space.
This year we will have a booth to hand out free copies of the JSF to help highlight it’s value as a pedagogical tool. Each volume will contain a link to a recent Teaching Media dossier featuring essays about online teaching and specifically an essay, Using Short Films and Regular Viewing Habits as a Catalyst for Online Pedagogy, that mentions how the JSF is used for online teaching at The Ohio State University.
We are in the process of packing up materials for the exhibition and will be posting more updates on our facebook page as the conference proceeds from March 25th to March 29th.

JSF 33 32 and 22JSF boxset 1JSF boxset 2

Call for Submissions Volume 27

Call for Submissions for Volume 27
Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 27 are due Friday, April 27th.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:
The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Hagerty Hall, Room 150
1775 College Road
Columbus, OH 43210, USA
The Submission must contain your:
Film
Name
Postal Address
Email address
Telephone Number
If you need your work returned, please include an addressed postage paid envelope.
All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please, do not submit films via email.
Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please, no PAL tapes or discs.
Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.
Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.
For more information on how you can be published with the Journal of Short Film and receive international distribution of your work, please visit our website at www.thejsf.org or send us an email at theJSF@osu.edu.
Thank you.

Call for Submissions: The Journal of Short Film Volume 24

The Journal of Short Film(JSF) is a quarterly DVD publication of peer-reviewed short films of all genres. It is published by The Ohio State University Film Studies Program. The journal is modeled on the literary journal, complete with an editorial board made up of filmmakers and scholars.
Specifics attributes of The Journal of Short are;
• a quarterly DVD journal containing 90-120 minutes of independent short film per volume
• peer-reviewed by filmmakers and scholars of film theory
• inclusive of all genres of film, favoring independent and underrepresented work
• open and free submission process
• filmmakers maintain all rights to their work
• sold at a low cost—$10/vol., $36/subscription
• distributed to schools and libraries around the world
• non-corporate and ad-free

Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 24 are due Friday June 10th.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The submission must contain your:
film, name, postal address, email address, and telephone number
Include an addressed, stamped envelope if you’d like it returned.
All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please do not submit films via email.
Please submit films in the following format:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please no PAL tapes or discs.
Rights, and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.
Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

JSF Vol 23 CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Journal of Short Film is a not for profit peer reviewed publication that is devoted to the distribution of the underrepresented medium of short film. To date the Journal of Short Film has published and distributed 199 films from over 200 filmmakers from its completely free submissions process.

This is the Journal of Short Film:
• a quarterly DVD journal containing 90-120 minutes of independent short film per volume
• peer-reviewed by filmmakers and scholars of film theory
• inclusive of all genres of film, favoring independent and underrepresented work
• sold at a low cost—$10/vol., $36/subscription
• non-corporate and ad-free
• open and free submission process

Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 23 are due Friday, April 1st.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:
The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Submission must contain your:
Film
Name
Postal Address
Email address
Telephone Number

If you need your work returned, please include an addressed postage paid envelope.
All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please, do not submit films via email.

Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please, no PAL tapes or discs.
Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.

Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

Thank you for submitting your work to the Journal of Short Film!

Mailing Address for Entries :

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Journal Of Short Film Releases Volume 20


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The Journal of Short Film is pleased to announce the immediate release of Volume 20 on DVD. The Journal of Short Film is a not for profit peer reviewed publication that is devoted to the distribution of the underrepresented medium of short film. To date the Journal of Short Film has published and distributed 199 films from over 200 filmmakers from its completely free submissions process.

In is most technically diverse publication yet, the Journal of Short Film presents nine short works exploring themes utilizing unique methods specific to the cinematic experience. Several of the works reveal the film making process while others carefully conceal it. Meditate on each work’s visceral theme as it is continued in variations through out this volume.

The Journal of Short Film Volume 20 Contents:

1. Themes & Variations for the Naked Eye – Caitlin Horsmon (2007; 11:01)
A curious character evokes sensuality through touch, taking the audience through visceral excavations of a series of bodies.

2. >>Re-considering The new Industrial Parks near Irvine, California by Lewis Baltz, 1974 << – Mario Pfeifer (2009; 12:56)
The film revisits one of the industrial structures Lewis Baltz documented in his historic “New Topographics” with an eleven minute tracking shot on split screen.

3. Pancakes for Dad – Stacie Sells (2009; 3:31)
An “Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter! We make cakes and nothing is the matter!” Maurice Sendak

4. Two Men – Ian Olds (2005; 16:20)
A nameless protagonist, with a gun in his hand and a stranger in his car, sets out to prove to himself and his friends that he is not a coward.

5. The Sinking Ship – Shawn Downey & Brian Hearn (2002; 7:00)
Based on a story by Robert Louis Stevenson, this period animation tells the tale of a nutty ship’s captain who ignores the warnings from his crew that the vessel is in distress, igniting a philosophical rant.

6. photo-synthesis – Lisa Danker (2005; 3:40)
Shot on Kodachrome and 7363 high-contrast positive film, the footage was distressed with bleach and other materials, which resulted in nuanced colors and patterns that were then optically step-printed.

7. Fledgling – Tony Gault & Elizabeth Henry (2009; 7:15)
A short documentary that explores notions of domestication, both in humans and wild animals.

8. Chemical – Sean McHenry (2009; 9:26)
A semi-silent film on standard 16mm film using a Krasnogorsk K-3 and a Bolex H-16 camera. A jilted woman with a misplaced trust and a story to tell that will never be told.

9. Aftermath on Meadowlark Lane – Zellner Bros. (2007; 10:00)

While on their way to a mariachi recital, a devastating car crash forces a mother and her two sons to confront the truth about their past.

Volume 20 and subscription purchasing:

By Mail:

Pricing Information

The Journal of Short Film

Film Studies Program

Smith Laboratory Rm 4108

174 W 18th Ave

Columbus, Oh 43210 USA

By Phone: 614-292-6044

Volume 20:

Individual: $10, Institution: $18

Yearly Subscription:

Individual: $36, Institution: 72

Online: www.TheJSF.org

Call for Submissions for Volume 22

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Deadline:
Submissions for Volume 22 are due Friday, November 5th.
Submit films of less than 20 minutes to:

The Journal of Short Film
Film Studies Program
Smith Laboratory, Rm 4108
174 W. 18th Avenue
Columbus, OH 43210, USA

The Submission must contain your:
Film
Name
Postal Address
Email address
Telephone Number

If you need your work returned, please include an addressed postage paid envelope.

All submissions are carefully considered. It may take up to 2 months after the deadline to respond. Please, do not submit films via email.

Acceptable submission formats:
DVDs are preferred, though VHS tapes will be accepted on a need basis.
DVDs must be Region 1, NTSC. Please, no PAL tapes or discs.

Rights and Clearances
The filmmaker maintains the rights to the film. The publishing right granted to the JSF is a non-exclusive, one-time serial right.

Films must have ALL clearances available in writing. Copies may be requested later.

Thank you for submitting your work to the Journal of Short Film!

The JSF Celebrates International Films


Since its premier in the Fall of 2005, The Journal of Short Film has distributed nearly 200 works from artists and collectives from all over the world. As part of its mission to distribute under represented works, the journal reaches far and wide for submissions. Many of the artists selected are from outside of the United States. The works selected demonstrate that cinema speaks its own language. Subtitles are not necessary for moments of play between two brothers in Carolina Hellsgard’s Hunger (Vol. 19). Words would be superfluous to the stomach clenching tension of the escape in Nash Edgerton’s Lucky (Vol. 6). An interpreter is unnecessary to absorb the beauty of wordless animations of Rob Tyler’s color+modulation (Vol. 18), Lemeh42’s Inner Klånge (Vol. 19), and Scott Kravitz’s Loom (Vol. 16). These moments in cinema unite us under the grand universal experiences of human life. Sharing intimate relationships with our friends and family, living in moments that are turbulent and trying, and inevitably reaching the end of this life are relational across cultural boundaries and the limitations of language. We are all attracted to the every day beautiful images we see, sounds we experience, and textures of our environment that color our interpretation of everything.

This is the power of cinema, to take these experiences and punctuate them within one beautiful moment between two characters who smile, to present two abstract colors in motion that excite, intrigue and elicit strong emotions. Cinema has the ability to capture us without lingering consideration as to what it is communicating to us. Whether from Israel or Germany, India or the United States, the universal language of cinema speaks to all of us.

Support short film makers by subscribing to the Journal of Short Film.


N.D. Eggert
Communications Intern
photo credit: Hunger (2009), Carolina Hellsgard, Journal of Short Film Volume 19

A peek at Volume 19: Michael Fisher’s Widow

The Journal of Short Film’s Volume 19 offers challenging insight into language and deception as the filmmakers present hypnotists and tricksters, tactillic interpretation and pantomimic representation of our world. Of the films that offer a narration, the words attempt to describe the abstract notions of God and metaphor, showing how easily language fails to communicate what is around us. Each film offers a photographic rather than cinematic style which creates a lingering effect over the details of each image.

Michael Fisher’s Widow appears as a series of black and white photographs endowed with life to tell the story of an ending love affair between two Puritans. The suitor’s hands linger on the ripped bark of trees, the widows eye stare widely as he approaches her door. The camera pauses on each face, each hand and footstep, as if to ponder the choices the lovers must make. Words are not exchanged as the suitor leaves the widow, the threshold is not breached. Not to bear a moment more of his absence, the widow considers a poisonous vile on her mantle. His regret and hesitation is apparent as he slowly walks away, then turns to look at the house over his shoulder. As the suitor steps back to the house, the widow’s long hair slowly folds upon the bare wooden floor. His skin pulls tightly around his knuckle as he braces to knock her door communicating his presence…

Please, follow this link to see Widow by Michael Fisher in its original 16:9 format.

The Journal of Short Film Releases Volume 19





The Journal of Short Film is pleased to announce the upcoming release of volume 19 on July 23rd, 2010. Peer reviewed and to date publishing over 180 filmmakers from all over the globe, this volume explores the intimate relationship between abstract thought and the development of language. From still life to Chopin, each work contains meticulous visual and audio compositions. Roland Barthes argued that photography is a language, so we invite you to allow this collection of photographic short films to speak to you. But, as the proverb says, do not believe everything you hear. Prepare to be challenged visually and conceptually with deception lurking within the languages of sight and sound.



The Journal of Short Film Volume 19 Contents:

1. Infiltration – Charles Chadwick (2009, 4:53)

The film Infiltration is designed to induce a hypnotic state within which a lone figure is carried through deathly sites.

2. Hunger – Carolina Hellsgård (2009, 17:40)

The siblings Roland and Paul watch the deportation of their immigrant neighbors; afterwards they decide to enter the abandoned apartment.

3. Abstract? – Alexei Dmitriev (2009, 3:30)

An unhurried film dealing with the notion of the abstract.

4. Widow – Michael Fisher (2010, 5:30)

A Puritan suitor retreats from a courtship, unaware of his effect on the widow’s bleak state.

5. Canyon Time – Richard O’Sullivan (2004, 15:35)

Canyon Time creates a contrast between the slow-turning time of the natural world and the fleetingness of the human moment.

6. Inner Klänge – Lemeh42 (2010, 10:00)

Inner Klänge is a personal homage made by Lemeh42 to Kandinsky’s homonymous work.

7. Kyrie – Michael A. Morris (2009, 14:30)

A consideration of heavenly bodies and learning by rote.

8. The Commoners – Jessica Bardsley and Penny Lane (2009, 12:30)

An essay film about Eugene Schieffelin’s introduction of European Starlings to America in 1890, and what it means today.

9. Coyote – Robert Harris (1997, 17:07)

Coyote is an invocation of the many shady, shifting forms of Coyote — wild dog, trickster, and smuggler — told in a style that mimics his multifarious shape.

Volume 19 and subscription purchasing:

By Mail:

Pricing Information:

The Journal of Short Film

Film Studies Program,

Smith Laboratory Rm4108

174 W. 18th Ave

Columbus, Oh 43210 USA

By Phone: 614-292-6044

Volume 19:

Individual: $10, Institution: $18

Yearly Subscription:

Individual: $36, Institution: $72

Online: www.theJSF.org