Genocide in Rwanda

I attended a presentation on Rwandan Genocide which was categorized as meeting the academic requirement for events. Obviously, genocide is a difficult topic to tackle because it’s emotionally and mentally intimidating, but what’s unexpectedly hard to face about the issue is how rarely genocide is caught in time to prevent mass casualties and pain. Through the lens of international affairs, it seems that a major issue for national and international governing bodies should be to confront major issues such as the unwarranted killing of peoples, but it remains terrifyingly avoidable. We discussed the categories that qualify an event as genocide and how that continues to expand and be more inclusive in order to try and protect a wider range of groups (i.e. LGBTQ+, those of certain genders) yet action is rarely taken against genocides until it is far too late. If there are so many guidelines, how is it that countries tiptoe around the term “genocide” to avoid outright international involvement? The issue is, of course, complicated by boundaries set between nations and their allies, but it greatly concerns me that international governing groups such as the UN have few to no accessible examples of how outside nations step in in these situations. International affairs are significant to me because it indicates that interaction occurs between nations occurring and often carries the connotation that these interactions are educational and used in beneficial ways. This activity served as a reminder of why one of the paths that I look towards as a way out of the undecided label is public service and government work. I want to be involved in some way to the world’s international affairs because major issues like the lack of pushback as genocides take place shouldn’t be something that takes forever to face. There are strategic stalemates than occur in government operations to prevent mass movements (i.e. length of senator terms in the U.S.) but stalemates should never spell out passivity towards human suffering, especially when the perpetrators are aware of the atrocities occurring.

Honeyland

On August 28th, I attended the screening of the documentary Honeyland. Honeyland is a documentary that details the life of Hatidze Muratova, a woman living secluded with her mother in the mountains of Macedonia. The film was shown as a part of the International Film Series being put on by the OSU Global Engagement Program and meets the social and academic requirements of an event. International Affairs requires that a person works in ways that interact with or effects people in many parts of the world. In order to successfully work with those of different background and cultures, it’s essential that a person works to develop understandings of the people that their work affects and on a personal level. Two major draws in terms of career prospects for me are film and public service. These are two very different fields but this film provided me with such confirmation as to the good that both fields can do in helping others. We often take for granted the movies that come flooding into theaters around the holidays that are often action-based, comedic, or romantic, but with filmmaking, a person can capture another person’s story as it occurs. Honeyland wasn’t a retelling of a woman’s life, but depicted her everyday activities, struggles, and traditions. I was completely unfamiliar with a life as this woman and many of the other people within the documentary led, and it was a heavy reminder as to how significantly parts of the world differ beyond climates and traditions. In filmmaking, there is such power in bringing others to know someone on a personal level in ways that they would never have the capability or even think to do. I believe that it’s fair to say that most people tend to categorize documentaries and nonfiction films as more boring genres of moving pictures, but when one is produced that captures the subject so that they appear as a holistically human person rather than an on-screen character, it excites me in thinking about the possibilities of film as well as drives me to learn about who else’s life story I’m missing out on.

G.O.A.L.S.

[ “G.O.A.L.S.” is a place where students write about how their planned, current, and future activities may fit into the Honors & Scholars G.O.A.L.S.: Global Awareness, Original Inquiry, Academic Enrichment, Leadership Development, and Service Engagement. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.

  • Global Awareness: Students cultivate and develop their appreciation for diversity and each individual’s unique differences. For example, consider course work, study abroad, involvement in cultural organizations or activities, etc.
  • Original Inquiry: Honors & Scholars students understand the research process by engaging in experiences ranging from in-class scholarly endeavors to creative inquiry projects to independent experiences with top researchers across campus and in the global community. For example, consider research, creative productions or performances, advanced course work, etc.
  • Academic Enrichment: Honors & Scholars students pursue academic excellence through rigorous curricular experiences beyond the university norm both in and out of the classroom.
  • Leadership Development: Honors & Scholars students develop leadership skills that can be demonstrated in the classroom, in the community, in their co-curricular activities, and in their future roles in society.
  • Service Engagement: Honors & Scholars students commit to service to the community.]

Career

[“Career” is where you can collect information about your experiences and skills that will apply to your future career.  Like your resume, this is information that will evolve over time and should be continually updated.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

Artifacts

[Artifacts are the items you consider to be representative of your academic interests and achievements. For each entry, include both an artifact and a detailed annotation.  An annotation includes both a description of the artifact and a reflection on why it is important to you, what you learned, and what it means for your next steps.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

About Me

Hello! My name is Molly Teller and I am a first-year at the Ohio State University. As of right now, I am undecided and a member of the International Affairs Scholars Program. Because OSU has such an expansive exploration program for undecided students, I’m working to make the most out of this year and figuring out what my interests are professionally and how my personal interests will grow. This ePortfolio will mainly focus on the events that I take part in to learn about both myself and the world around me.

I applied to the International Affairs group within the Scholars Program because something that’s significant to me is not only watching the world around me but being in touch with those events. My father is a history teacher and my mother is a professor of social work (with the Dr. prefix and everything as she so likes to remind people), so I’ve been raised on stories of strong women getting things done. I’d like to be one of those women. This year I’m fully embracing the sentiment that all things are connected, so I’m excited for what my experiences that I’ll be recording here will teach me, and that someday I may even be able to look back at this portfolio and trace how it is that I found my place.

Year in Review

[ “Year in Review”  is where you should reflect on the past year and show how you have evolved as a person and as a student.  You may want to focus on your growth in a particular area (as a leader, scholar, researcher, etc.) or you may want to talk about your overall experience over the past year.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]