Modeling Health Benefits and Harms of Public Policy Responses to the US Opioid Epidemic

This piece, aimed at estimating health outcomes of policies to mitigate the opioid epidemic, concludes based on its findings that “policies focused on services for addicted people improve population health without harming any groups.”

Sourced from Abstract in link.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137764/

Opioid Crisis: No Easy Fix to its Social and Economic Determinants

“Overreliance on opioid medications is emblematic of a health care system that incentivizes quick, simplistic answers to complex physical and mental health needs. In an analogous way, simplistic measures to cut access to opioids offer illusory solutions to this multidimensional societal challenge.”

Sourced from Abstract in Link.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5846593/

Today’s nonmedical opioid users are not yesterday’s patients; implications of data indicating stable rates of nonmedical use and pain reliever use disorder

“Health care in general, and pain and addiction management in particular, are nuanced undertakings. Current public policies aimed at reducing opioid-related deaths ignore such nuance in favor of ham-handed, empirically dubious, and demonstrably harmful dictates. Americans suffering from chronic pain, and those from whom they receive their treatment, deserve medical care managed through better-informed and more even-handed policy.”

Sourced from Abstract in link.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369835/

Whitewashed: The African American Opioid Epidemic

This piece aims to expose the ways in which we have focused our attention in regards to the opioid epidemic almost exclusively on white communities, leaving many African American communities who suffer in similar ways without the same care, attention, or exposure. Treatment and response plans should include African Americans as apart of the conversation, and this paper aims to support that claim with data and studies.

Link: https://chiul.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Whitewashed-AA-Opioid-Crisis-11-15-17_EMBARGOED_-FINAL.pdf

Toward Healthy Drug Policy in the United States – The Case of Safehouse

This work focuses on critiquing the past views on drug policy and calls on the Controlled Substance Act’s failure to control the supply of drugs and thereby reduce drug-related harms.

Sourced from the New England Journal of Medicine.

Link: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1913448

Substance Use and Recidivism Outcomes for Prison-Based Drug and Alcohol Interventions

This article evaluates data in recidivism, criminology, incarceration, and other areas of the criminal justice system to highlight the difficulties of conducting quality research in the prison setting and suggest innovative study design for future research on what best practices could be in order to ensure the best possible outcomes for inmates long-term.

Link: https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article/40/1/121/4992689

Points Blog Teaching Points

Points is a Joint Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society and the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy. Explore the history-focused blog’s posts related to teaching and education. Posts include webinars, syllabi, and other resources for those teaching the history of drugs and alcohol in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Link: https://pointshistory.com/category/features/teaching-points/

COVID-19 – Enacting a ‘new normal’ for people who use drugs

“This commentary presents a set of recommendations to UN agencies, governments, donor agencies, academics, researchers and civil society, challenging these actors to work alongside people who use drugs to enact a new reality based on solidarity and cooperation, protection of health, restoration of rights and dignity and most importantly to mobilize to win the peace.”

– Sourced from bio in link

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0955395920301730