Seminar: Drug Law Enforcement and the Bill of Rights

Abbreviated syllabus and reading list for Drug Law Enforcement and the Bill of Rights Seminar taught by Dr. Sarah Brady Siff at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. The seminar offers a constitutional legal history of drug control in the United States.

Link: https://u.osu.edu/teachingdrugs/files/2021/02/DrugLawEnforcementandtheBillofRights.pdf

Toward Healthy Drug Policy in the United States – The Case of Safehouse

This work focuses on critiquing the past views on drug policy and calls on the Controlled Substance Act’s failure to control the supply of drugs and thereby reduce drug-related harms.

Sourced from the New England Journal of Medicine.

Link: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1913448

Points Blog Teaching Points

Points is a Joint Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society and the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy. Explore the history-focused blog’s posts related to teaching and education. Posts include webinars, syllabi, and other resources for those teaching the history of drugs and alcohol in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Link: https://pointshistory.com/category/features/teaching-points/

Assessing the effects of medical marijuana laws on marijuana use: the devil is in the details

“This paper sheds light on previous inconsistencies identified in the literature regarding the relationship between medical marijuana laws (MMLs) and recreational marijuana use by closely examining the importance of policy dimensions (registration requirements, home cultivation, dispensaries) and the timing of when particular policy dimensions are enacted.”

– Sourced from bio in link

Link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25558490/

COVID-19 – Enacting a ‘new normal’ for people who use drugs

“This commentary presents a set of recommendations to UN agencies, governments, donor agencies, academics, researchers and civil society, challenging these actors to work alongside people who use drugs to enact a new reality based on solidarity and cooperation, protection of health, restoration of rights and dignity and most importantly to mobilize to win the peace.”

– Sourced from bio in link

Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0955395920301730

Flashback to the Federal Analog Act of 1986: Mixing Rules and Standards in the Cauldron

This resource details the differences in standards for illicit drugs and synthetic versions of those drugs dating back to the enactment of the Federal Analog Act of 1986. This act stated that if a synthetic drug has chemical structures close enough to the drug it means to imitate that it will also be outlawed. This law has been far-reaching in what and who it impacts, making it an Act worth revisiting more than 20 years later.

Link: https://www.law.upenn.edu/journals/lawreview/articles/volume156/issue4/Kau156U.Pa.L.Rev.1077(2008).pdf

Drug Use Series

Sourced from the Executive Summary in the link below:

“The drug use landscape is dynamic and changing. Changes in public attitudes and laws towards drug use have occurred in an increasing number of countries. Global drug production and consumption are increasing as are the risks and harms to health, while new substances continue to emerge. This Series focuses on opioids, cannabinoids, stimulants, and new psychoactive substances. The Series authors review the evidence on the epidemiology of drug use and related harms and interventions (treatment and policies) to address them. They highlight issues that are likely to become increasingly important in the next decade.”

Link: https://www.thelancet.com/series/drug-use

Is There a Remedy for the Irrelevance of Academic Criminal Law?

This article focuses on two gaps in the modern criminal law course: “the sevenfold growth in the incarcerated population that happened after 1972” and the “massive ‘War on Drugs’ that exploded in the United States between 1985 and 1995.”

Link: https://jle.aals.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1012&context=home