Ohio’s farm crisis: What farmers can do to deal with extreme weather

What can Ohio farmers do about the state’s recent record rainfall? How can they handle prevented planting and other issues caused by that rain? Going forward, how can they help their farms adapt to our wetter, warming world? Those and other questions will be answered at Climate Smart: Farming with Weather Extremes, a conference set for Thursday, July 18, in Plain City.

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Ohio’s farm crisis: What to do about prevented planting

An event offered twice on Wednesday, July 3, will help farmers decide what to do if rain has kept them from planting their crops. The issue is becoming a crisis: The past 12 months have been the wettest on record in Ohio, and due to the rain and muddy fields, many corn and soybean growers haven’t planted this year’s crops yet; they might not be able to plant them at all.

The event, called Managing Prevented Planting Acres, will share details on considerations including crop insurance, weed control, forage production, and cover crops. Experts from CFAES will serve as the featured speakers. The event is set for 9 a.m. to noon in Paulding and 2–5 p.m. in Bryan. The agenda is the same at both locations. Admission is free and open to the public.

Find further details. (Photo: Getty Images.)

How climate change is affecting the Great Lakes

In areas from rainfall to lake levels, fish to algal blooms, shipping to agriculture, drinking water quality to public health, “Climate change is causing significant and far-reaching impacts on the Great Lakes and the Great Lakes region.”

That’s according to the science-based Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change on the Great Lakesreleased last week by the nonprofit Environmental Law & Policy Center, based in Chicago, and the nonprofit Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

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Is more, heavier rain the new norm?

Weather extremes like those seen last year in Ohio, including more rainfall, heavier downpours, and warmer temperatures, will likely become the norm rather than the exception, says CFAES climate specialist Aaron Wilson. He says farmers in the state may need to make adjustments to deal with the extra water. Read the story.

On March 26, Wilson speaks on the topic in Shelby.