CFAES sustainability news, Nov. 9, 2020

Climate change greater threat to human life than nuclear holocaust, warn experts

Kashmir Images (India), Nov. 1; featuring Rattan Lal, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Researchers narrow down causes of Lake Erie algae blooms in 2020 review

WNWO-TV, Toledo, Oct. 28; featuring Chris Winslow, Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory)

‘One extreme after another’: Climate change forces region’s ag sector to adjust practices

Farm and Dairy, Oct. 22; featuring Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension

Let’s talk about climate change in Ohio

Come join virtual “Conversations on the Politics and Science of Climate Change in the Buckeye State.” It’s the next monthly program by CFAES’ Environmental Professionals Network, set for Tuesday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Participating is free of charge.

Check out the lineup of speakers and register. (Photo: Getty Images.)

CFAES reads for Sept. 24, 2020

Regenerative agriculture movement gains traction

Food Institute Blog, Sept. 18; Rattan Lal, School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR), cited

Western wildfires cause hazy skies, intense Ohio sunsets

Columbus Dispatch, Sept. 16; featuring Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension

Are coyotes moving into your neighborhood?

Science News for Students, Sept. 3; featuring Stan Gehrt, SENR

Boost your veggie crops’ climate resilience

Following up on their morning session on “climate-smart” organic grains, CFAES researchers Rafiq Islam and Alan Sundermeier will present “Climate-Smart Organic Vegetables: Healthy Soils, Healthy Food, and Healthy People” from 2–3:30 p.m. Feb. 14 at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) annual conference.

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Let’s talk about farming and climate change

Science shows that our climate is changing, and CFAES’s Aaron Wilson will talk about what that means to farming, and how farmers in Ohio can adapt to the changes, at the upcoming annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA).

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Ohio’s farm crisis: Why leaving a field unplanted can hurt it

Some 1.5 million acres of Ohio’s farm fields—an area twice the size of Rhode Island—didn’t have any corn, soybeans, or other cash crops planted on them this year. Reason: Record spring rain made the ground too wet to plant. Now those fields are at risk of problems from something called fallow syndrome, which is caused by the loss of crop-friendly microbes that live—or lived—in the fields’ soils.

Experts from CFAES explain. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Ohio’s farm crisis: Flooding-tolerant forages?

A talk set for next week’s Farm Science Review will feature alternative forage plants that tolerate flooding and drought.

Why it’s important: Ohio’s hay supply for livestock is currently extremely low due to spring’s excessive rainfall. Growing flooding-tolerant forages to feed livestock could limit the risk from such rain in the future. (Photo: Tall fescue, James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org.)

Ohio’s farm crisis: Crop diseases a threat

CFAES experts say late-planted corn and soybeans could be vulnerable to higher than normal crop disease levels this year. So farmers should stay on guard.

Record rain this spring forced many Ohio farmers to plant their crops late. A CFAES website offers help for farmers in dealing with the impacts of that rain. (Photo: Soybeans, Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

Ohio’s farm crisis: Disaster aid levels still uncertain

The disaster declaration for nearly half of Ohio’s 88 counties extends low-interest loans to farmers. But CFAES experts say many growers are hoping for changes that could offer more financial help.

Further details on Ohio’s rain-caused farm crisis can be found on CFAES’ frequently updated Addressing 2019 Agricultural Challenges website.