Watch: What people mean to water mean to fish

CFAES scientist Suzanne Gray explains her research connecting water quality, aquatic diversity and human activities in the video above. It’s her lightning-round talk (6:36) from CFAES’s Annual Research Conference. How do fish — from bluegills in the Scioto River, to walleyes in western Lake Erie, to cichlids in the Nile River basin — respond to rapid changes in their water caused by people?

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And also there were snapping turtles

“Simply moving across the slick, gloopy wetlands was difficult.”

So says an article about how Ohio Sea Grant- and CFAES-affiliated researchers are helping The Nature Conservancy to (1) improve water quality and (2) give homes to fish and wildlife by restoring a large marshland near Lake Erie. (Photo: iStock.)

A deep dive into water on Friday

CFAES’s 2018 Annual Research Conference, set for Friday, April 27, in Wooster, will feature 16 speakers on the theme “Meeting the Water Quality Challenge: Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Science to Improve Water Quality in Ohio.” Reporters, bloggers and the public are welcome to attend.

Find out more.

They’re seeing if toxins from Lake Erie algae get into food you might eat

Do toxins from Lake Erie algal blooms get into Lake Erie fish you might eat? What about vegetables that growers watered with water they pulled from the lake? Scientists with CFAES, funded by Ohio Sea Grant and the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, are helping find answers.

Watch: It ‘opened me up to the world of research’

What did Stone Lab’s Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Scholarship Program mean to CFAES student Madeline Lambrix, a participant in the program last summer? She talks about it in the video above. To donate to the endowment-funded program, scroll down to “Research and Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Funds” on the lab’s giving website.

FAQ on Lake Erie impairment designation

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency’s draft 2018 water quality report, released yesterday, includes a proposal to designate western Lake Erie as impaired for recreation (due to harmful algal blooms) and for drinking water (due to the microcystin toxin that is sometimes produced by those blooms). Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Lab programs today published an FAQ about the designation to help answer people’s questions.

Our big ocean mess is getting bigger

A CNN report today said the plastic-filled Great Pacific Garbage Patch is growing faster than expected and is “now three times the size of France.” France is about the same size as Texas, so picture three Texases’ worth of trash — or, closer to home, 75 Lake Eries’ worth — swirling in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

Here’s one of many reasons — economic benefits — to stop adding to that mess and clean it up.

Good for both farming, Lake Erie

“We’re trying to find solutions to move the health of Lake Erie in the right direction, but at the same time, keep the ag industry vibrant,” said Chris Winslow, director of Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Laboratory programs, quoted in a March 16 story in the Port Clinton News Herald. He was speaking at the Ottawa Soil and Water Conservation District’s annual Agricultural Community Breakfast on March 15, and was referring to the issue of agricultural phosphorus runoff, a cause of the harmful algal blooms plaguing Lake Erie and other water bodies. Scientists with Ohio Sea Grant, CFAES, and other agencies and institutions are working to find ways to reduce that runoff.