Danger: Borer-killed ash trees overhead

It’s bad enough that the emerald ash borer has killed millions of native ash trees. “Now,” CFAES entomologist Joe Boggs says, “you have standing (dead) trees that are starting to break apart”—and that can threaten home, life, and limb. Here’s what you should know and do. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Big trees on campus

Ohio State’s Columbus and Wooster campuses have each earned the Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree Campus USA recognition—and CFAES’ tree-mendous plant people helped.

“Trees on campus provide so many ecological benefits,” said Kathy Smith, forestry program director for CFAES, in a story published today on our CFAES Stories website. “They’re an integral part of a sustainable campus.”

Read the story.

Replacing your ash trees in spring?

Image of ash guidePlanning what you’d like to do in the coming year on your land? If the emerald ash borer has wiped out your ash trees, you can see your best choices for replacing them — whether in town or country — in a CFAES-published bulletin. And to boot, it’s now being offered at a sale price.

Urban green space expert at conference

Photo of High Line Park in New York 2Tom Smarr, horticulture director for The Parklands of Floyds Fork, a new urban park in Louisville, Kentucky, keynotes the Tri-State Green Industry Conference Feb. 4 in Cincinnati.

“(The conference) is for representatives of all sectors of the green industry,” said Julie Crook, horticulture program coordinator in OSU Extension’s Hamilton County office and chair of the event’s planning committee.

Smarr previously was horticulture director for New York City’s innovative High Line Park, shown here, which was built on an old elevated train track.

OSU Extension is CFAES’s outreach arm; CFAES is a conference co-sponsor. (Photo by Steven Severinghaus from Friends of the High Line licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.)