These students and crops are for change

Some Ohio State students are spending their summer helping fight hunger. Working at the 4-acre Ohio State Student Farm, located at CFAES’ Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory in Columbus, the students are growing more than 30 kinds of fruits and vegetables, are learning about and practicing urban farming, and are donating some of what they grow to local food security efforts.

Read more in a new CFAES Story called “Crops for change.”

Expert to speak on controlled environment ag

More and more farms could be under a roof. Meiny Prins, CEO and co-owner of the Dutch company Priva, presents “Do You Know the Green Belt? Sustainable Urban Agriculture in a Challenging World” from 10–11 a.m. Tuesday, May 21, on Ohio State’s campus in Columbus. The event is billed as an industry summit on controlled environment agriculture, a technology-driven way to produce food in greenhouses, buildings, grow rooms, and the like. Admission to the event is free, but attendees are asked to register in advance. There’s also a way to watch online. Find full details.

Continue reading

Friday: Community gardens, ‘Blackout’ concert

Ohio State’s 2019 Time for Change Week continues on Friday, April 5, with:

  • A presentation on community gardens, including how to run them and how they can improve a neighborhood’s food security, by members of the student group Nourish International, 11 a.m. to noon. Find out more.
  • Buckeye Blackout Concert, 6–9 p.m. “Lights out, get loud!” the event listing says. “Join us for a night of student and local bands, friends, and sustainable giveaways, all against the backdrop of Mirror Lake.”

Glean further details.

‘We grow food for the neighborhood’

“Urban agriculture and local food production are a growing phenomenon for several reasons, including to address food insecurity, as a means for an economic enterprise, for community building, and as job training for young people and others.”

That’s Mike Hogan, educator in the Franklin County office of OSU Extension, CFAES’ statewide outreach arm, quoted in a recent article by Tracy Turner, a writer with CFAES, on our CFAES Stories website. (Hogan recently received the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association’s 2019 Service Award.)

Called “Urban Agriculture in Ohio,” the article looks at how OSU Extension is helping farmers in Cleveland and Columbus.

“Our mission is simple,” one of the growers said in the article. “We grow food for the neighborhood.”

Check it out. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Testing urban farm soil, including for lead

You can learn how to get the lead out—a good thing for soil and people’s health—when Alyssa Zearley of CFAES’ School of Environment and Natural Resources presents “Testing Soils for Urban Agriculture” from 10:30 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Feb. 16, during the annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) in Dayton.

Continue reading

‘Beacon of hope’ raises fish and veggies

The Columbus Urban Farm Tour Series continues with a stop at Project AquaStar, an expanded aquaculture and vegetable farm, from 10:30 a.m. to noon Aug. 23.

Located at St. Stephen’s Community House in Columbus, the farm produces, among other things, herbs, vegetables and tilapia through aquaponics. By improving food security and health awareness, it’s “become a beacon of hope in the Linden community,” according to the house’s website.

Free admission. Find out more.

Homeless garden tour in Columbus

See the food and good growing in Columbus’s Friends of the Homeless Garden when the Columbus Urban Farm Tour Series hosts a visit called “Urban Community Garden Serving Homeless Men” from noon to 1:30 p.m. Aug. 19. Admission is free. Find further details. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Growing a ‘flourishing neighborhood resource’

On Saturday, July 14, Magic House Farm, which spans a half acre of formerly vacant lots in Columbus’s Franklinton neighborhood, will host the next stop in the Columbus Urban Farm Tour Series. You’re invited, the tour flier says, to see “how this urban oasis in a distressed neighborhood has grown from a small one-man operation to a flourishing and necessary neighborhood resource.” Free admission. Read more. See the series schedule.