Big trees on campus

Ohio State’s Columbus and Wooster campuses have each earned the Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree Campus USA recognition—and CFAES’ tree-mendous plant people helped.

“Trees on campus provide so many ecological benefits,” said Kathy Smith, forestry program director for CFAES, in a story published today on our CFAES Stories website. “They’re an integral part of a sustainable campus.”

Read the story.

Spotlight on woods, water, wildlife

The annual Ohio Woodland, Water, and Wildlife Conference is for you if you work in natural resources, manage land, or both. The agenda features 15 expert-led sessions grouped in three tracks—woodlands, water, and wildlife—and is set for March 6 in Mansfield. Topics in the tracks range from managing tree galls to using drones, mitigating algal blooms to managing geese, conserving birds to helping bumble bees. Check out the full list of topics and speakers.

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Good timing, what with spring on its way

Learn about managing your woods, along with the legalities of it, in Your Woodland Management Options and Legal Responsibilities, an upcoming workshop offered by CFAES’ Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. It’s from 6–8:30 p.m. Feb. 28 in Bucyrus.

The goal, the workshop’s website says, is “to help woodland owners become better managers of this important asset.”

Speaking will be Kathy Smith, forestry program director in CFAES’ School of Environment and Natural Resources, and Evin Bachelor, J.D., law fellow with the Farm Office of OSU Extension, CFAES’ statewide outreach arm.

Registration is $15 and is due by Feb. 25. Learn more and register online. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Learn to ID trees so you can care for them better

Knowing how to correctly identify trees is a key part of diagnosing any problems you might with them, such as pests or diseases.

So says the flier for Nature vs. Nurture Tree ID, an upcoming workshop taught by CFAES’s Ohio Woodland Stewards Program. It’s set for Wednesday, Oct. 3 in CFAES’s Secrest Arboretum in Wooster, and you need to register by Wednesday, Sept. 26. Registration is $35 and includes lunch and materials. There will be indoor and outdoor sessions, so dress for the weather.

Find details and register online. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Ohio chainsaw non-massacre

Millions of ash trees are dead in Ohio, victims of the emerald ash borer pest. Which means millions of chances exist for Ohioans to cut the trees down using chainsaws. Fortunately, demonstrations in the Gwynne Conservation Area at CFAES’s upcoming Farm Science Review, sawdust flying, will show how to do it safely and right. “Chainsaw Maintenance: Sharpening and Safety,” 11 a.m. to noon on all three days of the Review, Tuesday, Sept. 18, Wednesday, Sept. 19, and Thursday, Sept. 20. “Chainsaw Cutting Techniques,” 12:30-1:30 p.m., also all three days. See the full Gwynne schedule.