Our growing history with biosolids

That small corn patch you see in this photo, which is growing—indeed, thriving—in the middle of Ohio State’s Columbus campus, is part of a wider, sustainability-related project meant to show how biosolids—processed human waste from sewage—can be (and historically have been) used to help grow food. Get the full poop in our latest CFAES Story.

See 4 unique ways NE Ohio is composting

This year’s Composting in Ohio tour, set for Aug. 22 and co-sponsored by CFAES’ Ohio Composting and Manure Management Program (OCAMM), will feature four unique large-scale composting facilities located in Cleveland and Akron.

Tour-goers, organizers say, will get a close look at the sites’ operations and a chance to learn from experts.

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An eco-friendly replacement for plastic?

From an Ohio State story yesterday about a study done by scientists from CFAES:

“New research … has shown that combining natural rubber with bioplastic in a novel way results in a much stronger replacement for plastic, one that is already capturing the interest of companies looking to shrink their environmental footprints.”

Read the story.

Compost operator course coming soon

CFAES’ 2019 Ohio Compost Operator Education Course, planned for anyone involved with commercial and large-scale composting, is coming soon, set for March 27–28 on CFAES’ Wooster campus. Some of the many topics to be covered: principles, biology, testing, marketing, and site design and management.

Registration is $275 for the first participant from an organization or company; $225 for each additional participant from the same organization or company; and includes materials, continental breakfast, and lunch.

For a list of all the topics, location and other details, and a registration form, download the flyer for the course.

He’s working to help all of us cut food waste

“A lot of people say, ‘Oh, they waste so much food at restaurants and supermarkets. I’ve seen the dumpsters at the back of the stores. It’s terrible.’ In truth, it’s consumers in households where most of the food waste occurs.” So says Brian Roe, pictured, professor in CFAES’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, who studies food waste and how to reduce it and leads the Ohio State Food Waste Collaborative.

Keep reading on CFAES’s Stories website.