CFAES partnering with Cargill

CFAES and Cargill are sowing the seeds of a new partnership.

The Minnesota-based agricultural company recently started supporting the work of the college’s six new water quality associates. Based in northwest Ohio, the six associates are part of a project by the CFAES Water Quality Initiative.

Continue reading

CFAES’ Lal wins World Food Prize

The honors keep growing for Rattan Lal. The CFAES Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science—recipient of the Japan Prize last year and the World Agriculture Prize and the Glinka World Soil Prize in 2018—was today awarded the World Food Prize.

The award, its website says, recognizes “the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world.”

Gebisa Ejeta, chair of the award’s selection committee and a 2009 recipient of the award, said, “The impact of (Lal’s) research and advocacy on sustainability of agriculture and the environment cannot be overstressed.”

Read more.

Peace, stability start in the soil

Republished from the Winter 2019–20 issue of CFAES’ Continuum magazine. Read the issue.

Even in the presence of royalty, the conversation was down to earth. And that was totally appropriate.

In a formal ceremony in April 2019 in Tokyo, CFAES soil scientist Rattan Lal received a 2019 Japan Prize, one of the most prestigious global awards in science and technology.

Continue reading

How to grow grains despite climate change

How can farmers help their grain crops handle climate change? CFAES researchers Rafiq Islam and Alan Sundermeier will suggest practices at the upcoming annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA). Their workshop, “2020 Climate-Smart Organic Grains for Healthy Soils, Healthy Food, and Healthy People,” is set for 8:30–10 a.m. Feb. 14. 

The entire OEFFA conference, the largest ecological agriculture conference in Ohio, runs from Feb. 13–15 in Dayton.

Continue reading

World Soil Day, world soil expert

Celebrate World Soil Day today, Dec. 5, by reading a recent story about CFAES’ own world soil expert, Rattan Lal, Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science, who received the Glinka World Soil Prize on last year’s World Soil Day and the Japan Prize shortly after that.

“In just a handful of soil,” the Ohio State Alumni Magazine story begins, “Rattan Lal ’68 PhD sees the key to feeding people, to preserving their land for generations, to making Earth a better place for all of us.”

Read the full story, and watch the related video above.

Breakfast to feature Ohio soil experts

The next monthly breakfast program by the CFAES-based Environmental Professionals Network will have you “Digging in With Ohio’s Soil Experts”—including Rattan Lal, CFAES’ 2019 Japan Prize laureate and Glinka World Soil Prize recipient—on the hows and whys of having healthy soils. It’s set for Wednesday, Dec. 4, the day before World Soil Day. Unearth details and register to join us.

Ohio’s farm crisis: Why leaving a field unplanted can hurt it

Some 1.5 million acres of Ohio’s farm fields—an area twice the size of Rhode Island—didn’t have any corn, soybeans, or other cash crops planted on them this year. Reason: Record spring rain made the ground too wet to plant. Now those fields are at risk of problems from something called fallow syndrome, which is caused by the loss of crop-friendly microbes that live—or lived—in the fields’ soils.

Experts from CFAES explain. (Photo: Getty Images.)

A day to make the most of manure

You’ll find lots of fertile topics for discussion at this year’s Manure Science Review. Set for Wednesday, Aug. 7, at JIMITA Holsteins in Strasburg, Ohio, the event will keep you up to date on putting manure to good use. Featured will be talks by CFAES and other experts, field demonstrations, and a tour of Bull Country Compost located nearby in Dundee. Registration is $25 by July 30; $30 after July 30; and includes coffee, doughnuts, lunch, and the tour. Participants can earn credits for continuing education. Get details. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Regenerative agriculture a ‘win-win-win’

An op-ed in the May 13 edition of the Los Angeles Times quotes CFAES scientist Rattan Lal on the benefits of regenerative agriculture—practices such as using compost, minimizing tillage, and growing cover crops. Regenerative agriculture is a “win-win-win option” that can make the soil healthier, increase food production, and help fight climate change, he is quoted as saying. But it is “not widely understood” yet by policymakers, the public, and many farmers.

Lal, a recent recipient of the prestigious Japan Prize, is Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science in CFAES’ School of Environment and Natural Resources.

Read the op-ed.