It’s actually pretty refreshing

Discover new and better ways to manage manure — methods that boost soil fertility, crop yields and farm profits while protecting water and the environment — at the annual Manure Science Review on Aug. 2 in western Ohio.

CFAES’s outreach arm, OSU Extension, is a co-host of the event.

A manure sidedress for a new occasion

CFAES’s Glen Arnold and Sam Custer have developed a way to spread liquid manure on young growing field crops like corn. Their new design serves to (1) boost the plants’ uptake of the valuable nutrients in the manure, (2) save farmers money on manure disposal and fertilizer costs, all while (3) reducing the risk of the nutrients getting into water. Read the story.

Growing with active organic matter: OEFFA conference preview

Potato leaves, close upOrganic matter’s good for the soil. And also for crops and water. But it’s not all created equal. At next week’s annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, CFAES scientist Steve Culman will talk specifically about active organic matter: how it cycles rapidly, how it plays a big role in providing nutrients to crops, how soil tests measure it, what CFAES research is learning about it, and how you can enroll to have your soil tested for free in an ongoing study. “Active Organic Matter in Your Soil,” Session V, 1:30 to 3 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11. Complete conference schedule.

CFAES’s Lal is a Highly Cited Researcher

Rattan Lal’s work, you could say, is very fertile. The CFAES scientist, who’s a Distinguished University Professor of soil science in the School of Environment and Natural Resources, was recently profiled as one of Thomson Reuters’ Highly Cited Researchers. “For nearly four decades,” says the story by Sarah Tanksalvala, “Lal has been a leader in addressing soil as a key aspect of the biggest issues facing our planet today.” Read the story.

Today: Projects, goals for helping soil fertility on Ohio farms

CFAES scientist Steve Culman, assistant professor of soil fertility and management in the School of Environment and Natural Resources, presents “Fertile or Futile? What Lies Ahead for Soil Fertility Research for Ohio Farmlands” at 11:30 a.m. today in the spring seminar series of the college’s Department of Horticulture and Crop Science. Details.