How honey bees get through winter; or, why don’t bees’ knees freeze?

With cold weather here, WOSU Public Media’s Phil Deoliveira looked at how Ohio beekeepers and their charges get through winter. CFAES entomologist Reed Johnson was one of the experts quoted, speaking on the importance of bees storing enough honey to eat to last through winter. “It’s not freezing to death that kills bees,” he said. “It’s running out of food and then freezing to death that kills them.” (Photo: Johnson in warmer times by Ken Chamberlain, CFAES Marketing and Communications.)

‘Power of Pollinators’ open house is Sept. 12

The Ecolab project on Ohio State’s Mansfield campus hosts its Power of Pollinators Open House from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 12, at 1760 University Drive. Admission is free and includes snacks, plants and seed packets.

Populations of pollinators — bees, butterflies and others — have seen significant drops in recent years, and the event will look at ways to help them. Talks will cover “Native Bees in Your Backyard,” “Pollinators Need Woodlands, Too!” and “Native Plant ID and Seed Collection.”

Participants should meet at the Monarch Right-of-Way demonstration plots in front of Ovalwood Hall.

For details, call CFAES wildlife program specialist Marne Titchenell, one of the event’s speakers, at 614-292-0402.

Learn how to name that bee

CFAES is co-sponsoring a bee biology and identification workshop on four dates in August in northeast and central Ohio.

The workshop is called Bees in Your Backyard … and the Plants They Visit, and the instructor will be Olivia Carril, biologist and co-author of The Bees in Your Backyard (Princeton University Press, 2015).

Register for the workshop online.

Bee there for April 4 panel discussion

CFAES bee researcher Reed Johnson, pictured, will join a panel discussion on pollinators — their value to people and ecosystems, how pesticides are affecting them, and more — from 7-9 p.m. April 4 in University Hall on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. Free admission, and free food (Chipotle) while it lasts.

It’s one in a series of sustainability-related events planned for Ohio State’s Time for Change Week, April 3-9. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

A handy new guide to the bees in your garden

Image of bumble bee 2Ohio’s bees are more than honey bees. They’re bumble bees (like this one), carpenter bees, cuckoo bees and others, and you can identify more than a dozen of them — types you’re likely to see in your garden — using a new pocket card from CFAES. (Photo: David Cappaert, Bugwood.org.)

Bees exposed to ‘wide, concerning range of pesticides’: Study

Honey bees living next to corn and soybean fields are “exposed to a surprisingly wide and concerning range of pesticides,” according to a May 31 Newsweek story about research involving CFAES insect scientist Elizabeth Long, who was at Purdue University at the time of the study. There’s a video interview, too, with the story.