There’s now a maple syrup that was made on Kelleys Island

Speaking of maple syrup, CFAES’ Buckeye Yard & Garden onLine website yesterday told the story of a new project on Kelleys Island, which lies in Lake Erie. Two CFAES educators, Thomas deHaas and Les Ober, were among the project’s collaborators, and in the end the team’s work boiled down to a first: the inaugural batch of Kelleys Island “Glacially Groovy” maple syrup. (Photo: A (maple-less) scene on Kelleys Island, Getty Images.)

And which maples would those be?

“While sugar maple is considered ‘the’ tree to tap for syrup, there are also other maples you can tap.” 

Those are the words of Kathy Smith, forestry program director for the CFAES School of Environment and Natural Resources. She’s one of the organizers of our upcoming Maple Bootcamp, which will let you know which maples those are, along with a whole lot more.

For Buckeye fans, this is totally sweet

(Updated, Dec. 9: The one-quart and one-gallon jugs are now sold out. In addition, until further notice, in-person pick-up is no longer an option due to Franklin County’s pandemic status.)

(Updated, Oct. 13: You can now order online for delivery to your home.)

Buckeye fans now can pour official Ohio State Maple Syrup on their pancakes. It comes from the university’s Mansfield campus, where students and faculty with CFAES’ School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR) planned and are running a nearly 20-acre sugarbush. A sugarbush is a maple tree forest used to produce maple syrup.

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How farmers can sell their food to schools

CFAES’ Agriculture and Natural Resources Madness series continues today, Monday, April 20, with “How Producers Can Start Selling Food to Schools” at noon and “How Producers and Food Related Businesses Can Start Farm to School Efforts” at 3 p.m. Find the links to watch.

Today’s first session, “Starting a Farm to School Program,” has ended, but you can find the link to the replay here.

Viewing the sessions in the series is free. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Fresh Ohio veggies in winter? Here’s why

Chances are you’ve been noticing more Ohio-grown produce at your grocer, and not just in summer but in winter, too.

Turns out there are good reasons for it, including a red-hot industry, support from CFAES, and warm, cozy shelter from the storms.

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Secrets of Ohio’s mystery fruit revealed

New on our CFAES Stories site: Details on CFAES efforts to help Ohioans grow more of a little-known native fruit. Fun fact: Ohio brewers are using it lately to good effect in craft beers. Read the story. (Photo: CFAES’ Matt Davies with the fruit tree in question, John Rice, CFAES.)