‘Know more, waste less’

“As future leaders in the food and agriculture industry, we believe it is our social responsibility to consume and produce food in a conscientious manner.”

So says CFAES PhD student Aishwarya Badiger in our latest CFAES Story, which looks at her work with Know Food Waste, an award-winning CFAES student group.

Read the story.

CFAES sustainability news, March 22, 2021

As millions go hungry, here’s how to reduce food waste in PA

Patch, March 19; research by Danyi Qi and Brian Roe, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, cited

Free gardening webinar series geared toward plant lovers with physical limitations

Wooster Daily Record, March 18; featuring Laura Akgerman and Pam Bennett, OSU Extension

CFAES sustainability news, March 8, 2021

WCMH-TV, Columbus, March 8; featuring Yolanda Owens ’07, CFAES alumna and president of CFAES Alumni Society

17 percent of food wasted globally, UN report finds

Baltimore Sun (via AP), March 4; featuring Brian Roe, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics

CFAES reads for Sept. 10, 2020

Pandemic-related cooking and eating habits could help curb food waste—if consumers stick to them

Washington Post, Aug. 31; featuring Brian Roe, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics

Farming releases carbon from the Earth’s soil into the air. Can we put it back?

NPR, Aug. 18; featuring Rattan Lal, School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR)

A watershed moment for U.S. water quality

Ohio State News, Aug. 13; featuring Mažeika Sullivan, SENR

Learning from what’s in the can

Ohio State student employees are digging through garbage cans full of thrown-away food — messy, sloppy, smelly, tossed food — in the name of sustainability. They’re helping with food waste audits being done to help the university try to meet one of its sustainability goals: diverting 90 percent of its waste from landfills by 2025. Read the full story.

In the meantime, researchers will share results from the audits at Ohio State’s Oct. 11 Food Waste Collaborative Conference, which CFAES is sponsoring. Glean further details on the conference’s website, including a link to register.

If buried in a landfill, discarded food rots and produces methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Limiting landfilled food waste reduces that methane production and in turn helps slow human-caused climate change.

He’s working to help all of us cut food waste

“A lot of people say, ‘Oh, they waste so much food at restaurants and supermarkets. I’ve seen the dumpsters at the back of the stores. It’s terrible.’ In truth, it’s consumers in households where most of the food waste occurs.” So says Brian Roe, pictured, professor in CFAES’s Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, who studies food waste and how to reduce it and leads the Ohio State Food Waste Collaborative.

Keep reading on CFAES’s Stories website.

Turning food waste into tires

Tomorrow’s tires could come from the farm as much as the factory.

CFAES scientists have discovered that food waste can partially replace the petroleum-based filler that has been used in manufacturing tires for more than a century.

In tests, rubber made with the new fillers exceeds industrial standards for performance, which may ultimately open up new applications for rubber.

Read the story. (Photo: CFAES scientists Katrina Cornish (left) and Cindy Barrera by Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

The challenge? Do both: Waste less food, AND compost what’s wasted

Two key ways to manage food waste — educating people about it and composting it — seem to work at odds, Marion Renault wrote last week in the Columbus Dispatch, reporting on research by CFAES’s Danyi Qi and Brian Roe.

That is, the researchers found, people will waste more food if they know it will be composted — by, say, the restaurant that served it. But they’ll waste less if they know about such issues as filled-up landfills and the harmful methane dumped food waste puts in the air.

The challenge, Qi said in the story, is to get the two methods — education and composting — working not in conflict but in harmony. Read the story.