Teaching kids how to grow food

Next in the ongoing Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series, see an award-winning youth garden focused on food insecurity, year-round growing, hands-on learning, and gardening and nutrition education. It’s Saturday, Aug. 17, at the Highland Youth Garden, located in Columbus’ Hilltop neighborhood. Find out more.

CFAES is one of the series presenters and is the specific presenter of this tour.

How vacant lots can become urban farms

A tour this Saturday, Aug. 10, part of both the Columbus Urban Farm Tour Series and Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series, will show how to turn vacant lots into urban farms—producing healthy food for people and improving neighborhoods in the process (p. 3).

CFAES is a co-sponsor of both series.

‘Train a farmer, feed a nation’

A recent edition of CSA News, a magazine published jointly by three agriculture-related U.S. professional societies, features the efforts of Warren Dick, CFAES emeritus professor of soil science, in starting a new agricultural university in food-insecure Ethiopia.

‘Demonstrating a sense of hope’

You’re invited to check out the oldest working urban farm in Columbus.

The Pioneering Urban Farm Tour, set for 10–11:30 a.m. Saturday, July 13, features Four Seasons City Farm, a nonprofit urban garden serving Columbus’s Near East neighborhood. Started in 2004, and now with four locations, the farm grows berries, tree fruits, vegetables, and more.

Continue reading

These students and crops are for change

Some Ohio State students are spending their summer helping fight hunger. Working at the 4-acre Ohio State Student Farm, located at CFAES’ Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory in Columbus, the students are growing more than 30 kinds of fruits and vegetables, are learning about and practicing urban farming, and are donating some of what they grow to local food security efforts.

Read more in a new CFAES Story called “Crops for change.”

‘How do we keep ourselves properly soiled?’

Forbes writer Bruce Y. Lee featured the work of CFAES scientist Rattan Lal, Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science, in an April 14 article titled “Here Is a Major Soil Problem That Will Affect Health.”

“The dirt on soil,” Lee writes, “is that it may be playing a major role in climate change, food security, and thus human health.”

Lal and Ohio State President Michael V. Drake, MD, are both quoted in the story on how, around the world, erosion, depletion, and other problems caused by poor soil management are threatening people’s ability to grow enough food.

Read the story.

Lal received the 2019 Japan Prize, one of the most prestigious honors in science and technology, in an official ceremony on April 11 in Tokyo.

He speaks on the award and his work in the video above.

Today in Tokyo

Watch the ceremony. Read about Rattan Lal receiving the Japan Prize.

Watch: Rattan Lal receives Japan Prize

CFAES soil scientist Rattan Lal formally received the Japan Prize today, Monday, April 8, in Tokyo. You can watch the ceremony in the video above. Ohio State President Michael V. Drake, First Lady Brenda Drake, and CFAES Wooster Director Dave Benfield were among the delegation from Ohio State attending the ceremony. The Japan Prize is considered one of the most prestigious honors in science and technology.

Friday: Community gardens, ‘Blackout’ concert

Ohio State’s 2019 Time for Change Week continues on Friday, April 5, with:

  • A presentation on community gardens, including how to run them and how they can improve a neighborhood’s food security, by members of the student group Nourish International, 11 a.m. to noon. Find out more.
  • Buckeye Blackout Concert, 6–9 p.m. “Lights out, get loud!” the event listing says. “Join us for a night of student and local bands, friends, and sustainable giveaways, all against the backdrop of Mirror Lake.”

Glean further details.