Mansfield event will showcase microfarms

The Mansfield Microfarm Project—an effort to demonstrate small-scale, high-yield, sustainable urban farming based at Ohio State’s Mansfield campus—is holding a free public symposium on Friday, Nov. 15. The program will feature site visits to newly constructed urban microfarms and presentations on research and programming by the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, which has provided a $2 million matching grant in support of the microfarm project.

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Lessons from Bangladesh on climate change

Bangladesh, a country of 165 million in southern Asia, can teach the world a lot about climate change—how everything from climate to food to migration to economics is intertwined. So says CFAES development economist Joyce Chen, featured in our latest CFAES Story.

Ohio’s farm crisis: Why leaving a field unplanted can hurt it

Some 1.5 million acres of Ohio’s farm fields—an area twice the size of Rhode Island—didn’t have any corn, soybeans, or other cash crops planted on them this year. Reason: Record spring rain made the ground too wet to plant. Now those fields are at risk of problems from something called fallow syndrome, which is caused by the loss of crop-friendly microbes that live—or lived—in the fields’ soils.

Experts from CFAES explain. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Secrets of Ohio’s mystery fruit revealed

New on our CFAES Stories site: Details on CFAES efforts to help Ohioans grow more of a little-known native fruit. Fun fact: Ohio brewers are using it lately to good effect in craft beers. Read the story. (Photo: CFAES’ Matt Davies with the fruit tree in question, John Rice, CFAES.)

Boosting BMPs

What’s keeping some farmers from changing their fertilization practices—changes aimed at reducing nutrient runoff and improving Lake Erie’s water quality? Skepticism more than anything else, CFAES behavioral scientist Robyn Wilson said in a recent story.

What’s the solution? Wilson speaks on the subject (“Designing Policies and Programs to Increase BMP Adoption Rates”) Sept. 12 at the Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science conference in Toledo. Registration runs through Sept. 6.

Our growing history with biosolids

That small corn patch you see in this photo, which is growing—indeed, thriving—in the middle of Ohio State’s Columbus campus, is part of a wider, sustainability-related project meant to show how biosolids—processed human waste from sewage—can be (and historically have been) used to help grow food. Get the full poop in our latest CFAES Story.