Get details on grazing and forages

(Photo: Angus, Friesian, Guernsey and Jersey cows and calves, Getty Images.)

CFAES’s Gwynne Conservation Area will offer a track of sessions specifically about grazing and forages during Farm Science Review, set for Sept. 18-20 in London, Ohio. Here’s a look at the lineup.

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How to teach about aquaponics, learn about hydroponics

If you’re an educator, and you’re interested in a hands-on way to teach your students about science and producing food, consider attending “Aquaponics in the Classroom: Teaching Real-World Skills Through Conservation,” a session at next month’s CFAES-sponsored Farm Science Review trade show. The session runs from 11-11:30 a.m. on the second day of the Review, Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Gwynne Conservation Area. The session is free with paid admission to the Review.

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‘Beacon of hope’ raises fish and veggies

The Columbus Urban Farm Tour Series continues with a stop at Project AquaStar, an expanded aquaculture and vegetable farm, from 10:30 a.m. to noon Aug. 23.

Located at St. Stephen’s Community House in Columbus, the farm produces, among other things, herbs, vegetables and tilapia through aquaponics. By improving food security and health awareness, it’s “become a beacon of hope in the Linden community,” according to the house’s website.

Free admission. Find out more.

Homeless garden tour in Columbus

See the food and good growing in Columbus’s Friends of the Homeless Garden when the Columbus Urban Farm Tour Series hosts a visit called “Urban Community Garden Serving Homeless Men” from noon to 1:30 p.m. Aug. 19. Admission is free. Find further details. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Soil and water event in Piketon

CFAES’s Soil and Water Field Night, set for the Ohio State University South Centers in Piketon and featuring sessions on soil health, corn disorders and managing weeds, runs from 5-9 p.m. Aug. 16.

Admission is free, a light dinner is included, but you have to register in advance by contacting Sarah Swanson at 740-289-2071, ext. 112, or swanson.345@osu.edu.

See the full schedule and find out more. (Photo: CFAES.)

No more guessing at nitrogen levels?

Scientists from CFAES and Cornell University are developing a fast way for farmers to test the nitrogen levels in their soils. Nitrogen is a nutrient, provided in fertilizer, that’s key to the growth of crops. Not enough of it, and crops don’t produce as much food as they should. But too much, and the excess can be washed away from a crop field by rain and get into lakes and streams, possibly causing algal blooms and “dead zones” or, in its nitrate form, making drinking water unsafe for pregnant women and babies.

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See what’s new in growing crops in muck

CFAES’s 2018 Muck Crops Field Day, featuring the latest research on growing veggies in muck soil, is Thursday, July 26, at the college’s Muck Crops Agricultural Research Station near Willard.

The muck soil located at the station, left behind after a large swamp was drained more than a century ago, is much higher in organic matter than typical Ohio soil. As a result, high-value crops such as lettuce grow fast and well there. (Photo: Field day at the station, 2013, CFAES.)

The world’s first ‘intelligent’ pesticide sprayer is good for both growers and the environment

It’s not often that a grower comes across a piece of new equipment that can give a full return on investment in one year and can reduce their farm’s impact on the environment.

But a device made by researchers from CFAES and from the U.S. Department of Agriculture is promising just that.

The team’s “intelligent” pesticide sprayer is the first automatic spraying system of its kind in the world.

Read more in the latest story on our CFAES Stories website.

Got muck? Ohio does. Here’s what it’s like

Aptly named Celeryville, located near Willard in Huron County, is the home of CFAES’s Muck Crops Agricultural Research Station. The black fertile soil there was left after a group of Dutch immigrants, working with a local entrepreneur, drained what was then called the Willard Marsh. It happened in the late 1800s.

Today, the area’s farms serve as Ohio’s salad bowl, growing lush lettuce and more quickly and well. The station, for its part, conducts research to help the farms do that even better. But the work and soil have their challenges. Read more on our CFAES Stories website. (Photo: Station manager Bob Filbrun, Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)