How to grow grains despite climate change

How can farmers help their grain crops handle climate change? CFAES researchers Rafiq Islam and Alan Sundermeier will suggest practices at the upcoming annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA). Their workshop, “2020 ClimateSmart Organic Grains for Healthy Soils, Healthy Food, and Healthy People,” is set for 8:30–10 a.m. Feb. 14. 

The entire OEFFA conference, the largest ecological agriculture conference in Ohio, runs from Feb. 13–15 in Dayton.

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Fresh Ohio veggies in winter? Here’s why

Chances are you’ve been noticing more Ohio-grown produce at your grocer, and not just in summer but in winter, too.

Turns out there are good reasons for it, including a red-hot industry, support from CFAES, and warm, cozy shelter from the storms.

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Safe, sustainable greenhouse production: Workshop set for Wooster

Sustainable, safe crop production will be the theme of CFAES’ 22nd annual Greenhouse Management Workshop, set for Jan. 16–17, 2020, in Wooster. There’s also an option for attending online.

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Nov. 21: Organic research meeting for CFAESers

CFAES’ Organic Food and Farming Education and Research (OFFER) program is hosting “Positioning Ohio as a Leader in Organics,” a meeting to discuss future organic research priorities and resources, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, at the CFAES Wooster campus.

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Mansfield event will showcase microfarms

The Mansfield Microfarm Project—an effort to demonstrate small-scale, high-yield, sustainable urban farming based at Ohio State’s Mansfield campus—is holding a free public symposium on Friday, Nov. 15. The program will feature site visits to newly constructed urban microfarms and presentations on research and programming by the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, which has provided a $2 million matching grant in support of the microfarm project.

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Lessons from Bangladesh on climate change

Bangladesh, a country of 165 million in southern Asia, can teach the world a lot about climate change—how everything from climate to food to migration to economics is intertwined. So says CFAES development economist Joyce Chen, featured in our latest CFAES Story.

Ohio’s farm crisis: Why leaving a field unplanted can hurt it

Some 1.5 million acres of Ohio’s farm fields—an area twice the size of Rhode Island—didn’t have any corn, soybeans, or other cash crops planted on them this year. Reason: Record spring rain made the ground too wet to plant. Now those fields are at risk of problems from something called fallow syndrome, which is caused by the loss of crop-friendly microbes that live—or lived—in the fields’ soils.

Experts from CFAES explain. (Photo: Getty Images.)

Secrets of Ohio’s mystery fruit revealed

New on our CFAES Stories site: Details on CFAES efforts to help Ohioans grow more of a little-known native fruit. Fun fact: Ohio brewers are using it lately to good effect in craft beers. Read the story. (Photo: CFAES’ Matt Davies with the fruit tree in question, John Rice, CFAES.)