CFAES sustainability news, Feb. 11, 2022

Ice cover could help Lake Erie’s struggling yellow perch as reduced fishing limits loom

Columbus Dispatch, Feb. 6, 2022; Ohio State research cited

Dozens of Great Lakes scientists join rare February sampling campaign to study ‘the changing face of winter’

Mirage News, Feb. 3, 2022; Ohio State researchers included

How to ID Ohio’s aquatic invasive species

Want some good cold-weather reading? Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program offers a 160-page PDF e-book called Ohio Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive Species, with color photos for identifying aquatic invasive species and tips for preventing their introduction and spread. Featured are fish, plants, algae, mussels, crustaceans and others, including bighead carp, silver carp, didymo (an alga also called “rock snot”), fishhook waterflea, red swamp crayfish and Eurasian watermilfoil, to name just a few.

Ohio Sea Grant Specialist Tory Gabriel and Eugene Braig, CFAES aquatic ecosystems program director, helped produce the guide, whose introduction says, “Identifying and preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species are the keys to averting long-term ecosystem damage and ensuring the highest probability of effective control.”

Find details and links for downloading the guide.

Catch this lecture

Stone Lab’s 2018 summer guest lecture series wraps up at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, with “Fish Management in the 21st Century” by Rich Carter, executive administrator of the Fish Management Group in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife; and a research brief called “Invasive Species Management and Research: Are We Working at the Same Scales?” by University of Toledo ecology professor Jonathan Bossenbroek.

Admission is free and open to the public. Learn more about the program and how to attend. You also can watch online.

Stone Lab, part of CFAES, is located at Put-in-Bay on Lake Erie. (Photo: Stone Lab Lake Erie sport fishing workshop, 2016, Tory Gabriel, Ohio Sea Grant, via Flickr.)

And also there were snapping turtles

“Simply moving across the slick, gloopy wetlands was difficult.”

So says an article about how Ohio Sea Grant- and CFAES-affiliated researchers are helping The Nature Conservancy to (1) improve water quality and (2) give homes to fish and wildlife by restoring a large marshland near Lake Erie. (Photo: iStock.)

Now THAT sounds intriguing

Hanping Wang, director of CFAES’s Ohio Aquaculture Research and Development Integration Program, has succeeded in raising faster-growing fish — yellow perch and bluegills — “by artificially mating them in a not so typical way.” Ultimately, the breakthrough should have benefits to keeping Ohio fish farmers profitable, producing healthy protein for people and preventing overfishing of wild fish for food. It’s one of our CFAES Stories.