How to ID Ohio’s aquatic invasive species

Want some good cold-weather reading? Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program offers a 160-page PDF e-book called Ohio Field Guide to Aquatic Invasive Species, with color photos for identifying aquatic invasive species and tips for preventing their introduction and spread. Featured are fish, plants, algae, mussels, crustaceans and others, including bighead carp, silver carp, didymo (an alga also called “rock snot”), fishhook waterflea, red swamp crayfish and Eurasian watermilfoil, to name just a few.

Ohio Sea Grant Specialist Tory Gabriel and Eugene Braig, CFAES aquatic ecosystems program director, helped produce the guide, whose introduction says, “Identifying and preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species are the keys to averting long-term ecosystem damage and ensuring the highest probability of effective control.”

Find details and links for downloading the guide.

Catch this lecture

Stone Lab’s 2018 summer guest lecture series wraps up at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, with “Fish Management in the 21st Century” by Rich Carter, executive administrator of the Fish Management Group in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife; and a research brief called “Invasive Species Management and Research: Are We Working at the Same Scales?” by University of Toledo ecology professor Jonathan Bossenbroek.

Admission is free and open to the public. Learn more about the program and how to attend. You also can watch online.

Stone Lab, part of CFAES, is located at Put-in-Bay on Lake Erie. (Photo: Stone Lab Lake Erie sport fishing workshop, 2016, Tory Gabriel, Ohio Sea Grant, via Flickr.)

And also there were snapping turtles

“Simply moving across the slick, gloopy wetlands was difficult.”

So says an article about how Ohio Sea Grant- and CFAES-affiliated researchers are helping The Nature Conservancy to (1) improve water quality and (2) give homes to fish and wildlife by restoring a large marshland near Lake Erie. (Photo: iStock.)

Now THAT sounds intriguing

Hanping Wang, director of CFAES’s Ohio Aquaculture Research and Development Integration Program, has succeeded in raising faster-growing fish — yellow perch and bluegills — “by artificially mating them in a not so typical way.” Ultimately, the breakthrough should have benefits to keeping Ohio fish farmers profitable, producing healthy protein for people and preventing overfishing of wild fish for food. It’s one of our CFAES Stories.

If you teach a person about fish

… you feed them for a lifetime. Congratulations to CFAES’s Suzanne Gray, assistant professor of aquatic physiological ecology, School of Environment and Natural Resources, who today was named a recipient of Ohio State’s top honor for teaching. Gray is the fourth from the left.

This talk is rec’d for fish fans

Florida International University’s Jennifer Rehage presents “Understanding the Dynamics and Sustainability of Recreational Fisheries: Patterns, Drivers, Space and Time in Bonefish (Albula vulpes) in South Florida” from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8 in 164 Howlett Hall, 2001 Fyffe Road, on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. Learn more.

Her talk is part of a seminar series hosted by CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources.

For background, read Global FlyFisher’s quick treatise on bonefish biology. (Photo: A totally cool-looking bonefish, iStock.)

Stream fish sampler; or, a shocking display

Cool demo Wednesday afternoon in Farm Science Review’s Gwynne Conservation Area: electrofishing, a nonlethal way to sample fish populations, by three helpfully informative Ohio Division of Wildlife fisheries biologists.

Rock bass, longear sunfish, smallmouth bass, bluntnose minnows and two darter species, among others, were shocked with a DC current, briefly stunned, netted and then safely released in the Gwynne’s stretch of Deer Creek. The darters indicated good water quality and habitat.

Farm Science Review continues through 4 p.m. today.

This is not a rock concert, it’s a bleeding splish splash show

The June 11 breakfast program by the Environmental Professionals Network (see our previous post) takes place at the Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park Nature Center near Columbus. The center houses, among other things, a totally cool 53-foot indoor living stream. In the video above, watch some of the stream’s residents have a nosh themselves. Turtle cameo in 3 … 2 …

National Climate Assessment poem, Midwest edition, #6: Great Lakes at Greater Risk

Lake ErieKey Message 6 for the Midwest, “Increased Risks to the Great Lakes,” from the third National Climate Assessment, released May 6, 2014 (first post):

Climate change will exacerbate

A range of risks to the Great Lakes,

including changes in the range and distribution of certain fish species,

increased invasive species and harmful blooms of algae,

and declining beach health.

Ice cover declines

will lengthen the commercial navigation season.

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