All about that bass (and its friends)

What fish live in Lake Erie? Find out at “Walleye, Perch, and Bass, Oh My!” (which are three good clues right there), the next Ohio Sea Grant science talk at Lakeside Chautauqua on the Marblehead peninsula. You’ll meet some finny friends and then will hear about what concerns them. It’s from 2–3 p.m. on Tuesday, July 16.

Admission to the talk is free but requires paid admission to Lakeside and a parking pass.

Find out more. (Photo: Smallmouth bass, Eric Engbretson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.)

Seein’ you wherever I go … or not

Walleye and the smaller fish they eat “struggle to see in water clouded by algae, and that could potentially jeopardize the species’ future if harmful algal blooms persist.” So said a story by Ohio State science writer Misti Crane, reporting on a study led by CFAES scientist Suzanne Gray.

Algal blooms, like those in Lake Erie, can turn the water green.

Also: Read an earlier, delightful interview with Gray.

Catch this lecture

Stone Lab’s 2018 summer guest lecture series wraps up at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, with “Fish Management in the 21st Century” by Rich Carter, executive administrator of the Fish Management Group in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife; and a research brief called “Invasive Species Management and Research: Are We Working at the Same Scales?” by University of Toledo ecology professor Jonathan Bossenbroek.

Admission is free and open to the public. Learn more about the program and how to attend. You also can watch online.

Stone Lab, part of CFAES, is located at Put-in-Bay on Lake Erie. (Photo: Stone Lab Lake Erie sport fishing workshop, 2016, Tory Gabriel, Ohio Sea Grant, via Flickr.)

How your pond can produce more fish

The Intensifying Pond Production of Fish workshop, its website says, will help pond fish producers “to intensify their operation and grow more pounds of fish per acre of water.” It’s July 14 in Marysville in central Ohio, in part at the Millcreek Perch Farm. CFAES’s Aquaculture Boot Camp is a co-host.

Find out more. (Photo: Yellow perch, Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

Watch: What people mean to water mean to fish

CFAES scientist Suzanne Gray explains her research connecting water quality, aquatic diversity and human activities in the video above. It’s her lightning-round talk (6:36) from CFAES’s Annual Research Conference. How do fish — from bluegills in the Scioto River, to walleyes in western Lake Erie, to cichlids in the Nile River basin — respond to rapid changes in their water caused by people?

Continue reading

Now THAT sounds intriguing

Hanping Wang, director of CFAES’s Ohio Aquaculture Research and Development Integration Program, has succeeded in raising faster-growing fish — yellow perch and bluegills — “by artificially mating them in a not so typical way.” Ultimately, the breakthrough should have benefits to keeping Ohio fish farmers profitable, producing healthy protein for people and preventing overfishing of wild fish for food. It’s one of our CFAES Stories.

If you teach a person about fish

… you feed them for a lifetime. Congratulations to CFAES’s Suzanne Gray, assistant professor of aquatic physiological ecology, School of Environment and Natural Resources, who today was named a recipient of Ohio State’s top honor for teaching. Gray is the fourth from the left.