How do you spell farming success?

Here’s another reason to celebrate Ohio Agriculture Week, March 10–16:

Every year, more than 100,000 farmers, their families, their friends, and other agricultural professionals—enough people to fill Ohio Stadium—go to CFAES’ Farm Science Review. There, they visit more than 600 exhibitors from CFAES and industry, who share their latest research findings, new tractor models and other farm equipment, harvesting demonstrations, and more.

It’s a celebration of agriculture in Ohio, a way to keep improving the industry, and also includes activities geared to small farms and conservation.

Read a wrapup of last year here. See a photo feature on last year’s Review-goers here (anyone you know?). Visit the Review’s website here.

Pictured is the world’s largest Script Ohio, done in soybeans, created last year near the site of the Review using GPS-guided “smart planting.”

Is more, heavier rain the new norm?

Weather extremes like those seen last year in Ohio, including more rainfall, heavier downpours, and warmer temperatures, will likely become the norm rather than the exception, says CFAES climate specialist Aaron Wilson. He says farmers in the state may need to make adjustments to deal with the extra water. Read the story.

On March 26, Wilson speaks on the topic in Shelby.

Hemp farming in Ohio? TBD

Peggy Kirk Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist with CFAES, was interviewed for a recent story by WOSU Public Media headlined “Hemp Is Poised For A Production Boom, But Ohio Might Get Left Out.” Read the story.

The 2018 Farm Bill, approved by Congress but awaiting President Trump’s signature at the time of this writing (Dec. 18), allows states to decide for themselves if they want hemp farming. (Graphic by Getty Images.)

How small-, medium-sized farms can diversify for greater success

CFAES holds its 2017 Agricultural Diversification Research Tour from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. this Thursday, Aug. 17, at OARDC’s Mellinger Research Farm, 6885 W. Old Lincoln Way, in Wooster. The focus is on how small- and medium-sized farms can widen their product range and increase their profitability without having to get bigger in size. Free. Learn more. OARDC is CFAES’s research arm.

It’s a great Pumpkin Field Day, Charlie Brown

The Western Agricultural Research Station of OARDC, CFAES’s research arm, is holding its Pumpkin Field Day for growers on Aug. 17. What’ll you get? Research updates by OARDC scientists on weed, disease and pest management and on new pumpkin and winter squash varieties.

Registration is $5. You can register to attend online.

Ohio’s 2016 pumpkin crop, 6,700 acres in all, had a production value of more than $16 million, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

OARDC’s Western branch is in South Charleston, about 40 miles west of Columbus.

We’ve got the local meat. Now how do we sell it? OEFFA conference preview

grilled beef steakMarketing locally raised meat can be “time consuming, costly and complex,” says the description of Hannah Scott’s workshop at the upcoming Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association annual conference. But the challenges, the description says, can be addressed by using the cooperative business model. Scott, who’s program manager of the Ohio Cooperative Development Center at CFAES’s OSU South Centers in Piketon, will explain the model in her workshop. She’ll give good examples of farmers who’ve teamed up to market their meat with success. “Local Meats and the Co-op Model,” Session IV, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 11. Complete conference schedule.