Can beef be part of a sustainable food system?

Sara Place, senior director of sustainable beef production research with the Centennial, Colorado-based National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, presents “Beef in a Sustainable Food System” (“Can a sustainable global food system include beef?”) from 10–11:30 a.m. Jan. 11 in Ohio State’s Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center in Columbus. There’s no charge to attend.

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Insect diversity in urban landscapes

CFAES’s Department of Entomology hosts talks by two of its graduate students starting at 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12: “Lady Beetles in the City: How Does Urban Habitat Management Affect the Abundance and Diversity of Native and Exotic Lady Beetles?” by Denisha Parker; and “The Impacts of Soil Legacy and Management on Biodiversity and Biocontrol Services in Urban Landscapes” by Emily Sypolt.

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Hello, friend; or, Froggy went a-helpin’

CFAES wildlife specialist Marne Titchenell presents “Common Frogs and Snakes of Ohio” from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in the Gwynne Conservation Area at Farm Science Review. It’s a look at your small, shy, helpful neighbors — American toads, green frogs, garter snakes and others — and the good they do for farms, yards and gardens. See the full Gwynne schedule. (Photo: Leopard frog, Getty Images.)

This bird must be a Buckeye

Birds are “incredibly important in the overall functioning of various ecosystems,” says EnvironmentalScience.org.

On Saturday, June 9, you can see birds functioning within the specific ecosystem of CFAES’s Secrest Arboretum. Members of the Greater Mohican Aududon Society will lead a guided bird walk there from 9-11 a.m. Admission is free. The arboretum is on CFAES’s Wooster campus.

Get details. (Photo: Scarlet (but not much gray) tanager, iStock.).

O! See 18 Christmas trees all grown up

Visit Secrest Arboretum and see 18 examples of big, tall, still-growing Christmas trees. Read more, get their GPS locations and see photos of all 18. (There’s a slideshow, too, of their needles close up.) The arboretum is on CFAES’s Wooster campus. (Photo: Eastern white pine, Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

Sssselebrities to follow on Twitter

Follow Skeate, Arwen, Hermione and Mr. Darcy, among others — radiotagged timber rattlesnakes living in southeast Ohio woods — on the @TimberTweets Twitter feed by CFAES’s Peterman Lab. Lab staff are tracking the secretive snakes, an Ohio endangered species, to see how forest management affects them. Venomous but shy, with a taste for eating small rodents (including ones spreading Lyme disease), timber rattlers help ecosystems and, quietly, people.

Lab head Bill Peterman, assistant professor in CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, says, “I’ve had a passion for amphibians and reptiles since I was a kid catching frogs and snakes.” He’s in the video above.