Peace, stability start in the soil

Republished from the Winter 2019–20 issue of CFAES’ Continuum magazine. Read the issue.

Even in the presence of royalty, the conversation was down to earth. And that was totally appropriate.

In a formal ceremony in April 2019 in Tokyo, CFAES soil scientist Rattan Lal received a 2019 Japan Prize, one of the most prestigious global awards in science and technology.

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‘We’re talking about transformational change’

“When it comes to adapting to the effects of climate change, scientists and policymakers are thinking too small.” So begins a Feb. 10 Ohio State News story about a research review by CFAES’ Robyn Wilson and colleagues. Read the story here.

Wilson, pictured, is a professor of risk analysis and decision science in CFAES’ School of Environment and Natural Resources. (Photo: SENR.)

Climate solutions? ‘The clock is ticking’

Ohio State’s free public Environmental Film Series continues tonight, Tuesday, Jan. 28, with Ice on Fire, Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2019 documentary sharing firsthand accounts of people at the forefront of the climate crisis—scientists, farmers, innovators, and others.

Find out more. Watch the trailer above.

Boost your veggie crops’ climate resilience

Following up on their morning session on “climate-smart” organic grains, CFAES researchers Rafiq Islam and Alan Sundermeier will present “Climate-Smart Organic Vegetables: Healthy Soils, Healthy Food, and Healthy People” from 2–3:30 p.m. Feb. 14 at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) annual conference.

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Let’s talk about farming and climate change

Science shows that our climate is changing, and CFAES’s Aaron Wilson will talk about what that means to farming, and how farmers in Ohio can adapt to the changes, at the upcoming annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA).

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How to grow grains despite climate change

How can farmers help their grain crops handle climate change? CFAES researchers Rafiq Islam and Alan Sundermeier will suggest practices at the upcoming annual conference of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA). Their workshop, “2020 Climate-Smart Organic Grains for Healthy Soils, Healthy Food, and Healthy People,” is set for 8:30–10 a.m. Feb. 14. 

The entire OEFFA conference, the largest ecological agriculture conference in Ohio, runs from Feb. 13–15 in Dayton.

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Carbon farming ‘a bridge to the future’?

Bloomberg reports that “Al Gore Is Opening a New Front In the War on Climate Change”—farming practices that sequester carbon dioxide in the soil—and CFAES’ own world expert on the subject, Rattan Lal, visited the former vice president’s farm in Tennessee to look at, walk upon, and talk about the possibilities. Excellent story by Emily Chasan, Bloomberg’s sustainable finance editor.

Lal directs CFAES’ Carbon Management and Sequestration Center. Earlier this year he was awarded the Japan Prize.

Lessons from Bangladesh on climate change

Bangladesh, a country of 165 million in southern Asia, can teach the world a lot about climate change—how everything from climate to food to migration to economics is intertwined. So says CFAES development economist Joyce Chen, featured in our latest CFAES Story.

Ohio’s farm crisis: Why leaving a field unplanted can hurt it

Some 1.5 million acres of Ohio’s farm fields—an area twice the size of Rhode Island—didn’t have any corn, soybeans, or other cash crops planted on them this year. Reason: Record spring rain made the ground too wet to plant. Now those fields are at risk of problems from something called fallow syndrome, which is caused by the loss of crop-friendly microbes that live—or lived—in the fields’ soils.

Experts from CFAES explain. (Photo: Getty Images.)