This bug stinks. Can science sustainably stop it?

CFAES scientist Celeste Welty is part of a 15-state study looking at sustainable ways to control the invasive, non-native, crop- and home-bugging brown marmorated stink bug, shown here. Specifically, she’s studying a tiny wasp that preys on the stinker. CFAES scientist Andy Michel, meanwhile, is evaluating the pest’s impact on Ohio’s $2.5 billion soybean crop. Details on their work. (Photo: Susan Ellis, Bugwood.org.)

New bioenergy, biological waste management program at Ohio State ATI

Starting fall semester, students at Ohio State ATI, CFAES’s two-year degree-granting unit in Wooster, will be able to study a new program focused on two key global issues: bioenergy and biological waste management.

Worth noting: National Geographic recently ranked water and wastewater treatment operator as the second-fastest-growing job in sustainability-related fields.

Check out Ohio State ATI’s website.

Let’s see what’s out there

NOAA has issued its first early season Lake Erie algal bloom bulletin. You can get weekly and, starting in July, twice-weekly updates on the Forecasting webpage of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. You also can sign up to get them by email. (Photo: Lake Erie on May 8, showing sediment plumes from the Maumee River and other tributaries, NOAA CoastWatch.)

‘It would be amazing to give people clean drinking water’

CFAES student Ashlee Balcerzak, who’s from Maumee near Toledo, was a pre-med major at first. Then she took a class at Ohio State’s Stone Lab on Lake Erie and everything changed.

“I got really interested in the actual overall water quality issues and the ecosystems,” she says, “so I ended up changing my major to environmental science.” Her specialty: water science.

Now, as an undergraduate researcher in the college, she’s studying the use of magnetic bacteria to remove algal bloom-causing phosphorus from waters such as Lake Erie. She’s even given a TEDx Toledo talk on it.

“I’m just so passionate about water science,” she says. “I want to help others.”

May 16 at Ohio State: 2 ways to turn your home greener

May’s monthly breakfast program by the Environmental Professionals Network will feature Erik Daugherty, founder of the Nashville, Tennessee-based home-performance company E3 Innovate. He’ll present “Technologies and Strategies for Home Energy Efficiencies: Satisfied Homeowners, Sustainable Planet” from 7:15 to 9:15 a.m. this coming Tuesday, May 16.

Right after, Ohio State will hold its second-ever Green Home Workshop in the same location.

Register for both events by Monday, May 15 (scroll down).

EPN is a service of CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources.

How to cut your home energy bill

CFAES and its partners are holding their second Green Home Workshop on May 16 in Columbus. The deadline to sign up is Monday, May 15.

Included will be tours of Ohio State’s student-designed and -built enCORE solar home, shown here, which is just a short walk from the workshop site. (Photo: Office of Energy and Environment, Ohio State.)

Earth Day service along river, in wetland

Props to the 60-plus volunteers who helped clean up the Olentangy River and CFAES’s Wilma H. Schiermeier Olentangy River Wetland Research Park as a day of service on Earth Day, April 22. Read more and see photos on the School of Environment and Natural Resources’ website. The school manages the wetland. (Photo: Ris Twigg via SENR.)

It’s good for your farm. It’s good for everyone’s water

If you live and farm in Ohio and apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres of land, you need to earn your agricultural fertilizer certification by Sept. 30 of this year. Learn more about the requirement here. See the training dates and locations here. The next training session is May 10 in Cortland in northeast Ohio.