Publications

Dietrich, M., & Ayers, J. C. (2022). Element transport and partitioning along tidal channels in Southwest Bangladesh. Estuaries and Coasts, 1-19.
Methods – Solids Sample Analysis

A total of 0.25–0.5 g of each filter paper + suspended sediment subsample was digested according to EPA Method 3051A at The Ohio State University Service Testing and Research Laboratory (STAR Lab) for analysis on an Agilent 5110 ICP-OES for the elements: Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Si, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn.

Sample Type: Soil Analysis Performed: 3051A and ICP Link

Griffiths, L. N., Haupt, T. N., Zhang, L., & Mitsch, W. J. (2021). Role of emergent and submerged vegetation and algal communities on nutrient retention and management in a subtropical urban stormwater treatment wetland. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 29(2), 245-264.
Materials and Methods – Primary productivity and nutrient cycling estimates in shallow‐water dominated by emergent vegetation

Samples were then ground so that the vegetation could pass through a 2 mm sieve and sent to The Ohio State University Service Testing and Research (STAR) lab for nutrient analysis. The STAR lab analyzed all macrophyte samples for a major suite of elements (including phosphorus) by performing a nitric/perchloric acid digestion and then using an Agilent 5110 ICP-OES for sample analysis. Nitrogen composition was determined by the STAR lab using a VARIO Max Cube Carbon-Nitrogen Analyzer. Biofilm was not removed from the macrophytes and, thus, nutrient concentrations include algal growth on the emergent vegetation sampled.

Sample Type: Plant Analysis Performed: Microwave Digestion, ICP, and Total Nitrogen Link

Sulliván, S. M. P., Bohenek, J. R., Cáceres, C., & Pomeroy, L. W. (2021). Multiple urban stressors drive fish-based ecological networks in streams of Columbus, Ohio, USA. Science of The Total Environment, 754, 141970.
2. Methods – 2.1. Field Data

Nutrient samples were collected coincident with fish samples at each study reach at 5–7 locations. Sub-samples from each reach were composited by reach and were refrigerated before submission to The Ohio State University’s Service Testing and Research (STAR) Laboratory for analysis of total nitrogen (N; mg L−1) and total phosphorus (P; mg L−1) within 24 h of collection. Total N and P were analyzed using flow injection analysis (Latchat Quick Chem 8500 Flow Injection Analyzer, Hach Company, Loveland, Colorado).

Sample Type: Water Analysis Performed: FIA – Total T + Total P Link

Hanrahan, B. R., King, K. W., & Williams, M. R. (2021). Controls on subsurface nitrate and dissolved reactive phosphorus losses from agricultural fields during precipitation-driven events. Science of the Total Environment, 754, 142047.
Methods – 2.2. Weather, field, soil, and management characteristics

Samples were then analyzed for pH, organic matter (as LOI), percent carbon (C), percent N, aluminum (Al3+), iron (Fe3+), sulfur (S2−), NO3−, and STP (as Mehlich III) using standard methods by the Service Testing and Research (STAR) Lab at The Ohio State University (Wooster, OH).

Sample Type: Soil Analysis Performed: pH, LOI, CN, Mehlich III Link

Boutin, K. D., Mitsch, W. J., Everham, E., Bakshi, B. R., & Zhang, L. (2021). An evaluation of corn production within a Wetlaculture™ system at Buckeye Lake, Ohio. Ecological Engineering, 171, 106366.
Methods – 2.4. Soil sampling and Analysis

Samples were air-dried indoors at room temperature, ground and passed through a Number 10 sieve. They were then packaged and shipped to the Service Testing and Research (STAR) Lab of The Ohio State University in Wooster, OH, for analyses.

To determine the soil fertility at planting and at harvest, samples were taken from each of the eight corn mesocosms and at the reference farm. Samples were taken at the time of planting (May 5, 2020 for reference farm, June 6, 2020 for mesocosms) and at harvest (Sept. 25, 2020 for mesocosms, Oct. 7, 2020 for reference farm). Plant-available P and K were determined via Mehlich 3 analysis (Mehlich, 1984), while NH4 and NO3 were determined via 2 m KCl extraction (Mulvaney, 1996). The mass of elemental nitrogen available to plants was then estimated by multiplying the NH4 values for each sample by (14/18) and the NO3 values by (14/62), then summing the results. Critical Mehlich 3 concentrations for corn agriculture were found in the literature to serve as a benchmark by which to evaluate sample test results.

Sample Type: Soil Analysis Performed: KCl, Mehlich III Link

Baumgardner, J. L., Bauerle, W. L., & Eilertson, K. (2021). Estimating optimal daily nitrate, potassium, and water requirements of Cannabis sativa ‘cherry wine’ during the vegetative phase. Journal of Plant Nutrition, 44(11), 1587-1597.
2. Materials and methods – Nutrient Analysis

NO3− or K+ ISEs, commonly used in laboratories and hospitals to measure NO3− or K+, were used to quantify the ppm of NO3− or K+ in the leachate. Nutrient Recipe base input samples and leachate output after uptake were cross-referenced once via the Service Testing and Research lab at Ohio State University and found to match up with calculated recipe input quantities and ISE quantified values (data not shown).

Sample Type: Liquid Analysis Performed: FIA Link

Weston, L. M., Mattingly, K. Z., Day, C. T., & Hovick, S. M. (2021). Potential local adaptation in populations of invasive reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) across an urbanization gradient. Ecology and Evolution, 11(16), 11457-11476.
2 Methods – 2.1 Source population selection and sampling

We collected six mineral soil cores (15 cm deep × 2 cm diameter) from each site and combined them at the site level to create a composite sample for analysis of metal and micronutrient concentrations via nitric acid digestion (conducted by The Ohio State University’s Service Testing and Research Laboratory). Metal and micronutrient information from the composite soil sample provides a snapshot of contaminant levels at one timepoint but does not provide information about temporal or spatial variability of contaminants (Carter & Gregorich, 2008).

Sample Type: Soil Analysis Performed: Microwave Digestion, ICP Link

Menevseoglu, A., & Cabaroglu, T. (2021). Evaluating the chemical and metal contamination of commercial Rakı, a grape-based alcoholic beverage from Turkey. OENO One, 55(3), 261-271.
2 Methods – 2.3 Copper, arsenic, lead and zinc analysis by ICP-OES

Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) analysis were conducted at Service Testing and Research Laboratory (STAR Lab) at the Ohio State University Wooster campus (Wooster, OH). Agilent 5110 ICP-OES Dual view model (Agilent Corp., Santa Clara, CA, USA) was used to determine metal contaminants in Rakı samples. The metals were quantified using the calibration models for each metal at a wavelength of 228 nm (As), 324 nm (Cu), 220 nm (Pb) and 206 nm (Zn), following a method modified from Budzynska et al. (2018).

Sample Type: Liquid Analysis Performed: ICP Link

Weidenhamer, J. D., Chasant, M., & Gottesfeld, P. (2022). Metal exposures from source materials for artisanal aluminum cookware. International Journal of Environmental Health Research, 1-12.
2. Methodology – 2.5 Analysis of leaching solutions and palm oil digests

Leaching solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Palm oil digestions and all leaching solution ICP measurements were conducted by the Service Testing and Research Laboratory (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center – Ohio State University) on an Agilent 5110 ICP spectrometer (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). Instrument detection limits for all elements are noted in footnotes to the data tables. Blanks and spiked acetic acid samples were used to verify analytical performance. Recovery of lead from spiked acetic acid samples was 104.4% of the expected value. Stability of acetic acid extraction solutions during storage was confirmed by reanalysis of solutions and no differences were observed.

Sample Type: Liquid Analysis Performed: ICP Link

Yang, T., Samarakoon, U., Altland, J., & Ling, P. (2021). Photosynthesis, biomass production, nutritional quality, and flavor-related phytochemical properties of hydroponic-grown arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) ‘standard’ under different electrical conductivities of nutrient solution. Agronomy, 11(7), 1340.
2. Materials and Methods – 2.6. Measurement of Tissue Nutrient Analysis

Plant tissue nutrient analysis was conducted using samples of the shoot of ‘Standard’ arugula (6 plants per treatment) at Ohio State University’s Service, Testing, and Research (STAR) laboratory (Wooster, OH, USA) to investigate the variations in nutrient uptake under different EC levels. Total concentrations of plant-essential elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Al, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, and Zn) were determined by microwave digestion with HNO3 followed by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometry according to Jones [28]. Nitrate nitrogen in plant tissue samples were determined by the NO3-N cadmium reduction method [29]. Total nitrogen in plant tissue samples were determined by the Dumas method according to Association of Official Analytical Chemists [30].

Sample Type: Plant Analysis Performed: Microwave Digestion, ICP, CN Link

Dietrich, M., & Ayers, J. (2021). Geochemical partitioning and possible heavy metal (loid) bioaccumulation within aquaculture shrimp ponds. Science of The Total Environment, 788, 147777.
2.4. Analyses

All ashed shrimp and fish feed samples were analyzed at the Ohio State University STAR Lab for the elements: Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, and Sb on the ICP-OES. Results for As, Be, Cd, and Co were omitted because all values were below method detection limit (MDL). 0.4–0.5 g. subsamples of shrimp/fish feed ash were dissolved in 15 mL HNO3, and then samples were filtered at 0.45 μm and diluted 10-fold before running on an Agilent 5110 ICP-OES.

Sample Type: Plant and Animal Analysis Performed: Ash, ICP Link

Sullivan, S. M. P., Corra, J. W., & Hayes, J. T. (2021). Urbanization mediates the effects of water quality and climate on a model aerial insectivorous bird. Ecological Monographs, 91(2), e01442.
Climate, chemical water quality, and nutrients

All water-quality measurements were made concurrently at each site between ~08:00 and 12:00. These samples were then sent to The Ohio State University’s Service Testing and Research Laboratory (Wooster, Ohio, USA) for analysis of total phosphorus (P; mg/L), total nitrogen (N; mg/L), phosphate (PO4; mg/L), nitrate (NO3; mg/L), ammonia (NH3; mg/L), total dissolved solids (TDS; mg/L), and total Hg (ppt).

Sample Type: Water Analysis Performed: FIA, TDS Link

Corra, J., & Sullivan, S. M. P. (2021). Temperature and land use influence tree swallow individual health. Conservation physiology, 9(1), coab084.
Water Chemistry

A suite of chemical water-quality variables associated with urbanization in the stream channel (Meyer et al., 2005; Walsh et al., 2005; Vietz et al., 2016) were selected and measured at each study site twice annually (mid-late May and mid-late July, 2014–2018). Nine 250-mg water samples were collected at each study site, one sample each at both stream edges and the thalweg at the upstream, middle and downstream sections each reach. These samples were sent to The Ohio State University’s Service Testing and Research Laboratory (Wooster, OH, USA) for analysis of mercury (Hg; ppt), phosphate (mg l-1), nitrate (mg l-1), ammonia (mg l-1), total phosphorus (mg l-1) and total nitrogen (mg l-1).

Sample Type: Water Analysis Performed: FIA Link

Weidenhamer, J. D., Fitzpatrick, M. P., Biro, A. M., Kobunski, P. A., Hudson, M. R., Corbin, R. W., & Gottesfeld, P. (2017). Metal exposures from aluminum cookware: An unrecognized public health risk in developing countries. Science of The Total Environment, 579, 805–813. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.023 
Pg. 807 – 2.6. ICP methods 

Leaching solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry(ICP). ICP measurements were carried out by the Service Testing and Research Laboratory (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center –Ohio State. University) on a Prodigy Dual View ICP spectrometer (Teledyne Leeman Labs, Hudson, NH, USA). Blanks and spiked samples were used to verify analytical performance. In addition, stability of extraction solutions during storage was confirmed by reanalysis of solutions and no differences were observed. 

Sample Type: Leaching Solution  Analysis Performed: ICP  Link 

 

Walia, M. K., & Dick, W. A. (2016). Soil chemistry and nutrient concentrations in perennial ryegrass as influenced by gypsum and carbon amendments. Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 0–0. doi: 10.4067/s0718-95162016005000059 
2. Material and Methods – 2. 1. Experimental setup 

Each soil was screened through a 2-mm sieve and then mixed thoroughly before selected soil properties were measured (Table 1). Soil pH was measured using a 1:1 ratio of soil to deionized water (Watson and Brown, 1998), soil texture by the hydrometer method (Day, 1965), total C and N using high temperature combustion (Nelson and Sommers, 1996), Bray P-1 by the method of Frank et al. (1998), and exchangeable bases (Ca, K, and Mg) by extraction with 1 M NH4OAC (Warncke and Brown, 1998).The materials applied as soil treatments were crop (corn) residues, gypsum, and glucose. Corn residues were collected from the field and dried in an oven at 60 °C before being ground to pass a 2 mm mesh sieve. Glucose and gypsum were obtained. 

Sample Type: Soil and Plant  Analysis Performed: pH, Total Carbon and Nitrogen, Bray P-1, NH4OAC, CEC, Microwave Digestion and ICP  Link 

 

Morris, D., Kim, S., Kononoff, P., & Lee, C. (2018). Continuous 11-week feeding of reduced-fat distillers grains with and without monensin reduces lactation performance of dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science, 101(7), 5971–5983. doi: 10.3168/jds.2017-14170 
Pg. 5973 – Materials and Methods – Measurements, Sampling, and Laboratory Analyses 

Feeds were also analyzed for minerals by Service Testing and Research Laboratory (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster) using inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (Isaac and Johnson, 1985) after microwave digestion with nitric acid (Jones et al., 1991). 

Sample Type: Plant  Analysis Performed: Microwave digestion and ICP  Link 

 

Kermack, J. P., & Rauschert, E. S. J. (2019). Soil characteristics drive Ficaria verna abundance and reproductive output. Invasive Plant Science and Management, 12(4), 214–222. doi: 10.1017/inp.2019.27 
Site Characteristics 

Distance from the river, PAR, soil characteristics (pH, percent moisture, and nutrient analysis), slope, and aspect were recorded at each site. PAR measurements were taken in late April during the peak growing season (Apogee Instruments, Logan, UT), as close to noon as possible on a cloudless day. In April 2016, two 15-cm soil cores were also taken from each quadrat; soil moisture content was measured for each sample in the lab. Soil texture (particle-size analysis) was also investigated using the hydrometer method (Gee and Bauder 1979). Nutrient analyses involving phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, CEC, pH, lime test index (a measure of reserve acidity), and total nitrogen were performed by the STAR laboratory at the Ohio State University. Due to additional costs associated with testing, nitrate nitrogen levels were only assessed for every other quadrat along the transect. 

Sample Type: Soil  Analysis Performed: CEC, pH, Total N, Bray-P1, Ammonium Acetate-Extractable K, Ca, and Mg  Link 

 

 

Fulford, A. M., & Culman, S. W. (2018). Over-Fertilization Does Not Build Soil Test Phosphorus and Potassium in Ohio. Agronomy Journal, 110(1), 56–65. doi: 10.2134/agronj2016.12.0701 
Materials and Methods 

Soil samples were collected from the surface 20 cm of all plots in the fall following crop harvest but prior to broadcast and chisel tillage incorporation of any P and K fertilizer. Seven to 10, 2.5-cm diam. soil cores were sampled between planted rows, composited, air-dried, and sieved (<2 mm). The Service Testing and Research Laboratory at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (Wooster, OH) conducted soil test P (Bray-P1; Frank et al., 1998), soil pH (Thomas, 1996), cation exchange capacity (CEC), and ammonium acetate-extractable K, Ca, and Mg (Warncke and Brown, 1998) every year except when soils were not sampled in 2007 and 2009 (Wood County), 2007 (Clark County), and 2011 (all three county sites). Table 1 provides the initial soil characterization for each site. 

Sample Type: Soil  Analysis Performed: CEC, pH, Total N, Bray-P1, Ammonium Acetate-Extractable K, Ca, and Mg  Link 

 

Welch, B. A., Davis, C. B., & Gates, R. J. (2006). Dominant environmental factors in wetland plant communities invaded by Phragmites australis in East Harbor, Ohio, USA. Wetlands Ecology and Management, 14(6), 511–525. doi: 10.1007/s11273-006-9004-8 
Pg. 514 – Soil Samples 

Another subsample was sent to Ohio State University’s Service, Testing, and Research Laboratory for standard analyses, including pH, available Bray (no.1) phosphorus, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Soil moisture also was calculated for each sample. 

 

Sample Type: Soil 

Analysis Performed: CEC, pH, Total N, Bray-P1, Ammonium Acetate-Extractable K, Ca, and Mg, and Soil Moisture   

Link 

 

Xu, J., Mancl, K. M., & Tuovinen, O. H. (2013). Using Tall Fescue to Remove Nutrients from Renovated Turkey Processing Wastewater. 2013 Kansas City, Missouri, July 21 – July 24, 2013. doi: 10.13031/aim.20131583354 
Pg. 16 – Grass Sampling and Analytical Procedures 

Plant samples were analyzed by the OARDC Service Testing and Research Lab at the Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio. Total concentrations of major elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Al, B, Cu, 17 Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, and Zn) of plant materials were determined with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Emission Spectrometry after digestion with HNO3 according to Baker and Smith (1969). NO3 –N of plant materials was determined by potentiometric method according to Isaac and Johnson (1985). 

Sample Type: Plant  Analysis Performed: Microwave Digestion, ICP, and Nitrate  Link 

 

Kautza, A., & Sullivan, S. M. P. (2015). Shifts in reciprocal river-riparian arthropod fluxes along an urban-rural landscape gradient. Freshwater Biology, 60(10), 2156–2168. doi: 10.1111/fwb.12642 
Pg. 2159 – Field and laboratory methods 

To account for influences of nutrient concentration on emergent insect production, we collected six 250-mL water samples for total nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) measurements from each reach: three samples collected laterally across the channel at evenly spaced intervals at the upstream and three at the downstream end of each reach (six samples total). Samples were collected once during the mid-point of the study at low flow (late July 2012). 

Sample Type: Water  Analysis Performed: Total Nitrogen and Phosphorus  Link 

 

 

Cheng, C.-M., Amaya, M., Butalia, T., Baker, R., Walker, H. W., Massey-Norton, J., & Wolfe, W. (2016). Short-term influence of coal mine reclamation using coal combustion residues on groundwater quality. Science of The Total Environment, 571, 834–854. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.07.061 
During each sampling event, field duplicate and trip blanks were used as part of the quality control procedure. The duplicate samples were taken from a well randomly selected to avoid bias. Field duplicate samples were collected simultaneously with the primary samples and analyzed for all constituents analyzed in the primary samples. The trip blank containers were filled with analyte-free deionized water in the lab, taken to the site, and handled along with field samples. All sample analysis were carried out by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s Service Testing and Research Lab at The Ohio State University. The analytical methods and instruments used for the chemical analysis are listed in Table 3. Also included in the table are the instrument detection limits of monitored constituent 
Sample Type: Water  Analysis Performed: pH, Conductivity, Alkalinity, Total Dissolved Solids, IC, ICP, Hg  Link 

 

Grayson, J., & Dabrowski, K. (2020). Partial and total replacement of fish oil with fatty acid ethyl esters in the starter diets of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Aquaculture, 522, 735018. doi: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735018 
2.3. Proximate and fatty acid analysis 

Proximate analysis was carried out on experimental diets and on fish whole bodies after 62 days of feeding. Prior to analysis, whole body fish (5/tank) were dehydrated via freeze-drying (<200 mT, −4 °C for 48 h). The difference in sample weight before and after drying were used to calculate moisture content using the following equation; percent moisture content = ((initial weight –final weight) * 100)/ initial weight. After drying, fish samples were manually ground, and protein and ash analysis was performed on dry ground samples following standard procedures (AOAC, 2002). 

Acknowledgements 

Proximate analysis of experimental diets and fish bodies was carried out in coordination with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center Service Testing and Research Lab 

Sample Type: Dried Fish  Analysis Performed: Ash  Link 

 

Sivakoff, F. S., & Gardiner, M. M. (2017). Soil lead contamination decreases bee visit duration at sunflowers. Urban Ecosystems, 20(6), 1221–1228. doi: 10.1007/s11252-017-0674-1 
Pg. 1222 – Methods – Soil amendment and plant growth 

We germinated sunflowers variety ‘Dwarf Sunspot’ individually in thoroughly wetted, peat-based growing medium and transplanted seedlings once they produced their first pair of true leaves into pots containing either contaminated or control soil. Transplanted seedlings (14–19 day post germination) in their respective soil contamination treatments were randomly assigned a location in the greenhouse maintained at 22/ 20 °C, 16/8 h day/night. Plants were watered daily to maintain approximately 35% water holding capacity and were fertilized once during this growing period at a rate of 150 ppm (Peters Professional 20–10-20 General Purpose, Everris). Dwarf Sunspot sunflowers generally produce a single flower head, and once this flower head formed but before it opened, we covered the flower head with a tightly woven mesh bag (1 gal paint strainer) to exclude access to the flower head by pollinators and other insects in the greenhouse. We measured plant height at 49 days after planting (5 days before the start of the field experiment). Soil from plants not used in the field experiments (n = 8 per soil contamination treatment) was air dried and analyzed for Pb by the Service Testing and Research Lab at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. 

Sample Type: Soil  Analysis Performed: Pb  Link