Ohio State Researchers Find Road Design Changes Can Reduce Distracted Driving Crashes

Columbus, Ohio (Nov. 19, 2018) – While efforts to combat distracted driving have primarily focused on passing new laws and changing driver behaviors, a new study from The Ohio State University’s Risk Institute reveals the important impact that modifying road design can have on reducing the frequency and severity of distracted driving crashes.

Researchers Zhenhua Chen and Youngbin Lym, assistant professor and his PhD student, in city and regional planning at The Ohio State University, found a 35 percent increase in distracted driver fatalities in Ohio and a 23 percent increase in serious injuries for the period 2003-2013. Additionally, distracted driving crashes were more severe in some road environments, such as work zones where they were up to two times more likely to be fatal.

This research found that urbanized areas such as Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati had much higher risk in vehicle crashes than other regions in Ohio. Even the length of a roadway segment or number of lanes had an impact on the frequency of distracted driving crashes. On the other hand, roundabouts had a significant effect on reducing the severity of distracted driving-related crashes. Other road environments that have a median or a shoulder with an asphalt pavement were also found to have fewer distracted driving crashes.

“This study helps to highlight that there is a need to improve traffic safety and road management,” said Phil Renaud, executive director of The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business. “It provides new evidence that supports taking steps to improve traffic signs and safety regulations for distracted driving in specific areas. There are things we can do on a local, city level to lower crash frequencies and severities.”

Key findings also include:

  • Distracted driving-related crashes account for approximately 18 percent of overall Ohio crash fatalities and 16 percent of Ohio serious injuries.
  • Distracted driving-related crashes are up to 49 percent more severe when they occur on a highway system.
  • The risk of vehicle crashes due to distracted driving is found to be highest in the Columbus area.
  • Distracted driving crashes are 5-10 times more likely to be fatal than severe in a rear end and or angle crash.
  • Roundabouts were found to be the single most effective road design in reducing the rate of crashes and crash severity. Overall, within the data (2013-2017) there were no fatal crashes within roundabouts.

The increase in distracted driving-related crashes in Ohio has become a major concern to various stakeholders, including insurance companies, transportation planners and policymakers. To help address this problem, which is so costly in terms of lives, medical bills, car repairs and insurance costs, the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America (PCI) funded The Risk Institute’s study and is working to raise awareness about the dangers of distracted driving.

“Those of us in the insurance industry hear far too many stories of how families are devastated because someone was texting behind the wheel,” said Bob Passmore, assistant vice president for PCI. “This research confirms some of the trends we have seen in auto insurance claims. Congested, urban roadways, infrastructure challenges along with the ubiquitous use of electronic devices combine to create hazardous driving conditions. As we have seen with other motor safety issues such as seatbelt use and drunk driving, there is no single answer to addressing the problem of distracted driving. It takes a coordinated strategy combining the enactment of laws, strong enforcement, drivers taking personal responsibility to avoid distractions and improvements in transportation infrastructure design.”

About the Risk Institute

The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business is a collection of forward-thinking companies and academics that provide effective risk management strategies to not only protect firms, but position firms to create growth and value. The Risk Institute helps members consider risk from all perspectives: legal, operational, strategic, reputational, talent, financial and many more. The Risk Institute operates at a unique intersection between faculty, students and professionals from a broad cross-section of industries. With a leading-edge approach to risk management, The Risk Institute creates a unique exchange for risk-centered conversations, ideas and strategies that can’t happen anywhere else.

About PCI
PCI promotes and protects the viability of a competitive private insurance market for the benefit of consumers and insurers. PCI is composed of approximately 1,000 member companies and 340 insurance groups, representing the broadest cross section of home, auto, and business insurers of any national trade association. PCI members represent all sizes, structures, and regions, which protect families, communities, and businesses in the U.S. and across the globe. PCI members write $245 billion in annual premium, which is 38 percent of the nation’s property casualty insurance marketplace.

The Risk Institute Releases Fourth Annual Survey on Integrated Risk Management

Data Reveals Risk Management Funding Growing, Opportunity to Improve Corporate Objectives

Columbus, Ohio – Today The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business, a leading risk-management research organization, reveals its Fourth Annual Survey on Integrated Risk Management. The report surveyed more than 500 financial, nonfinancial, public and private firms to understand how U.S. companies view the role of risk management, the influence of governance and culture and how risk impacts business decisions.

The data reveals 70% of firms have an integrated risk management unit and companies are
increasing funding for risk management, but the size of those units continues to decrease. Despite recognizing the need to invest in risk, firms are not investing in people. Among the other 2018 findings:

  • 60% of risk managers believe that artificial intelligence will play a role in risk management in the future.
  • 28% of firms surveyed have been victims of a cyber attack – a risk that continues to grow each year.
  • 55% of respondents do not use predictive analytics, and those that do have been using them for less than two years.
  • 44% expect to outsource some or all of their risk function.

Risk management policies play an increasingly critical role in a firm’s ability to create value and remain competitive. Both financial firms and nonfinancial firms reported that when they integrate risk management into business processes, they are able to improve corporate objectives.

“One of our key objectives at The Risk Institute is to create a greater understanding of how organizations can proactively leverage risk management to create shareholder value,” said Phil Renaud, Executive Director of the Risk Institute. “Volatility in the current economic and political environment, as well as cyber risk becoming a real threat to many firms, lead to a more vulnerable business environment, making the role of risk management more integral.”

To learn more about the Risk Institute and its Fourth Annual Survey on Integrated Risk Management, please visit: http://go.osu.edu/risksurvey

About the Risk Institute

The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business is a collection of forward-thinking companies and academics that provide effective risk management strategies to not only protect firms, but position firms to create growth and value. The Risk Institute helps members consider risk from all perspectives: legal, operational, strategic, reputational, talent, financial and many more. The Risk Institute operates at a unique intersection between faculty, students and professionals from a broad cross-section of industries. With a leading-edge approach to risk management, The Risk Institute creates a unique exchange for risk-centered conversations, ideas and strategies that can’t happen anywhere else.

 

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The Risk Implications of Smart Technology

Artificial intelligence, drones, and the internet of Things are some of the most exciting developments happening in the tech world, but with these advancements come new and unforeseen risks for companies, governments and private citizens.

Last week, The Risk Institute hosted a continuing professional development session on the risk implications of smart technologies with experts from DHL, Cisco, EY and The Ohio State University.

“Ten years ago, people thought of drones as something used by the military on covert operations. Today, drones are available for a couple bucks and can fit in your pocket,” said Jim Gregory, Director of the Aerospace Research Center at The Ohio State University.

Gregory believes that the possibilities of drones are far-reaching, from package delivery to search and rescue, but that in order for the economics to work themselves out, the legality of drones needs to shift because under the current FAA regulations, most of these use cases are still illegal.

The most significant risks involving drones are

  • Loss of control link
  • Collision with another aircraft
  • Collision with people or property on the ground
  • Emergent behavior of autonomous system

Many of those risks can be mitigated with “redundancies on redundancies,” which according to Gregory can take the form of robust control links and never allowing one system to become so important that its failure results in catastrophic failure of the entire system. These redundancies are also essential in artificial intelligence.

“Artificial intelligence is not a singular concept,” said Chris Aiken, Executive Director, Advisory Services. “It’s a science-based, multi-disciplinary combination of software and computations presented in a human-like manner.”

Just as the cotton-gin spurred on the first industrial revolution, many experts believe that artificial intelligence will fundamentally shift the workforce, but are also quick to point out that AI is not necessarily smarter that humans, it’s just different.

“The real power of AI is to augment and amplify human intelligence and performance,” said Aiken.

And world leaders are taking notice with the competition between countries like China, Russia, Canada and the United States heating up for a global arms-race to dominate AI.

But what value is there in artificial intelligence really? According to Aiken, the real value of AI exists in five areas:

  1. Revealing insights
  2. Optimize performance
  3. Harness automation
  4. Enhance experience
  5. Sustain trust

As with any disruptive technology, it’s valuable to consider the predominant ethical, legal, risk and social issues associated with it. In the case of AI, companies should:

  • Start any project by examining the ethical and legal impacts
  • Evaluate the consequences on jobs
  • Communicate to win employee approval

Building trust between the user/impacted parties and AI is imperative for the success of the technology and business. Taking a holistic, human-centered approach, focusing on outcomes, and being pragmatic and ethical are common sense steps to take in order to build trust.

The Risk Institute remains committed to leading the conversation on risk in partnership with our member organizations. We examined the risk impacts of artificial intelligence in the risk function in our 2018 Survey on Integrated Risk Management. The findings might surprise you.

 

 

Impacts of Protectionism on Global Trade

Join us for the next Risk Series session on February 21, 2018, as we discuss how demographics drive the economy and the risks and impacts your business faces as a result. Register today!

Last week, it was announced that President Trump has placed steep tariffs on solar energy cells and washing machines. These tariffs largely targeted Asian manufacturers like Samsung and LG and represent the first step towards the sort of economic protectionist policies that were the hallmark of his 2016 campaign.

Protectionist trade policies have been in place for decades, but they’re once again coming to the forefront of political discourse as a result of populist movements at home and abroad.

As part of the Risk Institute’s commitment to leading the conversation on risk and risk management, we hosted our first continuing professional development session of 2018 on the impacts of protectionism on global trade.

Speakers included Sarah Brooks, Professor at Ohio State University; Jose Souto from Cargill; and Prentice Wells from EY.

According to Sarah Brooks, Professor of Political Science at The Ohio State University, since the 2016 election, international political economy has hit home in the US reflected through increased populist sentiment, economic nationalism, and discontent with free trade agreements. Dr. Brooks was quick to point out that the US has long championed free and open trade while actually maintaining a protectionist economy.

Each speaker also touched on the “China Shock,” which took place from 1991-2012 when China’s share of world manufacturing value added grew from 4.1% to 24%. Of the 100 counties hit hardest by the China shock, Trump won 89.

Jose Souto from Cargill explained that protectionism can take many forms: tariffs, quotas, subsidies, exchange rate manipulation and others. Protectionist policies exist in theory to protect infant, recuperating, and declining industries; to protect basic and strategic industries; and to deter unfair trade practices. The efficacy of those policies depends on a myriad of factors, but nearly every nation in the world employees at least some protectionist economic strategies.

Risky Business

7 common reasons given for a merger

Mergers and acquisitions are likely to be the biggest capital investment for a firm. For the acquired, stock prices typically rise significantly, but for the buyer, they typically fall. So what are the main reasons given for a merger or acquisition? In a recent Risk Series session hosted by The Risk Institute, Isil Erel discussed these and more during her talk.

Continue reading

Introducing the SCRAM™ Tool

The Risk Institute is excited to announce SCRAM™, a supply chain resilience assessment and management tool, developed by researchers at The Ohio State in collaboration with the U.S. Air force, Dow Chemical, L Brands and a number of other companies.

Businesses Need Resilience
In an age of global turbulence, resilience is a key competency for corporations. How can a company improve the resilience of its supply chain processes, so that it can recover rapidly from unexpected disruptions, assure business continuity and adapt effectively to changing external conditions?

The Solution
SCRAM™ is a facilitated process, supported by a computer-based toolkit, that provides a diagnostic assessment of an organization’s preparedness and fitness for coping with turbulent change. The process identifies resilience gaps and then suggests enhancements that will strengthen the company’s capacity to survive, adapt, and flourish—even when surprises occur.

What Can SCRAM™ Do For You?
SCRAM™ offers businesses a unique, comprehensive approach to understand the pattern of their potential vulnerabilities and to design a portfolio of supply chain capabilities that will offset those vulnerabilities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about SCRAM™, please contact us at The Risk Institute.

 

Unprecedented volatility adds new urgency and complexity to old risks, reports Aon’s 2017 Global Risk Management Survey

Aon, a founding member of The Risk Institute, released their 2017 Global Risk Management Survey today. Conducted in the fourth quarter of 2016, the bi-annual survey gathered input from 1,843 respondents at public and private companies around the world. It finds that trends in economics, demographics and geopolitics, as well as technology advancements, are transforming traditional risks and adding new urgency and complexity to old challenges.

Top discussion points of the survey include:

  • damage to reputation/brand as a top concern
  • political risk/uncertainties entering the top 10 risk list
  • Cyber Crime ranking the number one risk to North American businesses
  • disruptive technologies/innovation predicted to rise in risk
  • risk preparedness at its lowest level since 2007

Damage to reputation/brand is consistently the top-ranked risk by businesses. Companies have become vulnerable due to the amplified negative impact social media has on cases of defective products, fraudulent business practices, and corruption.

Cyber Crime is now the top concern among businesses in North America, jumping from number nine to number five on the top risk list. Cyber breaches are increasing and incident response plans have become more complex, making Cyber Crime a costly business interruption.

Political risk/uncertainties have recently re-entered the top 10 risk list at number nine. The survey finds that developed nations that were traditionally associated with political stability are becoming new sources of volatility and uncertainty. Additionally, according to Aon’s latest 2017 Risk Maps, trade protectionism is on the rise while terrorism and political violence ratings are the highest they have been since 2013.

“We are living in a challenging new reality for companies of all sizes around the world. There are many emerging influences that are creating opportunity, but at the same time, creating risks that need to be managed,” said Rory Moloney, chief executive officer for Aon Global Risk Consulting. “As the risk landscape for commerce evolves, businesses can no longer rely solely on traditional risk mitigation or risk transfer tactics. They must take a cross-functional approach to risk management and explore different ways to cope with these new complexities.”

Disruptive technologies/innovation is a concerning risk emerging for the future. It is currently ranked number twenty but is expected to jump to the top ten within a few years. New technologies such as drones, driverless cars, and advanced robotics have caused an increased awareness of impacts for businesses.

The top 10 risks are:

  1. Damage to reputation/brand
  2. Economic slowdown/slow recovery
  3. Increasing competition
  4. Regulatory/legislative changes
  5. Cyber crime/hacking/viruses/malicious codes
  6. Failure to innovate/meet customer needs
  7. Failure to attract or retain top talent
  8. Business interruption
  9. Political risk/uncertainties
  10. Third party liability (including E&O)

The full report can be accessed at www.aon.com/2017GlobalRisk.

 

Post Executive Education Series, “Identify, Plan, Protect: Using Cyber to Your Advantage”

On April 19,2017,  The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University, Fisher College of Business held an engaging conversation, as part of its Executive Education series, on the topic, “identify, Plan Protect: Using Cyber to your Advantage”.

As we see on an almost daily basis, Cyber Risk and Crime has become a part of our lives. During the first few weeks of 2017, we witnessed a large restaurant chain’s register payment systems impacted and a large business services firm’s marketing database with over 33 million corporate contacts shared across the web. Without much difficulty multiple other examples are found that cross any number of industries.

We were fortunate to have had Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine introduce the topic to our audience of executives. AG DeWine is passionate about Cyber Crime and Cyber Risk and its impact upon the citizens of Ohio.

The session focused on raising the conversation of the obvious current situation with regard to Cyber Risk and Crime, but also considered risk mitigants that businesses can take.  The speed at which crisis communication and Public Relations plans are treated and managed are certainly at the forefront of dealing with Cyber challenges within business.  So much so, that the phrase “Fiasco Vortex” has been coined (see Glass Jaw by Eric Dezenhall). In the 21st Century, communication never sleeps. We live in a 24/7 news cycle that demands a much different treatment to Cyber Risk and Cyber business continuity planning.

An organizations business continuity plans will need to be tested to respond to geographic specific exposure that could have wider impact upon the business and it customers. Our speakers highlighted, from their diverse experiences and backgrounds, how companies can take a proactive approach to Cyber Risk and Crime.

Session leaders, Helen Patton, CISO, The Ohio State University; Jim Trainor, SVP, Aon Cyber Solutions and former FBI head of the FBI Cyber Division, Washington, DC; David White, CIO, Battelle Memorial Institute; David Lyon, Senior Manager, The Crumpton Group, LLC, collaborated to provide insight into:

  • Cyber a View from the CISO Trench
  • Cyber Threat Landscape 2017 and Beyond
  • Cyber Security’s Impact on IT Operations
  • The Role of Intelligence in Cyber Attacks: Offense vs. Defense

The session emphasized how to proactively use risk management to balance the risks related to Cyber Risk in order to meet business goals and enhance business performance.

The session did an excellent job of creating thought provoking ideas and advancing The Risk Institute’s unique role in uniting industry thought leaders, academics and highly respected practitioners. This is an ongoing dialog to advance the understanding and evolution of risk management in our world today. The Risk Institute’s conversation about risk management is open and collaborative with its relevance across all industries and its potential for competitiveness and growth.

Identify, Plan, Protect: Using Cyber to Your Advantage

On April 19,2017, The Risk Institute at The Ohio State University, Fisher School of Business will be presenting as part of its 2017 Executive Education series, the topic “identify, Plan Protect: Using Cyber to your Advantage”.

As we see, almost on a daily basis, Cyber Risk and Crime have become part of our lives. During the first few weeks of 2017, we have seen a large restaurant chain’s register payment systems impacted and a large business services firm’s marketing database with over 33 million corporate contacts shared across the web. Without difficulty, multiple other examples are found that cross any number of industries.

We are fortunate to have Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine introduce the topic to our audience. AG DeWine is passionate about Cyber Crime and Cyber Risk and its impact on the citizens of Ohio.

The session will look to raise conversation on the obvious current situation with regard to Cyber Risk and Crime, and will consider risk mitigants that businesses can take. The speed at which crisis communication and Public Relations plans are treated and managed are certainly at the forefront of dealing with Cyber challenges within business. So much so, that the phrase “Fiasco Vortex” has been coined (see Glass Jaw by Eric Dezenhall). In the 21st Century, communication never sleeps. We live in a 24/7 news cycle that demands a much different treatment to Cyber Risk and Cyber business continuity planning.

An organization’s business continuity plans will need to be tested to respond to geographic specific exposure that could have a wider impact upon the business and it customers. Our speakers will highlight, from their diverse experience and background, how companies can take a proactive approach.

Session leaders, Helen Patton CISO, The Ohio State University; Jim Trainor SVP Aon Cyber Solutions and former FBI head of the FBI Cyber Division, Washington, DC; David White CIO Battelle Memorial Institute; and David Lyon, Senior Manager Crumpton Group, LLC will collaborate to provide insight into:

  • Cyber a View from the CISO Trench
  • Cyber Threat Landscape 2017 and Beyond
  • Cyber Security’s Impact on IT Operations
  • The Role of Intelligence in Cyber Attacks: Offense vs. Defense

The session will emphasize how to proactively use risk management to balance the risks related to Cyber Risk in order to meet business goals and enhance business performance.

The session will provide thought provoking ideas advancing The Risk Institute’s unique role in uniting industry thought leaders, academics and highly respected practitioners in an ongoing dialog to advance the understanding and evolution of risk management. The Risk Institute’s conversation about risk management is open and collaborative with its relevance across all industries and its potential for competitiveness and growth.

The Art of Balancing Your Eggs Between Baskets

Strategizing your portfolio of real options for the win.

What factors make your real options portfolio valuable? How do you analyze the nature of the interactions among real options and their effects on portfolio value? Ultimately, how can your firm be most strategic in managing this in your industry’s unique market?

To begin, firms must consider growth and switching options in developing a portfolio of strategic options. Growth and switching options represent the trade-off between flexibility and commitment, according to the study, “Managing a Portfolio of Real Options” co-authored by Ohio State researcher Jaideep Anand and with researchers Raffaele Oriani in Italy and Roberto S. Vassolo in Argentina.   While growth options relate to early commitment in growth opportunities, switching options give firms essential forms of flexibility to handle different sources of uncertainty. Too much commitment could create vulnerability; too little could hinder competitive advantages.

So how do you determine the right balance for your unique market? Let’s consider the sources of uncertainty within growth opportunities and switching opportunities. Some sources generate growth opportunities while others might induce switching opportunities, according to the study. For example, when market demand is the main source of uncertainty, growth opportunities may dominate the strategic decision. These elements are applied to different strategic situations of technological and market uncertainty. Managers must consider what is unique about their portfolio and how they can incorporate that when assessing its value. They must first understand how market and technological uncertainty can have different effects on the value of switching and growth options.

When the market has inconsistencies between demand and the need for new products, it affects the market size and ultimately, sales. In this case, growth options could limit firms’ losses to their initial investments. However, potential gains from future growth opportunities are unlimited.

When the market has technological uncertainty, firms must choose the “right” technology. Here firms can apply switching options that allow them to hedge against the risk of being locked out of the market because they have not invested in the right technology.

Based on your industry’s unique market and focusing on the opportunities available, these are important considerations to keep in mind in a world of quickly advancing technologies and ever shifting markets. To dig deeper into this topic, view the original research and its translation here.