G.O.A.L.S.

Global awareness is an extremely sought after attribute in modern society for a reason. I believe global awareness can be achieved both through in-person experience and studying. Personally I would like to maintain global awareness by pursuing a second language, most likely Spanish, and being able to use that cultural knowledge and language proficiency to enter in and experience other parts of the world I would have otherwise been unable to. I also feel like it is my responsibility to continuously engage with multiple people groups around me, and have participated in “people group engagements” with my campus church group. By doing this, I strive to understand and appreciate other culture’s interests and differences, while being able to relate them back to mine. Maybe even potentially more important, I’m able to interact with others and realize our similarities.

My interest in research started my senior year of high school when I was given the opportunity to engage in an independent research project. For the first time, I engaged in the production of knowledge, something I found to be extremely stimulating and inherently important in an advancing society. As a student who wishes to enter the medical field, it’s almost a requirement that some form of individual research and contribution to the field will be done within my time as a student. Of course, I would like to engage in labs as soon as possible and work closely with professors to first learn what they are engaging in. I think from learning and gaining experience from working along with professors, I will be more apt to embark on my own research. The wonderful thing that comes from research in this widely connected world is that knowledge is shared and collaborated on across the globe. I hope one day I will be able to attempt research on a team in a different country.

I believe what is going to separate many students in college is the mentality of the pursuit of knowledge. Before I have found myself simply following the requirements in order to achieve the standardized goals set forth by the schools and committees, but was never actively engaging in any of the material I was presented with. When I entered college I made it a point to be interested in the work I do, and to not allow myself to grow tired or “bored” with my studies. In order to achieve this, I enrolled in honors courses and courses that are out of my comfort zone. With such a great resources at OSU, I felt it would have been a waste if I don’t make the best of the opportunities. Also, while it’s important that I’m engaging in challenging material inside my class, I have also taken up a few suggestions by my professors to read scholarly books outside of class to further my own knowledge.

Leadership can come in quiet and small ways. I, myself, have never been a loud and initiative leader, but I work to actively fill in spots where leadership is lacking. For me, this means sometimes small things, such as speaking up during class or organizing study groups. This also means providing guidance to others who need it, whether by mentoring and tutoring, or guiding people to resources. I also acknowledge that my experiences put me in a position to take charge in some areas of my life. Specifically, I know that in a few years I will find myself having to set examples for underclass I know, and I’ll have to take up leadership roles in my co-curricular to take my part in continuing them.

I’m extremely excited about on-campus service opportunities. My whole life I’ve been naturally compelled to participate in volunteer opportunities and to give back to the community that brought me up. Already on campus I’ve signed up for Buck-I-Serve and tutoring at the Bridge with my on-campus church. While volunteering is almost seen as a mandatory action for pre-med applications, I feel like volunteering should remain a purely altruistic activity. Small actions can lead to big changes, so I’m committing myself to help where I can, and to put myself in a position to share my blessings with others.