International Affairs Reflection #3

For my third category of events for the International Affairs scholars program, I attended the Breathe Hope OSU Service Event making blankets for children with cystic fibrosis on Thursday, November 15 from 7:00-8:00 PM in the Ohio Staters Inc. Room in Ohio Union. This event fulfilled the service requirement.

This activity impacted me because it allowed me to make a difference in a child’s life without taking a significant chunk of time out of my day. This serves as an example that we can all volunteer some portion of our time every day to create good in the world and make a positive impact. With only one hour, I was able to cut and tie blankets together to give to children with cystic fibrosis.

This event relates to the topic of International Affairs because kindness makes the world go round. There is so much conflict and negatively between countries but simple service and giving can change lives. Peaceful discussion and helping others when possible will solve numerous issues. This is something that diplomats consistently try to combat and improve across communities. We can do more to improve relations between people starting with our own living community all the way to countries around the world.

After attending the event I was interested in learning more about cystic fibrosis. I learned that it is “a progressive, genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and limits the ability to breathe over time” (Cystic Fibrosis Foundation). It is nice to know that the affected kids truly receive things that they need. Personally, I gained a new perspective on volunteering as well as basic knowledge on how to construct tie blankets. Professionally, I had more experience working with others to achieve a common goal. I brought my IA friend Becca to the event and we worked together to complete the blanket.

While not necessarily coursework, this event relates to many of the topics addressed in the foundations of being a Morrill Scholar. It encompasses leadership, service, and social justice. There is even a service learning class offered that allows students to volunteer outside of class and experience meaningful contributions to society. The academic specifics also overlap with my biology class. We learned about genetics and cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease. People must have two copies of the defective gene, one from each parent. Therefore children can also become carriers. It is interesting to see how genetics actually affects peoples lives and the diseases that can emerge from mutations.

After attending this event, I wonder how else I can become involved with the Breathe Hope club. I truly agree with their missions and values. Based on their student organization description I can tell they host a variety of events through yoga, service, educational events, and community outreach. I also wonder how else I can become involved with service events and volunteer activities around me. I am interested in finding other one hours events to make my impact on the world. There are countless opportunities out there, it is just up to me to find them and utilize them for good.

 

Sources:

https://www.cff.org/What-is-CF/About-Cystic-Fibrosis/

https://activities.osu.edu/involvement/student_organizations/find_a_student_org/?i=bb5a5df6-8fbb-401a-89dd-ef68d3d02736&l=B&c=Columbus&page=3

International Affairs Reflection #2

For my second category of events for the International Affairs scholars program, I attended the U.S. State Department Information Session on Tuesday, October 30th from 3:00-4:30 PM in Cockins Hall. This event fulfilled the non-IA requirement. The topic was discussed by Dale Giovengo, diplomat in residence of the North Central region.

This event impacted my view on government jobs and future options for my personal career. Before listening to the speaker, I had a preconceived notion that government jobs were boring and a waste of time and resources. However, it seems very interesting to be able to travel to a variety of countries and serve as a diplomat. I was impressed by the sheer number of opportunities available to college students. There were four main categories of work described at the U.S. Department of State level including student programs, civil service, foreign service specialists, and foreign service officers. I am probably most likely to do the unpaid internship program at this point in my college After hearing about the differences between jobs I  had a different perspective on solving conflict with other countries. This relates to International Affairs because it is vital to maintain peace and negotiate with other world powers to benefit all parties.

I gained academic knowledge about specific details regarding the national government and programs currently in place. I learned that national security has a 70 billion dollar budget. I also found it interesting that a majority of the 71000 employees in the state department are foreign service nationals/locals that solve issues in the area. Dale Giovengo spoke about his personal experience before becoming involved with embassy operations in Albania, Pakistan, Switzerland, Iraq, and other countries. It was very beneficial to hear first-hand experience of working for the government. The amount of travel required could be fulfilling, but also rough on family life.

As a finance major, I did not think there were many professional opportunities with the U.S. Department of State. Before listening to Dale, I thought government jobs were mainly for people in public affairs or international studies. However, I was pleased to discover that there isn’t a specific major required to obtain a job in this category. Personally, I am interested in international business and believe this would be a good way to get involved in global interactions. Although I haven’t specifically discussed this kind of topic in any recent coursework, I am sure that I will learn more in my classes focused on international business.

After attending this event I am interested in learning more about the first steps I should take to get into programs and which ones I should apply for initially. I wonder if I have a good personality to succeed in these jobs or what I should do to improve my chances. I think I am still more interested in corporate finance but going down the government track could be an educational experience. Although it might not be my specific path, I was still glad to have learned about other options available.

Year in Review

[ “Year in Review”  is where you should reflect on the past year and show how you have evolved as a person and as a student.  You may want to focus on your growth in a particular area (as a leader, scholar, researcher, etc.) or you may want to talk about your overall experience over the past year.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

G.O.A.L.S.

[ “G.O.A.L.S.” is a place where students write about how their planned, current, and future activities may fit into the Honors & Scholars G.O.A.L.S.: Global Awareness, Original Inquiry, Academic Enrichment, Leadership Development, and Service Engagement. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.

  • Global Awareness: Students cultivate and develop their appreciation for diversity and each individual’s unique differences. For example, consider course work, study abroad, involvement in cultural organizations or activities, etc.
  • Original Inquiry: Honors & Scholars students understand the research process by engaging in experiences ranging from in-class scholarly endeavors to creative inquiry projects to independent experiences with top researchers across campus and in the global community. For example, consider research, creative productions or performances, advanced course work, etc.
  • Academic Enrichment: Honors & Scholars students pursue academic excellence through rigorous curricular experiences beyond the university norm both in and out of the classroom.
  • Leadership Development: Honors & Scholars students develop leadership skills that can be demonstrated in the classroom, in the community, in their co-curricular activities, and in their future roles in society.
  • Service Engagement: Honors & Scholars students commit to service to the community.]

Career

[“Career” is where you can collect information about your experiences and skills that will apply to your future career.  Like your resume, this is information that will evolve over time and should be continually updated.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

Artifacts

[Artifacts are the items you consider to be representative of your academic interests and achievements. For each entry, include both an artifact and a detailed annotation.  An annotation includes both a description of the artifact and a reflection on why it is important to you, what you learned, and what it means for your next steps.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

About Me

[Your “About Me” is a brief biographical statement that might include your intended major, your academic interests, your goals, as well as the things that make you unique.  Definitely include a picture! Also, remember that you can always update this post at any point. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

International Affairs Reflection #1

To kick off the year with the International Affairs scholars program, I attended the Current Events Conversation on Sunday, August 26th from 5:00-6:00 PM in the Glass Classroom in Smith-Steeb. This event fulfilled the academic requirement.

This activity impacted me by opening my eyes from the beginning of the year to issues going on the world. Coming into the program I realized I wasn’t keeping up with current events as much as I should have been and I was dedicated to learning more about the world. This event relates to the topic of International Affairs because it involves a different country and the impact on not only the United States but countless other countries. For Venezuela to recover from this situation, the assistance of other countries is all but necessary.

On the surface level, I gained academic knowledge about the Venezuelan economic crisis. The country has long relied on oil and spent too much while the price of oil was high leaving nothing for when the price fell. There has been little if any improvement in the industry resulting in destruction for the nation. I also gained some professional experience by discussing current events and providing my opinion. I generally find myself listening to and observing others instead of participating and I believe I spoke up more than usual. I found this conversation very beneficial in getting to know my starting place and well as where everyone else in the group was.

Personally, I found it interesting how many bills were required to purchase seemingly everyday items. Stacks of millions of bolivars could be translated to a few US dollars. It is mind-blowing that people have to carry so much cash to buy chicken, tomatoes, toilet paper, carrots, soap, and diapers. I was fascinated that eggs had started to become a form of currency as people reverted to bartering. This concept of repeating history and reverting to old methods is baffling but so common. I have always been taught that the purpose of history is to learn from mistakes and adapt to improve the future. This situation in Venezuela makes me question why we are not taking actions to better the world.

This event relates to the topic of economics that I have previously learned about. After defaulting on countless debts, Venezuela couldn’t borrow more international money. This created a difficult situation not handled in the best way. Simply printing more money will only cause a higher inflation rate. President Maduro tried to create a solution to this problem by introducing a new “Sovereign Bolivar” with five fewer zeroes. However, it is not so simply corrected.

After attending this event, I would question what Venezuela should do next. They are currently in turmoil with desperate attempts to fix problems with no avail. Varying sources estimate about one million percent inflation by the end of the year. Waves of people are attempting to flee the country as conditions only worsen. I believe the currency should be anchored to something with more backing. Other countries probably need to intervene and try to assist before Venezuela is completely done for. Overall, this was a positive first experience and I cannot wait to learn more about the world I am living in.

 

Sources:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-45262525

https://news.sky.com/story/why-is-venezuela-a-country-in-turmoil-11478533

https://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/see-how-many-bills-it-took-buy-chicken-venezuela-n902491

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mL8d91vdR9g