Black Church Food Security Network

Image courtesy of blackchurchfoodsecurity.net

The Black Church Food Security Network connects growers, especially Black farmers and urban growers, with historically African American congregations. Black churches have proven to be a strong-hold even in vulnerable communities, and the Black Church Food Security Network embraces the history and ability of the black church to make significant and lasting change in their communities. Their “Soil to Sanctuary” community markets work to provide and establish a cooperative partnership between growers and consumers. Currently they support the Mid-Atlantic region, but they are working to publish a guide to support those who want to start a garden at the local congregation level.

This organization was created by Rev. Dr. Heber M Brown.

To learn more about the Black Church Food Security Network click here.

“Your Money or Your Life” in Simpler Living, Compassionate Life

To see a general overview of Simpler Living, Compassionate Life click here.

In this section: “Spending Money as if Life Really Mattered” by Evy McDonald (59-66); “Money” by William Stringfellow (67-72)

Many people are uncomfortable talking about money. Discussion of income, savings, or giving often makes people blanche. The taboo that the American culture places on talking about money makes conversations of faithful stewardship of one’s money difficult. However, McDonald and Stringfellow bring nuanced approaches to bear in this section, which is the first to really analyze our use of money.

McDonald shares her realization that time = money. She reflects on how her life, especially as a consumer, changed when she began asking whether an item she was considering purchasing was worth the hours of work it would take to make the money needed to buy the item. If an item is not worth the time, she moves on. McDonald’s essay doesn’t vilify money, but encourages readers to become thoughtful consumers.

Stringfellow holds a mirror to the idolization of money. His essay recognizes that the obsession with money has made it a moral measure as well. We’ve come to believe that more money = moral excellence. Stringfellow calls for freedom from this idol. He affirms that money itself is not bad, but our placing money and the acquisition of money above God is wrong.

This section calls the reader to question their own relationship with money, which is helpful preparation for later sections that will widen the scope, turning to larger societal structures.

After Simpler Living, Compassionate Life, Michael Schut also published Money and Faith: The Search for Enough. To learn more about this publication click here to be taken to his website.

“Pope Tells Oil Executives to Act on Climate: ‘There Is No Time to Lose’”

Image courtesy of NYT and CreditMaurizio Brambatti/EPA, via Shutterstock

Pope Francis continued his efforts to uplift climate change as a focus of global Catholic action with a conference of oil company executives at the Vatican in early June 2018. The pope, who has called for a swift energy transition away from fossil fuels and to more renewable energy sources, praised progress made by big oil companies while pushing for even further change.

In his statements on climate change, Pope Francis argues for our present duty to care for the gift of the earth for ourselves as well as future generations. He also recognizes that the poor will be disproportionately affected by global warming.

The Global Catholic Climate Movement has followed the pope’s directive and removed funding from organizations which support fossil fuel. Catholic universities, like Notre Dame, are working on plans to remove fossil fuels from their own energy production.

For more on Global Catholic Climate Movement click here. To be directed to the article originally published on the New York Times click here.

Evangelical Environmental Network: Resource Page

One book recommended by EEN. Image courtesy of creationcare.org.

The online resource page for the  Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) offers many helpful resources for clergy and lay persons looking to engage their faith with care of the environment.

This page gives introductory resources for those entering the conversation as well as practical implementation of creation care. Sermon starters and devotionals provide links for personal or community consideration of scripture and environment.  It also links to books recommended by the EEN in Creation Care, Food and Food Policy, National Parks and Public Lands, Sustainable Business, and Children’s books. This section of the page may be especially useful for those looking to do a book study in creation care.

Click here to be directed to the EEN’s resource page.

Evangelical Environmental Network: September Sermon Starters & Devotional Series

Picture courtesy of creationcare.org

EEN has created the Sermon Starters and Devotional Series where they release a new resource monthly. For the month of September, they released Shout it From the Mountaintop. Its theme is meant to show that creation belongs to God and people are called as stewards to testify to His Majesty. To read the entire document, click here.

August Sermon Starters and Devotional Series:

Evangelical Environmental Network Creation Care Sermon Starters and Devotional Series for August

July Sermon Starters and Devotional Series:

Evangelical Environmental Network Creation Care Sermon Starters and Devotional Series for July

Earth and Spirit Council

Credit: Earth and Spirit Council FaceBook Page

The Earth and Spirit Council is a 501(c)(3) volunteer educational organization located in Portland, Oregon that was formed in 1991. They are a group of environmental and spiritual leaders who are on a mission to connect individuals to the natural world through art, education, ceremonies and cultural events. Learn more about the Earth and Spirit Council on their website (here) and FaceBook page (here).

 

 

Columbus bonds with Ghana sister city through agriculture project

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20170829/columbus-bonds-with-ghana-sister-city-through-agriculture-project

In 2015, Roman Catholic Cardinal Peter Turkson visited Ohio and the proceeds from his talk with OSU President Michael Drake at Mershon Auditorium were used as matching funds in a grant from the Initiative for Food and Agricultural Transformation (InFACT) discovery theme program to fund an agricultural exchange between Accra, Ghana, and Columbus, Ohio. Last week, three Ghanaian high school students involved in YMCA and 4-H visited Columbus in response to this sister city and sister garden initiative. The Columbus Dispatch reported on their visit… Read more.

 

 

The Global Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways (GCILL)

The Global Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways (GCILL) is an informal umbrella created to support short-term and long-term projects that educate and inform people about indigenous ways of knowing and wisdom for modern times—spirituality that raises human consciousness and harmonious relationship with Mother Earth. The focus of the GCILL has evolved over time first focusing on public speaking by sharing the message of wisdomkeepers (including the work of Ilarion “Larry” Merculieff), helping others and Mother Earth. They then focused on speaking engagements in order to help people create programs to discuss good dialogue surrounding difficult issues. They hope to become their own 501c3 non-profit organization.

Here are GCILL’s current focus areas:

 

 

 

 

Environmental Justice Resources

Organizations and their resources for Environmental Justice:This post provides links to a number of environmental resources.

GreenFaith:

Color of Change is a racial justice organization that help individuals effectively respond to injustice in the world around us. Color of Change was launched September 1, 2005 three weeks after Hurricane Katrina hits the Gulf Coast and the Bush administration’s failed response shocks the nation, James Rucker and Van Jones email roughly 1,000 friends asking them to pledge to make sure all Americans are represented, served, and protected–regardless of race or class.

New York Times Article: A Question of Environmental Racism in Flint

 

www.greenfaith.org

www.colorofchange.org

Environmetal Racism and Flint Water Crisis

https://www.nytimes.com/

“Environmental Racism” is a term coined in the 1980s by Benjamin Chavis, a civil rights activist. On February 18, 2016, Rev. Fletcher Harper, Rev. Lawrence Jennings and Rev. Dr. Melanie L. Harris gave a presentation: Flint, Environmental Racism and the Black Church, which talks about the history of environmental racism and religion, the Flint Michigan water crisis, and literature on African American Environmental History. The PDF presentation can be viewed here