Black Church Food Security Network

Image courtesy of blackchurchfoodsecurity.net

The Black Church Food Security Network connects growers, especially Black farmers and urban growers, with historically African American congregations. Black churches have proven to be a strong-hold even in vulnerable communities, and the Black Church Food Security Network embraces the history and ability of the black church to make significant and lasting change in their communities. Their “Soil to Sanctuary” community markets work to provide and establish a cooperative partnership between growers and consumers. Currently they support the Mid-Atlantic region, but they are working to publish a guide to support those who want to start a garden at the local congregation level.

This organization was created by Rev. Dr. Heber M Brown.

To learn more about the Black Church Food Security Network click here.

Profile: Rev. Dr. Heber M Brown

Image courtesy of heberbrown.com

Rev. Dr. Heber M. Brown is a Baptist pastor in Baltimore, Maryland. Brown is committed to social development and has been instrumental in the creation of several programs in the Baltimore area. These include Orita’s Cross Freedom School, of which he is the founding director, and the Black Church Food Security Network. The latter works to support the accessibility of food by linking historically African American congregations with urban growers and Black farmers. Brown has received a number of awards recognizing his work, including the Ella Baker Freedom Fighter Award and the Food Justice Award from the Baltimore City Office of Civil Rights.

To learn more about The Black Church Food Security Network click here.

To be taken to Brown’s personal website click here.

Eating Simply for Lent

Picture courtesy of catholicclimatemovement.global

“Growing in simplicity for Lent is a gift of the spirit. We now know that it’s also a way to sustainably inhabit our place in God’s creation.”

Global Catholic Climate Movement is focusing on protecting creation this Lent. They are advocating for “Eating Simply,” by adding a day of plant-based meals to your diet, or eating only plant based meals during Lent. They offer recipes and easy meals to help the transition. To read more or to make the commitment to eat simply, click here.

Meet Sālote: a Young Witness to Climate Change

Picture courtesy of http://operationnoah.org/

Sālote is a video produced by Operation Noah that aims to hep Christians around the world recognize the human cost of climate change, and particularly its impact on women and children. The video was made in partnership with World Day of Prayer and is inspired by real-life accounts of present-day climate change impacts. To watch the short video, click here.

The Biblical Basis for Advocacy to end Hunger

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This document from Bread for the World provides nine biblical themes that guide their mission to end hunger. They cite scripture for each theme to show why they believe it is their duty to love all people and ensure that no person goes hungry. To read more, click here.

Bread for the World: Have Faith. End Hunger.

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Bread for the World is a collective Christian voice urging the nation’s decision makers to end hunger at home and abroad. By changing policies, programs, and conditions that allow hunger and poverty to exist, they provide help and opportunity at home and abroad to end hunger.

“God’s grace in Jesus Christ moves us to help our neighbors, whether they live in the next house, the next state, or the next continent.”

To read more about Bread for the World or to get engaged with their work towards eradicating hunger, click here.

Religious Statements on Climate Change

Picture courtesy of interfaithpowerandlight.org

 

Interfaith Power & Light has compiled a list of different religious community’s statements on climate change. The list includes statements from different denominations including: Baha’i, Buddhist, Christianity, Hindu, Interfaith, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh, and Unitarian Universalist. To view the entire list and to read more about the individual statements, click here.

Catholic Relief Services Best Photographs 2018

This photo is part of CRS' best photos of 2018, it's the tsunami in Indonesia.

Picture courtesy of crs.org; Photographer Mohammed Hafiz

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) has created the “Through the Lens of Our Photographers,” project. This is its third year of the CRS Photos Department’s annual collection of the best photos of the year. CRS Photo Librarian Lauren Carroll and Photo Editor Philip Laubner hope to offer photos that have a “lasting impact and transcend their parts to represent something bigger, something universal, something that talks to a larger human truth.” To view all of the photographs from 2018, click here.

 

Build a Catholic Relief Services Ark of Hope

CRS: Catholic Relief Services

Picture courtesy of crs.org

“Remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature—every mortal being that is on Earth.” – Genesis 9:16

Catholic Relief Services (CRS) created Ark of Hope as a way to get communities engaged in a fun and creative way. Relating to the hope and promise from the story of Noah’s Ark, the CRS Ark of Hope program allows communities to donate symbolic animals to people in need as they “build an ark.” As communities work towards their goal, they can color in animals and place them on an arc. The materials included with this program are lesson plans, a prayer service, coloring pages, and a bulletin-board Ark to show the progress communities are making towards reaching their goals and building their ark. To read more or begin an Ark of Hope, click here.

Sisters of Earth: Hopes and Dreams

Picture courtesy of globalsistersreport.org

How to Face the Mess We’re in without Going Crazy, is the subtitle of Joanna Macy’s book Active Hope, which was the inspiration for Sisters of Earth gathering that took place July 12-15 at Mount Saint Joseph, home of the Sisters of Charity in Cincinnati, Ohio. Cincinnati was chosen as the location partly because of the ancestral inspiration of Sister of Charity Paula Gonzalez, who promoted solar power and sustainability projects and teachings throughout the Catholic world. This year, nearly 100 women from the United States and Canada began by remembering Sister Paula and discussing questions like: Who are we? Where are we? How did we get here and what is possible? And — where do we go from here? To read more on the Sisters of Earth and the Cincinnati gathering, click here.