Using the Logic Model and Family Life Education Planning Wheel

On April 21, 2020, Ohio State University Extension Professionals will partner with the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) to present a webinar on Using the Logic Model and the Planning Wheel to Strengthen Communication, Planning, and Assessment of Family Life Education Programs. To learn more about the webinar and to register, please visit NCFR’s page.

This webpage will share the links to resources noted in the webinar presentation. Presenter bios and emails at the end of this page.

Logic Model

  • Logic Models, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Program Development and Evaluation, Division of Extension, (includes templates)

Family Life Education Framework

Extension

Additional Resources

References

Bredehoft, D.J., & Walcheski, M.J., Eds. (2011). Family Life Education Framework Poster and PowerPoint – 3rd. Ed. Minneapolis, MN: National Council on Family Relations.

Bredehoft, D.J., & Walcheski, M.J. (2009). Family life education: Integrating theory and practice. Minneapolis, MN: National Council on Family Relations.

Clarke, J. I, (1984). Who, Me Lead a Group? Seattle, WA: Parenting Press, Inc.

Gravel, E. (nd). Diverse Families. Retrieved April 14, 2020 from http://elisegravel.com/en/blog/diverse-families/

Keller, A., & Bauerle, J. A. (2009).  Using a logic model to relate the strategic to the tactical in program planning and evaluation:  An illustration based on social norms interventions.  American Journal of Health Promotion, 24, 89-92.

Myers-Walls, J. A., Ballard, S. M., Darling, C. A. and Myers-Bowman, K. S. (2011). Reconceptualizing the Domain and Boundaries of Family Life Education. Family Relations, 60, 357–372.

National Council on Family Relations – What is Family Life Education. https://www.ncfr.org/cfle-certification/what-family-life-education

University of Wisconsin – Extension, Program Development and Development, Logic Model. https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/programdevelopment/logic-models/

Presenter Bios

Patrice Powers-Barker, CFLE, is an Ohio State University Extension Educator in Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) in Lucas County, Toledo, Ohio. She holds a master’s degree in Family Life Education from Spring Arbor University and a bachelor’s degree from Hiram College. She works with families on topics including wellness, food safety, household budgeting, mindfulness, local foods, and universal design. Beyond using her Certified Family Life Educator credential to directly reach families in her community, she is also interested in encouraging other professionals to recognize the value of their work with families. She has worked with teams to make useful and meaningful connections between the FCS profession and resources from NCFR, and she serves on the Ohio Council for Family Relations Board of Directors.  Powers-barker.1@osu.edu

Katie Schlagheck, CFLE, started in June 2014 as the FCS educator in a split position with Sandusky County and Ottawa County for the Ohio State University. She also serves on the Ohio Council for Family Relations Board of Directors. She holds a master’s degree in human development and family studies from Central Michigan University and a bachelor’s degree in human development from Washington State University. In her professional role, she is always on the lookout for new partnerships and collaborations in order to strengthen programming in the community. schlagheck.11@osu.edu

Jim Bates, Ph.D., is a tenured associate professor and extension Field Specialist of Family Wellness in the FCS program area of Ohio State University Extension. He holds an adjunct appointment in the Department of Human Sciences in the Human Development and Family Sciences program area. He holds a doctoral degree in child and family studies from Syracuse University, a master’s degree in developmental studies from Purdue University, and a bachelor’s degree in marriage, family, and human development from Brigham Young University. He has taught courses in family relations; family life program design, implementation, and evaluation; parenting; intergenerational relationships; and research methods and applied statistics. He has formed partnerships with community outreach organizations to evaluate programs and has consulted on a multi-state, multi-year projects. His program themes as a Specialist in Family Wellness with Ohio State University Extension are intergenerational family relationships; family resiliency; and Family Life Education program design, implementation, evaluation, and analysis. bates.402@osu.edu

Reviewing Annual Work Goals

I just celebrated my work anniversary on March first! Although this list of broad list of goals is not new, I wanted to put them down in writing.

  1. Be mindful.
  2. Be prepared.
  3. Be intentional.
  4. Clearly communicate emotions.
  5. Keep striving for high ideals.

Be mindful.  An established definition of mindfulness comes from John Kabat-Zinn: “paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally”. Employers have been encouraged to offer mindfulness exercises through worksite wellness programs as one way to reduce absences and increase productivity among staff. In addition, there are personal benefits to practicing mindfulness. The Extension employee who practices mindfulness is better prepared to react in a positive way to daily changes and challenges on the job as well as to boost the enjoyment of the successes and highlights of their career.

The practice of mindfulness will help you handle daily changes and challenges”…. and boost the enjoyment of the successes and highlights! I use mindfulness to help remind myself to breathe, focus, increase gratitude, decrease judgments and work from an asset based approach.

Be prepared.  I know this sounds like the Scouts motto but it’s a good goal for Extension staff.  Although flexibility is important for an Extension Educator, flexibility is a great second step to a well-prepared program. In addition, I have learned from previous colleagues that “unprep” time is just as important as “prep” time for classes. It takes time to unpack bags, restock handouts, input evaluations and return emails to participants about questions not answered during class. I’m not very good at scheduling unprep time.

Plan the work. Work the plan. ~ Paraphrased from Margaret Thatcher

Be intentional. First, be intentional with words, especially in public settings. Don’t default to acronyms or people’s first names when anyone in the group might be struggling to keep up with the information. Make it easy to follow up with contact information, links to specific articles or research. In addition to being intentional with words, adopt the five elements of brave space: Controversy with civility, Own your intentions and your impact, Challenge by choice, Respect and No attacks (Aroa & Clemens, 2013).

The National Council on Family Relations listed skills and knowledge needed for healthy family functioning.  They are also valuable in the workplace:

  • strong communication skills
  • knowledge of typical human development
  • good decision-making skills, positive self-esteem
  • healthy interpersonal relationships

I benefit from the work of my professional organizations and continued professional development. I use what I learn to strengthen my work. In 2020 when information is all around us, 24/7, I need to be intentional to take the time to read and use the information from my professional organizations and colleagues. As a Certified Family Life Educator, I am intentional about using an educational, preventative and strengths-based approach to support and empower individuals and families.

Clearly communicate emotions. This summary is from Understanding Your Emotions for Teen Health: “All emotions tell us something about ourselves and our situation. But sometimes we find it hard to accept what we feel. We might judge ourselves for feeling a certain way, like if we feel jealous, for example. But instead of thinking we shouldn’t feel that way, it’s better to notice how we actually feel.” Emotions, whether we label them as good or bad, are part of the human experience.

One we notice how we actually feel, it can be challenging to share with others, especially when experiencing strong emotions. The following description and example is taken from Manage Your Money, Ohio State University Extension, Lesson One: The Three Parts of an I-Message

  1. “I feel …” Make a clear statement of how you feel. (note, name your emotion, not what you are thinking)
  2. “When (this happens) …” Name specific behavior that caused you to feel that way.
  3. “Because …” Say why the behavior or event is upsetting.

 Instead of a “you-message” that tends to reflect blame and criticism, the “I-Messages” focus on specific examples. Instead of: “You never record the amounts of checks you write.” Try this: “I feel frustrated when we have to pay an overdraft fee from our checking account when [because] we don’t have enough money to cover the automatic bill payment for the utility company.”  (Manage Your Money)

I would like to add an additional statement and reminder.

Additional Statement: Feel free to add a fourth statement after the three part I-Message: “What I need is …” State what you need.

Reminder: Although this is a helpful communication framework to use when upset, it can also be used for positive feelings or emotions. For example, “I feel optimistic for our statewide FCS program when I hear about the good work and programs that my FCS county colleagues are offering across the state because it gives me inspiration. What I need is to keep up communication on this type of information on a regular basis.”

Keep striving for high ideals.

“I believe in my own work and in the opportunity I have to make my life useful to humanity. Because I believe these things, I am an Extension professional”. Extension Professional’s Creed

“I accept the opportunity to empower individuals, families and communities to meet their needs and goals through a learning partnership”. The National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Creed.

“Keep interest in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time… Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind to you what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism …” from Desiderata by Max Ehrmann (1927).

Keep striving for high ideals. And surround yourself with heroes.

Thank you for your input on two new Family Life Education Infographics

If you have completed the online survey to share your thoughts on the infographics – Thank You!

The Family Life Education (FLE) Framework has successfully guided program development, delivery, and assessment. In an effort to help make the FLE Framework approachable for students and professionals, a team of Certified Family Life Education (CFLE) practitioners have designed two infographics. The goal is to share the value and content of the conceptual model in a way that FLE students and professionals can easily access, view, and implement FLE methodology in their classroom assignments. These infographics are designed to complement, not replace the National Council on Family Relations’ current FLE Framework materials.

Click on the links below for a full size view of the two Infographics

Family Life Education Framework Infographic

 

 

 

 

Family Life Education Methodology: The Planning Wheel

The Planning Wheel photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2016: We are looking for people in the field of FLE (including students) to view and respond to two new infographics. The online response/survey should take less than five minutes to complete. If you are interested in sharing your thoughts, please email Patrice Powers-Barker, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences at powers-barker.1@osu.edu for a link to the online survey.

 

 

 

 

 

Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) utilizing Family Life Education (FLE)

For a link to both infographics, (Family Life Education Framework: Across the Lifespan and Family Life Education Methodology: The Planning Wheel) please visit FLE Infographics

Introduction to Family Life Education (FLE) Infographics

The Family Life Education (FLE) Framework has successfully guided program development, delivery, and assessment. In an effort to help make the FLE Framework approachable for students and professionals, a team of Certified Family Life Education (CFLE) practitioners have designed two infographics. The goal is to share the value and content of the conceptual model in a way that FLE students and professionals can easily access, view, and implement FLE methodology in their classroom assignments. These infographics are designed to complement, not replace the National Council on Family Relations’ current FLE Framework materials.

Short History

In 2015, a small group of Family Life Educators in OSU Extension (all members of the National Council of Family Relations and actively working on certification and recertification for family life education) met to better understand, utilize and share the resources of our field of study and our professional organizations. The National Council of Family Relations (NCFR) is the premier professional association for the multidisciplinary understanding of families. Although the NCFR’s Family Life Education (FLE) Framework undoubtedly complements the work of Family and Consumer Sciences, we also encourage our Extension colleagues in other program areas to recognize themselves as Family Life Educators. As Extension staff, we all have the same goals of sharing research-based information in the community, utilizing best practices for presenting that content and helping improve the lives of Ohioans.

 

Family Life Education Methodology Planning Wheel

Family Life Education Methodology Planning Wheel

FLE Framework, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Resources:
What Is Human Ecology? Dr. Cheryl Achterberg, Scholar in Nutritional Development, Dean of The Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology.

For more information including a link to both infographics, (Family Life Education Framework: Across the Lifespan and Family Life Education Methodology: The Planning Wheel) please visit We welcome your input on two new infographics related to Family Life Education

Family Life Education Methodology, Family Life Education Methodology Planning Wheel

Handout, Family Life Educator Content Areas, Worksheet for Family and Consumer Sciences Examples

Presentations:

Contact:

Please contact us with any questions, ideas or comments on how you have used Family Life Education Methodology in your work.