OSU Extension Mindfulness In-Service 2020

For more information about the OSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Mindful Wellness Program please visit the website. 

Agenda, Handouts and Links, August 20, 2020

As part of the 2020 Family and Consumer Sciences Professional Development Monthly In-services that have moved to a virtual platform, we are pleased to invite all OSU Extension staff to join our August Mindfulness In-Service. This In-Service will focus on the 2019 Mindful Wellness Curriculum, general resources, an on-your-own mindfulness activity, and experiences related to the broad topic of mindfulness. Mindfulness is applicable to OSU staff across all Extension program areas. Participants decided if they wanted to attend one, two, three, or all four of the August 20th sessions.

Description of Session 1: Introduction to Mindfulness, using the OSU Extension Mindful Wellness Curriculum 9:00AM-10:30AM

The Mindful Wellness curriculum (2019) is designed to equip healthy adults with practice and skills to strengthen the mind and body connection and promote holistic health and wellness across the lifespan. Participants in this session will participate in the one-hour Introduction to Mindfulness class and will learn more about the Mindful Wellness curriculum. For those who have previously attended a Mindful Wellness Curriculum training, the presentation will look familiar to what has been shared in the past but you are welcome to attend. We have found that we always learn something new about mindfulness even if it is an introduction lesson. Presenters: Melinda Hill, Marie Economos, Pat Holmes and Chris Kendle.

Description of Session 2: Mindfulness as a Tool During COVID-19, 11:00AM-12:00PM

Even before the arrival of COVID-19, stress had already been identified as a major health problem for Americans. Not only do we need to care for health and wellness when there is illness, but we also need to practice preventive care to stay well physically, mentally, and emotionally. Although we could never cover all of the resources related to mindfulness, this session will highlight some easily accessible, online, educational resources. They will be shared as timely tools for personal and professional use during this time of uncertainty. Presenters: Patrice Powers-Barker, Shari Gallup and Laura Stanton.

Description of Session 3: Mindful Afternoon Special – Your Choice

Do you remember “specials” in school like classes for art, physical education and music? We invite you to plan a mindfulness special today.  We know the days are busy, you need to fit things in and multitasking seems like the only option. We also know the benefits of practicing mindfulness. We invite you to use this time for personal mindfulness practice. We will share a list of ideas prior to the day, have an open zoom call (with music but no discussion or lesson) and then collect a list (via chat) of what our colleagues chose to do to practice mindfulness.

Description of Session 4: Mindfulness Panel, 2:00PM-3:30PM

In Mindful Foundations (one of the individual lessons within the Mindful Wellness curriculum series) instructors are encouraged to, “Open the class with a short example from your own mindfulness journey. This is so powerful for the class to understand the how and why of your passion for topic.” Join this session to learn from FCS colleagues who have found a mindfulness practice that works best for them. Practicing mindfulness offers not only personal benefits but can also increase professional excellence.

  • Some of our colleagues have previously shared about their mindfulness journeys via blog posts on Live Smart Ohio  (mind and body category)
  • Thank you Pat Bebo for moderating the panel. Panelists: Kathy Tutt, Shannon Carter, Patrice Powers-Barker with assistance by Laura Stanton.

Questions? The following professionals are on the 2020 Mindful Wellness Team and help with the planning and presentation of this in-service (all emails coming soon!)

Stacey Baker baker.782@osu.edu

Shannon Carter Carter.314@osu.edu

Marie Economos economos.2@osu.edu

Shari Gallup gallup.1@osu.edu

Whitney Gherman gherman.12@osu.edu

Misty Harmon harmon.416@osu.edu

Melinda Hill hill.14@osu.edu

Pat Holmes holmes.86@osu.edu

Chris Kendle kendle.4@osu.edu

Patrice Powers-Barker powers-barker.1@osu.edu

Roseanne Scammahorn scammahorn.5@osu.edu

Laura Stanton stanton.60@osu.edu

Michelle Treber treber.1@osu.edu

Kathy Tutt tutt.19@osu.edu

2020 Garden Call-In Show

As COVID-19 shut down early springtime opportunities to meet in person, OSU Extension Lucas County is fortunate to partner with other community organizations to offer information and support to gardeners. The Ebeid Institute, Urban Agriculture Alliance of Lucas County, and The Arts Commission are offering monthly garden call-in shows along with OSU Extension, Lucas.

The call-in show is on the second Tuesday of the month at 1:00 pm. Please follow these steps to join the call. Dial 1-512-626-6799. Enter 942-8492-0361. Press #. See below for the flyers and themes of upcoming and previous monthly calls.

For any questions about “how-to” garden (or about the Garden Call-In Show) please email lucascountymastergardener@gmail.com or call the Horticulture Hotline at 419-578-6783 (Monday and Wednesday 10 am – 1 pm)

To share this information with others: go.osu.edu/gardencall

Lucas Co Hort Hotline


August 11th – Fall Victory Gardening

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victory Gardens – Let’s Grow Ohio #OhioVictoryGardens  u.osu.edu/OhioVictoryGardens/


July 14th – Fall Vegetable Gardening

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit here for charts on dates to plant fall vegetable seeds


June 9th – Gardening as a Self-Care Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gardening As Self Care Practice – Handout

Gardening as a Self-Care Practice, Live Smart Ohio Blog Post (06/18/20)


May 12, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guide to Growing Your Own Food, 2020 by Urban Agriculture Alliance (UAA) of Lucas County

Garden Call-in Show, May Call In agenda, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guidance for Community Gardens, COVID-19

 

Ten Tips for Gardening with Children

  1. Start small. It’s OK to dream big and start small. Whether you grow in containers, in a school or community garden or in your front or back yard, make the best choices for you and your family’s growing space, interest and goals.
  2. Learn about plants. If you are new to gardening, or it’s been a few years, review some basic plant science. At the very minimum, all plants need light (sun), water (approximately an inch a week from rain or supplied by the gardener) and nutrients (from a healthy soil). For your benefit, learn about the plants you would like to grow, including knowing potential challenges and possible solutions. Know your local resources like the Horticulture Hotline for Lucas County. Keep safety in mind. This is always important but especially with young children who are inclined to “explore” by putting things in their mouth.
  1. Keep it simple! You don’t have to be an expert on gardening. Just like doing other new things with children, you get to learn together. If they have a question, talk it through and discover the answer. Use the resources listed above, children’s books and youth garden websites
  2. Decide on plants. What plants to grow? Gardens are as diverse as the people who grow them! You can grow whatever will work in your space and your kitchen. When gardening with youth, consider growing some radishes, sunflowers, cherry tomatoes and mini-gourds. Why? Radishes grow fast. Even if you or your kiddos don’t love radishes, they are one of the first vegetables to harvest. Sunflowers are bright and tall (or chose a small variety for smaller spaces) and edible! Miniatures like cherry tomatoes (for an easy snack) and mini-gourds (for fall decoration and crafts) are fun because they grow plentiful and are just the right size for smaller hands.
  3. Up-cycle household items for garden tools and supplies. Use kid-sized tools for planting and digging. Even spoons will work well when held in small hands. Before sending common household items to the recycling center, consider up-cycling them into garden tools. An empty milk jug can become a watering can or cut into a scoop for garden soil. Plastic knives can be used as plant labels and stuck in the ground.
  4. Keep chore time short. Make a game of weeding, or limit to five minutes. Watering (or water play) is usually the fun part of gardening, especially in the hot summer!
  5. Let them play. Follow their lead. If they’d rather play in the soil or look at bugs than pull weeds, it’s OK. They are still learning while playing.
  6. Let them have growing space. Give children their own spot or container to garden and let them grow their own way. A preschooler may want to plant and re-plant, dig and explore similar to a sandbox. Include containers with pebbles, sticks, seeds, small tools, and other garden-related items to explore. Set up a Mud Kitchen with bowls, buckets and plastic kitchen tools. For elementary-aged children, take a 4-H garden project or use a small space to create a miniature garden such as fairy garden or dinosaur garden.  In large garden spaces, create a play space by planting a Sunflower House and Beanpole Tepee. It is helpful to mulch wide paths to define the walking and playing space from the garden growing area. Add benches or straw bales for seating.
  7. Enjoy! Enjoy yourself and your fresh produce. It’s a great time to explore and learn together, reconnect with nature, observe daily changes and growth and prepare new recipes.
  8. Share your garden story and share your extra produce. Use social media to post your garden pictures, sneak a zucchini on your neighbor’s porch on August 8th and consider donating extra produce to a local emergency food pantry.

Links:

Planting A Fall Vegetable Garden

Planting a fall vegetable garden is a great way to extend the growing season and enjoy some cool weather crops after the heat of the summer fades away. Some vegetables love cooler weather!

It’s important to know about the average number of days to harvest for each crop,  the cold temperature tolerance of vegetables, and the average anticipated date of the first frost in your area (around October 15th for Northwest Ohio). If you have questions from an online presentation, please contact Amy Stone stone.91@osu.edu or Patrice Powers-Barker powers-barker.1@osu.edu  (information updated summer 2020 – thanks going out to Pam Bennett and Carri Jagger for their assistance on garden content).

Fall Vegetable Garden Charts

The following charts give general information on when to plant vegetable seeds for a fall garden harvest in Ohio:

PowerPoint Slides for 2020 Fall Vegetable Garden lesson


OSU Extension Resources related to gardening and vegetables:


Additional Resources

The following blogs and factsheets are from neighboring states and share additional information about fall vegetable gardens. Note for Ohio growers, the seasonal calendar dates will be different for different growing zones so take that into consideration when reading recommended planting and harvesting dates from other areas.


References

Cool Season Crops, (2020), Seed Savers Exchange, Retrieved from https://www.seedsavers.org/cool-season-plants

Durham, R., Strang, J., Williams, M., Wright, S., Bessin, R., Lee, B., Pfeufer, E. (2019). Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky. Retrieved from http://www2.ca.uky.edu/agcomm/pubs/id/id128/id128.pdf

Gardening in small spaces, bulletin #2761, University of Maine Cooperative Extension, Retrieved from https://extension.umaine.edu/publications/2761e/

Jonael. (2017). Growing fresh cilantro in your garden or small farm. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and University of Florida. Retrieved 06/23/20 from http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/hardeeco/2017/10/26/growing-fresh-cilantro-garden-small-farm/

Lerner, R. (2020). Versatile vegetables for fall gardening. Purdue Agriculture. Retrieved from https://www.purdue.edu/hla/sites/yardandgarden/versatile-vegetables-for-fall-gardening/

Lilley, J., (2017 April 20). Succession planting. University of Maine Extension. Retrieved from https://extension.umaine.edu/cumberland/2017/04/20/succession-planting/

Planning for the garden. (no date). Ohio State University Extension, Excerpted from OSU Extension Bulletin 287 Home Vegetable Gardening, (1991, out of print) Utzinger, Brooks and Wittmeyer. Retrieved from https://wayne.osu.edu/sites/wayne/files/imce/Program_Pages/ANR/Garden/Planning%20and%20Planting%20%20the%20Garden.pdf

Ulry, L. (2019). Growing with the seasons. 4-H 692. Ohio State University Extension. https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/growing-with-the-seasons/

Voyle, G. (2012).  Fall vegetable crops for your garden. Michigan State University Extension. Retrieved from https://www.canr.msu.edu/uploads/files/E3172_-_Fall_Vegetable_Plants_for_your_Garden.pdf

When to Plant Vegetables: The Garden Planting Calendar (2020). The National Garden Association. Retrieved from https://garden.org/apps/calendar/