Pattern & Scale

For this project we turned the design from one of our previous patterns into 3D models. Specifically, one had to focus on depth and the other on volume.  To do this, we had to layer Bristol paper to create the effects that we wanted. The specific requirements were to…

  • Develop and communicate ideas through iteration as a tool to articulate and analyze intent
  • Develop constraints for design solutions
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the elements and principles of design through 3D work
  • Participate in self assessment, class discussion, and critiques to develop confident evaluative communication skills

 

Starting Out/Iterations

I remember feeling very lost at the beginning of this project. I think my iterations express my confusion and uncertainty about what was expected of us. A lot of the ideas I had were so complex that they really only made sense in my head, so I started just writing out my ideas in words. Throughout the rest of my year, this method would prove to be very helpful. Anyway, here are my initial iterations/sketches…

Revisions

After from feedback from my peers and professors, I realized that I had good parts of ideas that could be combined to make overall better concepts. After that realization, I mixed and matched some of my sketches and came up with these improved sketches. The left drawing is an idea for representing depth, and the right one is for volume. The idea behind the depth one is that the design will be cut out in concentric circle layers that increase in surface area as you move towards the middle. The idea behind the volume one is that it’s kind of like a star shaped bowl where the actual parts of the design are built up in size as you move towards the middle. Here they are…

After these ideas were approved, I had to start thinking about how I was actually going to create these. I am very lucky that I brought my Cricut cutting machine to college because without it, this project would have been even more difficult than it already was. I had to plan out every single layer to be cut out for each design, here’s what that looked like (depth is first, volume is second)…

As you can see, that was a LOT of layers. For depth, the actual construction wasn’t horrible since there were just 12 layers. I added space in between each layer to give it even more depth, lined them all up so that the design matched on every layer, and then glued it all together on a piece of wood. For volume, the construction process was much more tedious. Once I had the hundreds of layers cut out, I had to glue them together. The outside perimeter alone was almost 100 layers of Bristol, but thankfully the amount of layers for other pieces only decreased from there. Since I am such a perfectionist, the gluing process for the volume model took over 13 hours. You’ll be able to see all of those layers here in the photos (first will be depth, second will be volume)…

What I Learned

From this project, I learned that it pays off to work hard. By far, this was my most time consuming project to date and I also think that it was my best! I tried really hard to think out of the box while still representing depth and volume accurately. I definitely accomplished what I wanted and was very happy with the end results. I also learned that it’s really helpful to use all of your resources because without my Cricut, my work time probably would have doubled!