Bio and Renewable Diesel Energy What the Future Holds Webinar

The OSU Extension Energy Outreach team will put on a program on renewable diesel energy on Sep 26, in lieu of our monthly meeting.  Please see the attached flyer for the link.

Join speakers from Ohio State University Extension, Clean Fuels Alliance America, Benchmark Biodiesel, and the Ohio Soybean Council to learn more about current trends in the soybean biodiesel market. Questions- Email: Dan Lima: lima.19@osu.edu or Gwynn Stewart: stewart.1818@osu.edu

DATE: Sept. 26, 2023

TIME:10:00 a.m.- 11:30 a.m.

To register: https://go.osu.edu/biodiesel

The virtual panel will include:

  1. Kirk Merritt from the Ohio Soybean Council
  2. Tom Verry from Clean Fuels Alliance America (formerly the National Biodiesel Association)
  3. Seungki Lee from OSU College of Food Agriculture and Environmental Science (Ag Economist)
  4. Page Tohorson from Benchmark Biodiesel- Private sector

The goal is to introduce the Bio/Renewable diesel market to the public/farmer.  We hope to highlight the market potential of this fuel for not only the public but the soybean producer as well.

Sincerely,

The OSU Extension Energy Outreach Team

Soybean Diseases Are Showing Up in Ohio

By: Horacio Lopez-Nicora, Stephanie Karhoff, CCA

Source: https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-28/soybean-diseases-are-showing-ohio
In early August, we recommended starting scouting fields for soybean diseases. At that time (two weeks ago), disease incidence across Ohio was very low to moderate. Conducive environmental conditions, however, are turning things around and more fields are developing disease symptoms.

Figure 1. Soybean field in southern Ohio are severely affected by sudden death syndrome (SDS) with premature defoliation in the R5/R6 growth stage (A); symptoms begin with interveinal yellowing (chlorosis) of a leaf (B); eventually, leaf tissue dies and becomes brown but veins remain green (C). The fungus infects the root and produces toxins that are responsible for the above-ground symptoms.

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)

We are finding fields in Ohio severely affected by sudden death syndrome (SDS) [Fig.1 and Fig. 2]. SDS is caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. This species is the most prevalent in the region, however, other Fusarium species can cause SDS. SDS above-ground symptoms can be confused with those produced by a different fungus (Cadophora gregata) that causes brown stem rot (BSR). To distinguish SDS from BSR, symptomatic plants should be dug out and stem cut open longitudinally. SDS-infected plants have white, healthy-looking pith, while BSR-infected plants present brown discoloration of the pith. Moreover, fields with severe SDS symptoms can also have high levels of soybean cyst nematode (SCN). Visit here for more information on SDS.

Continue reading

Soybean Farmers Invited to Participate in Survey

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County & David Marrison, Extension Educator, ANR, Coshocton County

Dr. Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois, and Dr. Carl Zulauf, Emeritus Professor, The Ohio State University, are conducting an online survey of soybean growers in nine soybean-producing states, including Ohio. The nine states represent 75% of U.S. soybean production.

The researchers intend to measure the impact of each communication channel – mass media, social media, and interpersonal meetings – on farmers’ decision-making to adopt new digital technology. This survey is focused on soybean producers in these states: Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, and North Dakota. The results will support new research and contribute in a practical way to increase knowledge about the most efficient communication channels for the dissemination of digital agriculture technologies.

The survey takes approximately five minutes to complete, and all data will be kept confidential.  If interested, you can provide your email address to receive a copy of the final survey results.

If you are interested in participating in this survey, please click here: https://go.illinois.edu/farmdocsurvey

Soybean Vegetative Growth Stages- VC vs V1

Article by Laura Lindsey

Stage VC - Definition: Fehr and Caviness (1977)- Unifoliolate leaves sufficiently unrolled, so the leaf edges are not touching Pederson (2009)- Unifoliolate leaves unrolled sufficiently, so the leaf edges are not touching

Stage VC – Definition: Fehr and Caviness (1977)- Unifoliolate leaves sufficiently unrolled, so the leaf edges are not touching Pederson (2009)- Unifoliolate leaves unrolled sufficiently, so the leaf edges are not touching

Across the state, soybean growth and development is variable, ranging from early vegetative stages to flowering. However, there has been some confusion regarding the identification of the VC and V1 growth stages. This confusion is mostly due to two definitions of V1…that actually mean the same thing. The Fehr and Caviness Method (1977) is based on the number of nodes that have a fully developed leaf, whereas Pederson (2009) focuses more on leaf unrolling so that the leaf edges are no longer touching. The VC definition for both methods is the same, but the differences start to appear between the methods at V1. Fehr and Caviness define V1 as “fully developed leaves at unifoliolate nodes,” which also means that there is “one set of unfolded trifoliolate leaves unrolled sufficiently, so the leaf edges are not touching.” This second definition is common in extension publications (Pedersen, 2009). Continue reading