ANR PROGRAMMING NEWSLETTER: WEEK OF OCTOBER 18, 2021

MONDAY, OCTOBER 18

Certified Crop Advisor Exam Study Course  All Day, Oct. 1, 2021 – Feb. 15, 2022

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19

Certified Crop Advisor Exam Study Course  All Day, Oct. 1, 2021 – Feb. 15, 2022

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20

Certified Crop Advisor Exam Study Course  All Day, Oct. 1, 2021 – Feb. 15, 2022

Southern Ohio Farm Show (Virtual) 10:00 am to 11:00 am

Farm Office Live!  Wednesday, October 20, 2021, 07:00pm  to  09:00pm

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21

Certified Crop Advisor Exam Study Course  All Day, Oct. 1, 2021 – Feb. 15, 2022

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22

Certified Crop Advisor Exam Study Course  All Day, Oct. 1, 2021 – Feb. 15, 2022

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23

Certified Crop Advisor Exam Study Course  All Day, Oct. 1, 2021 – Feb. 15, 2022

OSU Income Tax Schools 2021

OSU Extension Announces Two-Day Tax Schools for Tax Practitioners & Agricultural & Natural Resources Income Tax Issues Webinar


Barry Ward & Julie Strawser, OSU Income Tax Schools

Dealing with the tax provisions of the COVID-related legislation for both individuals and businesses are among the topics to be discussed during the upcoming Tax School workshop series offered throughout Ohio in November and December.

“The annual series is designed to help tax preparers learn about federal tax law changes and updates for this year as well as learn more about issues they may encounter when filing individual and small business 2021 tax returns,” said Barry Ward, Director of the Ohio State University Income Tax School Program.

“The tax schools are intermediate-level courses that focus on interpreting tax regulations and changes in tax laws to help tax preparers, accountants, financial planners, and attorneys advise their clients,” he said. The schools offer continuing education credit for certified public accountants, enrolled agents, attorneys, annual filing season preparers, and certified financial planners. Continue reading

Delayed Wheat Planting

By:  Laura Lindsey

In general, the best time to plant wheat is the 10-day period starting the day after the fly-free safe date. When wheat is planted more than 10-days after the fly-free safe date, there is an increased chance of reduced fall growth and reduced winterhardiness. The effect of planting date on wheat yield is shown in Figure 6-2 of the Ohio Agronomy Guide. A free pdf of the guide is available by clicking here: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/wheat-production/ohio-agronomy-guide-15th-edition (Download the pdf by clicking on the picture of the guide.) Currently, with funding from Ohio Corn and Wheat, we are re-examining the effect of wheat planting date…so stayed tuned next year for those results.

When wheat is planted 3-4 weeks after the fly-free-safe date, the same yield can be achieved as earlier planted wheat if freezing weather does not occur until late November or early December. However, a higher seeding rate is recommended. For wheat planted 3-4 weeks after the fly-free-safe date, use a seeding rate of 1.6 to 2.0 million seeds per acre. The actual number of seeds per pound and germination rate is important for determining the correct seeding rate and drill calibration (Table 1). There are fewer seeds per pound of large seeds than pounds of small seeds. The number of seeds per pound can be found on the seed bag.

Additionally, late planting also means plants will be smaller than normal when entering dormancy and have smaller, more shallow root systems, making them more susceptible to heaving next March. The best heaving control is to get the seed placed between 1.0 and 1.5 inches deep when planting and to plant no-till. These two practices combined will reduce heaving potential.

Table 1. Pounds of seed needed to plant from 1.2 to 2.0 million seeds/acre with seeds of varying sizes.

Next Farm Office Live is October 15

Join OSU Extension Faculty and Staff on Friday, October 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. as we discuss current farm management and legislation issues.

Details and registration link are available at https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive.  Below are this week’s topics:

  • Introducing…..Seungki Lee,  new Ag Economist
  • Federal Legislative Update
  • Farm Tax Implications from Federal Legislative Proposals
  • State Legislative Update
  • Ohio Farm Business Analysis 2020: Costs & returns for corn, soybeans, and wheat
  • Crop Costs and Margins for 2022
  • Farm Office Program Updates
  • Panel Discussion: Considerations for End of Year Tax Planning with returning Special Guest Robert Moore, Esq.
  • Q&A

We hope to see you at this virtual session!

New Solar and Wind Laws went into effect on 10/11/2021

By Peggy Hall, OSU Extension Educational Lawyer

Monday marked the effective date for new laws in Ohio addressing utility-scale solar and wind facilities.  As a result of Senate Bill 52, the new laws expand local involvement in the siting and approval of these facilities, as follows:

  • County commissioners may designate “restricted areas” where such facilities may not locate.
  • County citizens may petition for a referendum to approve or reject restricted area designations.
  • Developers must hold a public meeting overviewing a proposed facility in the county where it would locate.
  • County commissioners may prohibit or limit a proposed wind or solar facility after learning of it at the public meeting.
  • County and township representatives must sit on the Ohio Power Siting Board committee that reviews facility applications.

The new laws also require wind and solar developers to submit decommissioning plans and performance bonds to address the removal of a facility at the end of its lifetime.

To help explain the laws, Eric Romich and I have developed the law bulletins and videos you see below.  We also have a podcast that Amanda Douridas and Elizabeth Hawkins recorded with us.  You’ll find all resources on the Farm Office website at go.osu.edu/energylaw.   Also on that page are the Farmland Owner’s Guide to Solar Leasing and our Solar Leasing Checklist.

 

Ohio SB52 that revises law governing wind farms and solar facilities in Ohio Webinar on September 28 at 10:00 AM

The OSU Extension Energy Outreach group would like to invite you to our monthly seminar:

Join the Sept. 28 program hosted by The Ohio State University Extension Energy Program on Ohio SB52 that revises law governing wind farms and solar facilities in Ohio. The program will start at 10:00 AM.

Link to register and join: https://osu.zoom.us/j/94645173927?pwd=ZnY3ZyttdDhZemsxeU52aHBtSUZYQT09

Meeting ID: 946 4517 3927

Password: 920502

By Phone: 1-312-626-6799,,94645173927#,0# 920502#

The presentation will be from Peggy Kirk Hall, Associate Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law Director, OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program in the College of Food, Agricultural & Environmental Sciences Department of Extension.

SB52 Flyer 9-28-21.  Hope to see some new faces at our meeting!

For Questions contact: Dan Lima
Extension Educator, Agriculture, and Natural Resources
Ohio State University Extension Belmont County
101 North Market St., Suite A, St. Clairsville, OH 43950
(740) 695-1455 Office
belmont.osu.edu

Foliar Diseases May Affect Stalk Strength and Quality

By Pierce Paul, OSU Extension

Causes of Stalk Rot: Several factors may contribute to stalk rot, including extreme weather conditions, inadequate fertilization, problems with nutrient uptake, insects, and diseases. This year, the combined effects of prevalent diseases such as northern corn leaf blight, southern rust, tar spot, and gray leaf spot may negatively affect stalk quality. However, the extent of the problem will depend on when these diseases develop and how badly the upper leaves of the plant are damaged. When leaves above the ear are severely damaged well before grain-fill is complete, the plants often translocate sugars from the stalk to fill grain, causing them to become weak and predisposed to fungal infection. A number of fungal pathogens cause stalk rot, but the three most important in Ohio are Gibberella, Collectotrichum (anthracnose), and Fusarium.

Checking for Stalk Rot: Symptom common to all stalk rots are deterioration and discoloration of the inner stalk tissues. Consequently, you can use the “squeeze test” or the “pinch test” to assess stalk rot and the potential for lodging without having to remove plants and split the stalks. Bend down and squeeze or pinch the internode of the stalk about 6-8 inches above the ground between the thumb and forefinger. If the inner node is easily compressed or collapses under pressure, you will likely have some type of stalk rot. The “push” test is another way to assess stalk rot and the risk for lodging. Gently push the stalks at the ear level, 6 to 8 inches from the vertical. If the stalk breaks between the ear and the lowest node, stalk rot is usually present. Stalk rot severity may vary from field to field and from one hybrid to another.

Consequences of Stalk Rot: Stalk rots may cause lodging, especially if the affected crop is not harvested promptly. On lodged plants, the ear on or close to the ground may develop ear rots and become contaminated with mycotoxins. In addition, lodging may lead to grain yield losses and slowdown the harvest operation.  However, it is not uncommon to walk corn fields where nearly every plant is upright yet nearly every plant is also showing stalk rot symptoms. Many hybrids have excellent rind strength, which contributes to plant standability even when the internal plant tissue is rotted or beginning to rot. However, strong rinds will not prevent lodging, especially if harvest is delayed and the crop is subjected to strong winds and heavy rains. To minimize these problems, harvest promptly after physiological maturity, even if you have to do so at a slightly higher moisture content (moisture in the lower 20s).

Full Steam Ahead! What I have been up to the last few weeks.

I just wanted to take this time to give you a few updates. I am so thankful to live and work in such a wonderful community. I heard someone say if you love what you do you will never feel like you are working a day in your life. I sure do love this job.

  1. Our office is now back in full swing after our remodel project. You will see a new facelift to the office. Stop in and meet our newest staff member, Tyanna Erford. Tyanna primarily works with our 4-H/Youth Development and Family and Consumer Sciences program but is an additional office associate and back-up to answer questions if Katie Gorrell is not in the office.
  2. The last few weeks are flying by with the start of school and the start of harvest (silage so far). I have been busy wrapping up research projects, scouting homes and fields, and collecting data.  Additionally, I am back on the road training for the upcoming year in the areas of Farm Business Management, Rural Health/Farm Stress, and Agronomy topics. Finally, I am using up vacation time that I will lose with my upcoming work anniversary date of October 21. My office tells me I am out of the office right now more than I am in the office but our county has need my services outside the office. Continue reading

Farm Science Review Tickets Still Available until Monday

Picture courtesy of Farm Science Review

There is still time until Monday to get tickets. The 59th annual Farm Science Review is set for September 21-23 at Ohio State’s Molly Caren Agricultural Center, 135 State Route 38, near London. The full program is located at https://fsr.osu.edu/sites/fsr/files/imce/Information/FSR%202021%20Full%20Program%20with%20Maps%20Gatefold.pdf 

Featured at the event will be more than 100 educational sessions, including “Ask the Expert” talks; 600 exhibits; the most comprehensive field crop demonstrations in the United States; a career exploration fair; and immersive virtual reality videos of agricultural activities.

This year’s Farm Science Review will also feature a new online component called “Farm Science Review Live.”

Hours for Farm Science Review are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 21–22 and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 23.

Tickets are available at our office, $7 each. Either cash or check payable to OSU Extension Paulding County is accepted. Tickets are $10 at the gate. Ages 5 and under are free admittance. Currently, the Paulding County Office is back in our offices after our remodel. You will see a new facelift in the office. Please ask Katie for tickets.

Ohio Sheep Day

The Ohio State University Department of Animal Sciences and Ohio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) are excited to announce that the 2021 Ohio Sheep Day will be held live, in-person on Saturday, October 2nd at the OARDC Small Ruminant Center located at 5651 Fredericksburg Road, Wooster, OH 44691. This year’s program will offer attendees the opportunity to visit one of Ohio State’s research stations that focuses on efficient ruminant livestock and forage production. Continue reading

Tar Spot confirmed in Paulding County

Tar Spot was confirmed in Paulding County on September 7, 2021.

This week Tar Spot was confirmed in a cornfield in Paulding County. Below is a picture of what to look for when scouting for Tar Spot.  For more information on Tar Spot please see the links:

  1. https://crop-protection-network.s3.amazonaws.com/publications/tar-spot-filename-2019-03-25-120313.pdf 
  2. https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/22-2021/tar-spot-showing-early-year-note-diagnosis
  3. https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2021-30/tar-spot-more-widespread-cross-state-ohio-2021

Thanks,

Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2020-21

Thursday, August 26th, 2021
Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management

Ohio cropland varies significantly in its production capabilities and, consequently, cropland values and cash rents vary widely throughout the state. Generally, western Ohio cropland values and cash rents differ from much of southern and eastern Ohio cropland values and cash rents. The primary factors affecting these values and rents are land productivity and potential crop return, and the variability of those crop returns. Soils, fertility, and drainage/irrigation capabilities are primary factors that most influence land productivity, crop return and variability of those crop returns.

Other factors impacting land values and cash rents may include field size and shape, field accessibility, market access, local market prices, field perimeter characteristics and potential for wildlife damage, buildings and grain storage, previous tillage system and crops, tolerant/resistant weed populations, USDA Program Yields, population density, and competition for the cropland in a region. Factors specific to cash rental rates may include services provided by the operator and specific conditions of the lease.

The Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents study was conducted from January through April in 2021. The opinion-based study surveyed professionals with a knowledge of Ohio’s cropland values and rental rates. Professionals surveyed were rural appraisers, agricultural lenders, professional farm managers, ag business professionals, OSU Extension educators, farmers, landowners, and Farm Service Agency personnel.

The study results are based on 94 surveys. Respondents were asked to group their estimates based on three land quality classes: average, top, and poor. Within each land-quality class, respondents were asked to estimate average corn and soybean yields for a five-year period based on typical farming practices. Survey respondents were also asked to estimate current bare cropland values and cash rents negotiated in the current or recent year for each land-quality class. Survey results are summarized below for western Ohio with regional summaries (subsets of western Ohio) for northwest Ohio and southwest Ohio.

According to the Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, cropland values in western Ohio are expected to increase in 2021 by 3.8 to 5.3 percent depending on the region and land class. Cash rents are expected to increase from 3.6 to 3.9 percent depending on the region and land class.

For the complete survey research summary go to the OSU Extension Farm Office website at:

https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-management-tools/farm-management-publications/cash-rents

Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2020-21

Grain Fill Stages In Corn

Please note: While many of the Corn Growth Stages are passed for Paulding County in the article from Bob Neilson, I received a few calls on later stage Corn Growth stages. The article below had some great comparison pictures. 

DATE: AUGUST 18, 2021 – INCLUDED IN ISSUE:

A stress-free grain fill period can maximize the yield potential of a crop, while severe stress during grain fill can cause kernel abortion or lightweight grain and encourage the development of stalk rot. The health of the upper leaf canopy is particularly important for achieving maximum grain filling capacity. Some research indicates that the upper leaf canopy, from the ear leaf to the uppermost leaf, is responsible for no less than 60% of the photosynthate necessary for filling the grain.

Kernel development proceeds through several distinct stages that were originally described by Hanway (1971) and most recently by Abendroth et al. (2011). As with leaf staging protocols, the kernel growth stage for an entire field is defined when at least 50% of the plants in a field have reached that stage.

Delayed planting of corn decreases the apparent thermal time (GDDs) required between planting and physiological maturity (Nielsen, 2019). A large proportion of that decrease occurs during grain filling and may be partially related to shorter and cooler days in late September and October that naturally slow photosynthesis and encourage plant senescence.

Silking Stage (Growth Stage R1)

Silk emergence is technically the first recognized stage of the reproductive period. Every ovule (potential kernel) on the ear develops its own silk (the functional stigma of the female flower). Silks begin to elongate soon after the V12 leaf stage (12 leaves with visible leaf collars), beginning with the ovules near the base of the cob and then sequentially up the cob, with the tip ovules silking last. Consequently, the silks from the base half of the ear are typically the first to emerge from the husk leaves. Turgor pressure “fuels” the elongation of the silks and so severe drought stress often delays silk elongation and emergence from the husk leaves. Silks elongate about 1.5 inches per day during the first few days after they emerge from the husk leaves. Silks continue to elongate until pollen grains are captured and germinate or until they simply deteriorate with age.

Silks remain receptive to pollen grain germination for up to 10 days after silk emergence (Nielsen, 2020b), but deteriorate quickly after about the first 5 days of emergence. Natural senescence of silk tissue over time results in collapsed tissue that restricts continued growth of the pollen tube. Silk emergence usually occurs in close synchrony with pollen shed (Nielsen, 2020c), so that duration of silk receptivity is normally not a concern. Failure of silks to emerge in the first place (for example, in response to silkballing or severe drought stress) does not bode well for successful pollination.

Pollen grains “captured” by silks quickly germinate and develop pollen tubes that penetrate the silk tissue and elongate to the ovule within about 24 hours. The pollen tubes contain the male gametes that eventually fertilize the ovules. Within about 24 hours or so after successfully fertilizing an ovule, the attached silk deteriorates at the base, collapses, and drops away. This fact can be used to determine fertilization success before visible kernel development occurs (Nielsen, 2016).

 

Silk appearance at R1

Closeup of ovules and R1

Continue reading

Will a Second Fungicide be Worth the Cost for Tar Spot Management?

Please note: While I have not observed Tar spot in Paulding County, we have had many reports of Tar spot in Hardin and Hancock Counties, and in previous years in Fulton County. Please contact Sarah Noggle if you believe you have Tar spot.  

CPN 2018. Published August 19, 2021. DOI: doi.org/10.31274/cpn-20210820-1

By:  Darcy Telenko, Purdue University; Martin Chilvers, Michigan State University; Alison Robertson, Iowa State University; Albert Tenuta, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs; and Damon Smith, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Tar spot has quickly become a widespread concern on corn this season (2021) across much of the upper Midwest U.S. and portions of Ontario, Canada. This is especially concerning after reasonably localized epidemics resulted in low or no yield reductions over the past two seasons. This season the tar spot fungus has infected corn plants early and is rapidly increasing in many areas of the upper Midwest corn belt. The speed at which the epidemic is now moving and the crop growth stage across much of these acres (ranging from tassel to early dough) has resulted in questions about what in-season management approaches might provide an economic benefit.

Characteristic tar spot signs on a corn leaf. Image: Darcy Telenko

When is the best time to apply a fungicide for tar spot management?

Like most of the other diseases of corn, the timing of fungicide application to hedge your bets against tar spot generally is at tasseling (VT) to the silking (R1) growth stage. Recent regional research has demonstrated that while there might be little yield benefit with an application at the V6 growth stage, a single application of fungicide at VT-R1 on average can result in as much as 7 bushels or more yield compared to not treating. This is compared to just 2-3 bushels at the V6 timing and suggests that farmers are more likely to recover their fungicide costs if applying just one application at VT-R1. In the absence of tar spot and southern rust, spraying at V6 AND VT-R1 also has not resulted in economically positive returns. This practice, on average only results in an additional 1 bushel of yield compared to one application at VT-R1. There is no considerable return on investment (ROI) with two-pass fungicide programs for many corn diseases. But what about the tar spot situation this season? What do the data say about a second fungicide application to manage tar spot if I have already sprayed at VT-R1 and the disease is continuing to increase?

Continue reading

Remember soybean aphids? They might be in your fields

By:  Andy Michel and Kelley Tilmon

Note for Paulding County growers:  If you suspect soybean aphids in your field, please call ANR Educator Sarah Noggle at 419-399-8225 with field location and soybean variety to have your field scouted and aphid sample taken for research purposes.

Soybean aphids have always been around Ohio, but it has been a while since we have had many fields with high populations.  Based on recent scouting, we have noticed increasing populations of soybean aphids.  As we go into the critical growth stage of soybean, this is also the most important time to check your fields for soybean aphids and see if you have exceeded the threshold of an increasing population of 250 aphids per plant.

To scout for soybean aphids, walk at least 100 ft from the field edge and count the number of aphids from 5 plants in 10 different locations.  If your average is greater than 250 per plant, you’ll need to come back and re-scout 3-4 days later.  If the aphid population increased in that time, an insecticide application is recommended.  Keep in mind that to accurately determine the threshold, scouting should be performed at least weekly and multiple times a week if aphids are active in fields.

Soybean aphids can cause yield loss up to the late R5 to early R6 growth stage. If an application is necessary, there are several effective insecticides available.  Although some soybean aphid populations in the western corn belt are resistant to pyrethroids, we have not seen any evidence of this in Ohio.  If you make a pyrethroid application and suspect resistance, contact us, Andy Michel or Kelley Tilmon (michel.70@osu.edutilmon.1@osu.edu) or your local extension educator.

Ohio Landowner/Hunter Access Partnership Program

Information provided by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources

Image: Ohio Department of Natural Resources

The Ohio Landowner/Hunter Access Partnership (OLHAP) Program is a new way for Ohio hunters to get access to private properties. This program is funded in part by the federal Farm Bill under their Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program (VPA-HIP). This bill provides funding to state and tribal agencies through a competitive grant process to implement programs encouraging hunting access on private properties. As part of the 2018 Farm Bill, Ohio was awarded $1,831,500 to implement the new OLHAP program. The OLHAP program uses part of those funds to pay landowners for hunters to access their property. Participating landowners receive annual payment rates ranging from $2.00 to $30.00 per acre depending on the characteristics of the property enrolled. Enrollment contracts are for 2-3 years, with the possibility of extension.

If you are a landowner interested in finding out more about the program or wishing to enroll your property, please complete the form at https://ohiodnr.gov/wps/portal/gov/odnr/buy-and-apply/hunting-fishing-boating/hunting-resources/ohio-landowner-hunter-access with your contact information. An OLHAP program representative will be in contact with you to provide more resources.

Check out the new Michigan State/Ohio State Field Crops Insect Pest Management Guide

Press Release from Chris DiFonzo (Michigan State) and Kelley Tilmon (Ohio State)

The newly completed Michigan State/Ohio State Field Crops Insect Pest Management Guide is available for online use and downloads at https://aginsects.osu.edu/sites/aginsects/files/imce/MSU%20-%20OSU%20Insect%20IPM%20Guide.pdf

This publication contains a series of chapters with information on biology, damage, management recommendations, and insecticides related to insect pests in field crops in Michigan and Ohio. Chapters cover field corn, soybean, wheat, and other small grains, alfalfa and grass forage, and (for Michigan growers) dry beans and sugar beet. Each chapter stands alone, focusing on a particular crop.

In the preparation of this guide, we checked state databases and consulted labels for each of the pesticides listed in the crop chapters; we made every effort to include correct information and to list most of the commonly-used products for Michigan and Ohio. However, labels do change over time. Always read the labels of the products you use to reconfirm application rate, precautions, PPE, pre-harvest intervals, and other key pieces of information prior to spraying.

Users are the best source of feedback on this guide. If you see information that is not correct or complete,  please contact us so that we can update the guide accordingly.

Rapid Increase in Ivermectin Prescriptions and Reports of Severe Illness Associated with Use of Products Containing Ivermectin to Prevent or Treat COVID-19

From Center for Disease Control (CDC – Press Release August 26, 2021)

Summary
Ivermectin is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescription medication used to treat certain infections caused by internal and external parasites. When used as prescribed for approved indications, it is generally safe and well-tolerated.During the COVID-19 pandemic, ivermectin dispensing by retail pharmacies has increased, as has the use of veterinary formulations available over the counter but not intended for human use. FDA has cautioned about the potential risks of use for prevention or treatment of COVID-19.

Ivermectin is not authorized or approved by FDA for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel has also determined that there are currently insufficient data to recommend ivermectin for treatment of COVID-19. ClinicalTrials.gov has listings of ongoing clinical trials that might provide more information about these hypothesized uses in the future. Continue reading

Fall armyworms are marching

Fall armyworm damage to a yard in Paulding County. If you are seeing this please contact me. There is a chance the yard will come back with the rains received on Thursday evening.

I have received many phone calls and emails this week about armyworms this week from both farmers and landowners.  I have worked with Curtis Young in Van Wert County to make the positive ID of Fall armyworm.  I have shared some of the pictures of the damage armyworms can do.  I am receiving these calls from around the county.

Fall armyworm in a lawn in Paulding County. The threshold for control is 4 worms per square foot for lawns/homeowners.

Across the US, the Fall armyworm numbers have been much higher than in previous years due to our current weather patterns and the life cycle of Armyworms, there is a chance we could see a third-generation yet this year.  These guys like to feed on the species in the grass family and their “candy” is newly seeded yards (within the last few years), volunteer wheat fields, and newly seeded forages. Additionally, I am linking extra articles with information on control and general question both agronomically and for homeowners. As always, contact me with your questions.

Thanks,

Safety Around Manure Pits

Tragedy struck a farm family in Mercer County when three brothers were killed after entering the manure storage on their dairy farm. This is an unimaginable loss and one that occurs way too often. It is hard to stand by and wait for help when a loved one is unconscious in a dangerous situation but we see time and again how entering to save them often leads to the death of another family member. Please be aware of all the dangers on your farm and inform your family and employees as well. To learn more about manure gasses, read this fact sheet.