Three Extension professionals named as field specialists, Farm Management at Ohio State

COLUMBUS, Ohio–Bruce Clevenger, David Marrison, and Eric Richer have been hired as field specialists in farm management for Ohio State University Extension in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The three new specialists, who previously have served as OSU Extension county educators, will begin their new roles on Nov. 1, said Jacqueline Kirby Wilkins, associate dean, and director, OSU Extension.

“Farm management is an extremely important topic in the agriculture industry, and OSU Extension has determined that the best way to address this top priority is to install several professionals to coordinate their efforts across the state,” Wilkins said. “Bruce, David, and Eric are experts in this field, and each also has a specialized area of interest that will contribute to the industry as a whole and really help meet the needs of our clientele.” Continue reading

Ohio Sheep Tour set for October 15 & October 16.

Sheep looking at the camera in the wooden barn. In the background group of sheep animals standing and eating on the farm.

OSIA_OSU Statewide Sheep Production Tour Flyer

A statewide sheep production tour of Knox, Licking, and Crawford Counties has been planned for Ohio Sheep Producers for the weekend of Saturday, October 15, and Sunday, October 16, 2022. This year’s tour is jointly sponsored by the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association and Hardin County OSU Extension. Join us for a drive your own, sheep production tour focusing on dry lot/confinement sheep operations. There will be four tour stops on this year’s statewide tour, with each farm stop only being offered at the time listed. Continue reading

Paulding County EMA sets Mitigation Dates for Agricultural Aspect of Paulding County

Fire burns stubble on the field.

Hello there,
If you have received this email, it is because your presence is requested to take part in Paulding County’s Pre-Hazard Mitigation Planning Meetings. These meetings in particular will focus on the agricultural aspects of the plan. We will be talking about the impact on the business side of agriculture as well as the family farms. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) requires that each county in the United States have a Pre Hazard Mitigation Plan. The Mitigation Plan allows for local governments to plan for and implement sustainable cost-effective measures designed to reduce the risk to individuals and property from future natural hazards, while also reducing reliance on federal funding for future disasters. Continue reading

Ag Lender Seminar Series – Save the Date

Check out the main site for updates. https://u.osu.edu/aglenderseminars/

2022 Agricultural Lender Seminar

This program is designed to share current information with lenders and enhance the working relationship between OSU Extension and Ag Lenders. The agenda is based on evaluations from previous seminars, and input from lenders and Agricultural Extension Educators on high-priority topics.

Your choice of four locations:

Tuesday, October 18, Ottawa, OH
Thursday, October 20, Urbana, OH
Thursday, October 20, Washington Court House, OH
Friday, October 21, Wooster
, OH
9:00 am—3:00 pm
Cost $75

Featured Speakers/Topics – COMING SOON!

Register Coming Soon!

Feel free to contact OSU Extension Defiance County at 419-782-4771 or clevenger.10@osu.edu

Avian Influenza Press Release from ODA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Bryan Levin, 614.563.6974
bryan.levin@agri.ohio.gov

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (September 6, 2022) – Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) has been detected in a backyard flock in Ashland County and a commercial chicken flock in Defiance County. The positive detections were confirmed by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS). The samples were first tested at the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. Continue reading

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension’s Ohio Women in Agriculture Program announces opportunities to Learn, Grow, Connect, Inspire and Empower at the 2022 Farm Science Review!

Some of the best conversations and discussions have occurred around the family kitchen table. Grab a cup of your favorite beverage, lunch, or snack and join us from our kitchen table or yours to engage in conversations in-person or “virtually” on September 20, 21, and 22, 2022 for “Kitchen Table Conversations” hosted by the Ohio Women in Agriculture of Ohio State University Extension.

These sessions are offered during the Farm Science Review daily from 11:30 AM-12:30 PM. In-person sessions will be located on the north side of the Firebaugh Building at 384 Friday Avenue at our kitchen table. ZOOM session registration is required to participate. Register @ https://go.osu.edu/2022fsrkitchentableconversation

Programs will focus on key topics related to health, marketing, finance, legal, and production for women in agriculture.  Each topic will feature a leading expert and moderators to generate dialogue and empower discussion among participants.  A list of daily topics and leaders is provided below. Continue reading

September Farm Office Live – September 22 @ 10:00 AM

Sept 2022 Farm Office LiveThis season’s Farm Office Live schedule is set! We return on September 22 at 10 am, live from Farm Science Review! Make sure to register for this season’s Farm Office Live by following this link: https://osu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3V84ep3zT6SsKDJ_k_2FQg

Registration does not carry over from year to year. So, if you want to stay up to date with all the latest farm management and ag law issues, make sure to sign up!

2022 to 23 Farm Office Live Flyer

September Farm Office Live Slide

OSU Extension AOSU Extension Announces Two-Day Tax Schools for Tax Practitioners & Agricultural & Natural Resources Income Tax Issues Webinarnnounces Two-Day Tax Schools for Tax Practitioners & Agricultural & Natural Resources Income Tax Issues Webinar

Barry Ward & Jeff Lewis, OSU Income Tax Schools

Columbus, Ohio. Tax provisions related to new legislation as well as continued issues related to COVID-related legislation for both individuals and businesses are among the topics to be discussed during the upcoming Tax School workshop series offered throughout Ohio in October, November, and December.

“The annual series is designed to help tax preparers learn about federal tax law changes and updates for this year as well as learn more about issues they may encounter when filing individual and small business 2022 tax returns,” said Barry Ward, Director of the Ohio State University Income Tax School Program.

“The tax schools are intermediate-level courses that focus on interpreting tax regulations and changes in tax law to help tax preparers, accountants, financial planners, and attorneys advise their clients,” he said. The schools offer continuing education credit for certified public accountants, enrolled agents, attorneys, annual filing season preparers, and certified financial planners.

“Our instructors are what make the difference in our program. Most have been teaching OSU tax schools for over 20 years and make themselves available long after the class to make sure attendees get through the tax filing season,” Ward said.

Continue reading

eBarns- Putting Data in Producers’ Hands

by: Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist
Source: https://u.osu.edu/beef/2022/08/24/ebarns-putting-data-in-producers-hands/
In 1914, the Smith-Lever Act called for the establishment of an Extension program within land grant universities. The Act spells out that Extension is to disseminate “useful and practical information on subjects related to agriculture” and to disseminate reach being conducted at the experiment stations (OARDC here in Ohio). Over the year this “translation” of research has been done in a variety of ways including field days, seminars, one-on-one instruction, and via printed or digital newsletters. Traditionally, faculty who had Extension responsibilities on campus led research efforts, wrote academic journal articles, and then it was up to someone to share and interpret data that was meaningful to clientele in the counties across the state. eBarns, much like Ohio State Extension’s eFields publication does just that, putting the data of applied research into the hands of producers who can then interpret the research to make production decisions. eBarns in new in 2022, focusing on applied livestock, forage, and manure management research across Ohio. The report can be found online at go.osu.edu/ebarns2022. Within the report readers will find forages, dairy, beef, small ruminants, manure nutrients, and swine research projects highlighted and summarized in a user-friendly format. If there are questions regarding a study within the 2022 eBarns report or interest in becoming involved with eBarns efforts in the future contact Garth Ruff at ruff.72@osu.edu.

Soybean Diseases Are Showing Up in Ohio

By: Horacio Lopez-Nicora, Stephanie Karhoff, CCA

Source: https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-28/soybean-diseases-are-showing-ohio
In early August, we recommended starting scouting fields for soybean diseases. At that time (two weeks ago), disease incidence across Ohio was very low to moderate. Conducive environmental conditions, however, are turning things around and more fields are developing disease symptoms.

Figure 1. Soybean field in southern Ohio are severely affected by sudden death syndrome (SDS) with premature defoliation in the R5/R6 growth stage (A); symptoms begin with interveinal yellowing (chlorosis) of a leaf (B); eventually, leaf tissue dies and becomes brown but veins remain green (C). The fungus infects the root and produces toxins that are responsible for the above-ground symptoms.

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)

We are finding fields in Ohio severely affected by sudden death syndrome (SDS) [Fig.1 and Fig. 2]. SDS is caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. This species is the most prevalent in the region, however, other Fusarium species can cause SDS. SDS above-ground symptoms can be confused with those produced by a different fungus (Cadophora gregata) that causes brown stem rot (BSR). To distinguish SDS from BSR, symptomatic plants should be dug out and stem cut open longitudinally. SDS-infected plants have white, healthy-looking pith, while BSR-infected plants present brown discoloration of the pith. Moreover, fields with severe SDS symptoms can also have high levels of soybean cyst nematode (SCN). Visit here for more information on SDS.

Continue reading

Pre-Harvest Herbicide Treatments for Weed Desiccation

Note from Sarah: As a drive the insect scouting loop in Paulding County, I am noticing many fields invested with water hemp which is a great concern in weed control. Other things to make note of are barnyard grass, velvet leaf , marestail and volunteer corn.

By: Mark Loux

Source: https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2022-28/preharvest-herbicide-treatments-weed-desiccation

Waterhemp infestation.

There are plenty of fields with late-season weed problems this year. Weeds that come through the crop canopy late may be small or spindly or sparse enough to be handled easily by a combine. Other fields can benefit from a preharvest herbicide treatment to kill/dissociate weeds, which makes harvesting easier and can reduce weed seed production and foreign matter in harvested grain. Information on preharvest herbicide treatments for field corn and soybeans can be found in the “Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois”, at the end of those crop sections (pages 75 and 146 of the 2022 edition). Products listed for corn include Aim, glyphosate, 2,4-D, and paraquat, and for soybeans include Aim, dicamba, paraquat, glyphosate, and Sharpen. Keep in mind that Aim and Sharpen have relatively narrow spectrums of activity, and will be less effective than the others across a broad range of weed species (i.e. make sure the target weed is something that they actually control). Continue reading

Fair Week was a Hot, But Great Week!

Hello Paulding County! Welcome to summer! Last week’s scorching weather broke for a beautiful weekend and our Jr. Fair exhibitors were thankful for the slight cool down.  Now, the heat and humidity has returned and concerns are popping up about a flash drought. Expect this weather rollercoaster to continue due to our La Nina weather pattern.

Last week, I was able to participate in various Jr. and Sr. Fair activities at the first county fair in Ohio. From speaking to helping in Acres of Fun, the livestock sale, still project awards, livestock shows, taking tickets…. I definitely got my steps in. I am so thankful for all the community support that makes this county fair so successful. Hats off to all those involved via helping hands, sponsorships, volunteering or any little part of the fair. To see the fair results, check out the Paulding County 4-H Blog at Paulding County Fair | Paulding County 4-H Clover Connection (osu.edu)

Poison hemlock has been in bloom across the county and you may also see wild parsnip as well. I have an included a really good information article on this weed in this week’s edition. Also, have included a nice article on a perennial weed- Canada Thistle.

Be safe and hydrated. Have a great week!

Relentless Canada Thistle

By: Christine Gelley, Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Noble County OSU Extension;

Source: https://u.osu.edu/beef/2022/06/22/relentless-canada-thistle/

The time has come for Canada thistle flowers to line the roadways and begin to bud in pastures and hayfields. The lavender-colored aggregate flowers that develop into fluffy seed are one of the most distinguishing characteristics of the plant. They are easy to find blooming from June through August. If it wasn’t such an unpleasant plant to encounter, I might call it pretty. It isn’t poisonous, thank goodness, but it certainly is troublesome. Some animals will tolerate it while grazing, but most will avoid it while it is growing or sort it out of a hay bale. Continue reading

Paulding County Farm Bureau is looking for volunteers to help before, during and after the Paulding County Fair.

The Paulding County Farm Bureau is looking for volunteers for various time slots before, during, and after the Paulding County Fair in 2022. Due to the farming season and weather-related events, there are times the Farm Bureau needs to reach out beyond its board membership. Without volunteers in the community, these activities won’t be able to take place.

The fair runs from Saturday, June 11 to Saturday, June 18. These volunteers are preferably adults or older youth partnering with a parent/guardian. Tasks include helping with selling ice cream in their booth, helping with the Farmer Share Breakfast, helping with the Kids Dream Day event, and set-up and teardown of their building.  Please review the available slots below and click on the button to sign up. https://www.signupgenius.com/go/60b054faaa82da4f94-paulding

Thank you,

Abram Klopfenstein, President of Paulding County Farm Bureau

Jessica Vandenbroek, Organizational Director, Paulding, Putnam, Allen, and Van Wert Farm Bureau

Summer Ag Events in NW Ohio

 

Hi all,

I wanted to share the upcoming events in NW Ohio Extension related to Agriculture to get those events on your calendar. Here is the link https://go.osu.edu/summernwohio22 or you can download the PDF of the newsletter 2022 Summer NW Ohio Newsletter PDF Version. I hope to see you at these summer events.

USDA Video Showcases Key Partnerships Driving Science-Based Conservation in Western Lake Erie Basin

A new USDA video provides a closer look at the collaborative partnerships driving innovative water quality assessment and conservation in the Western Lake Erie Basin. The video, Science-Based Solutions: Leveraging Partnerships to Protect the Western Lake Erie Basin, shows how USDA’s Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) watershed studies in the Western Lake Erie Basin bring researchers, farmers, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations together to develop science-based solutions and strategically place them where they can deliver the greatest conservation benefits.

Under CEAP, a network of researchers, from government agencies to universities, work together to monitor the impact of conservation practices on the landscape. These studies directly inform USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service programs, practices, and planning and ensure that the agency provides technical and financial assistance to landowners to develop and implement impactful conservation plans.

Regional partnerships like those driving conservation efforts in the Western Lake Erie Basin have proven to be effective, as demonstrated by the recently released USDA report, Conservation Practices on Cultivated Cropland: A Comparison of CEAP I and CEAP II Survey Data and Modeling.

CEAP is a multi-agency effort to quantify the environmental effects of conservation practices and programs and develop the science base for managing the agricultural landscape for environmental quality. Project findings will be used to guide USDA conservation policy and program development and help conservationists, farmers and ranchers make more informed conservation decisions.

Northwest Ohio Gardening Day

Join OSU Extension Henry County and the Henry County Master Gardeners for the first-ever Northwest Ohio Gardening Day on Friday, April 29 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Henry County Fairgrounds (821 S. Perry St., Napoleon, OH 43545). This event will be filled with many gardening topics, speakers, and hands-on demonstrations to help get your garden growing and looking great! Lunch will be provided as well as take-home materials.

Presenters include: 

  • Bruce Clevenger, OSUE Defiance County: Planting Trees for Success
  • Amy Stone, OSUE Lucas County: Rain Barrels, Rain Gardens, & More
  • Eric Hite, Four County Career Center: Weeds Diseases & Insects of Trees & Shrubs
  • Reed Johnson, Ohio State University: Backyard Bee Keeping
  • Tom Jenny, OSUE Master Gardener Henry County: Starting Seeds for Your Garden
  • Kenn-Feld / John Deere: Getting the Most From Your Outdoor Power Equipment “Demos included”
Cost: $20, Make Checks Payable to OSU Extension Henry County
Registration Deadline: Wednesday, April 27th, 2022
 
For more information, contact: 
Alan Leininger, ANR Educator Henry County; leininger.17@osu.edu
Sieara Baker, Master Gardener Coordinator Henry County; baker.3270@osu.edu
104 East Washington Street #302 Napoleon, OH 43545-1660 Phone: 419-592-0806

Why Should You Calibrate Your Sprayer Even If it has a Rate Controller?

By:  Erdal Ozkan

Whenever I give a presentation about the need to calibrate a sprayer and how to do it, there is always someone asking me this same question: “I have a rate controller in the cab that regulates the flow rate of the sprayer regardless of the changes in sprayer ground speed. I just enter the gallons per acre application rate, and the controller does the rest, just like cruise control in a car. So, should I still calibrate the sprayer? The answer is, Yes, a calibration should be done. Although the rate controllers do an excellent job of regulating the flow rate of nozzles to keep the application rate constant regardless of the changes in travel speed, a manual calibration at least once a year is needed for two reasons: 1) to ensure the rate controller is functioning properly, 2) the rate controller is not forced to operate outside the pressure operating range for the nozzles on the sprayer boom. Let me elaborate on both points I made and share with you the reasons why a manual calibration of a sprayer is a good idea.

  1. If you are stopped by a police officer for speeding, telling the police officer that the car was in cruise control set to the speed limit will not get you out of getting a ticket. Cruise controls go bad, and so will the rate controllers. That is why it is best to manually check the flow rate of nozzles to make sure the gallons per acre application rate you enter on the controller matches the gallons per acre rate provided by the nozzles.
  2. Your controller may be in good shape, but if the ground speed sensor is giving inaccurate data to the controller, it will not work accurately. For example, if the speed sensor works based on revolutions of the tractor wheels, the ground speed determined may not be accurate, because of the slippage that may occur under some ground conditions. Even the tire pressure being off just a few psi may change the tire revolutions per minute leading to erroneous travel speed readings. Continue reading