OSU Women in Agriculture Goes Virtual at Farm Science Review

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension’s Ohio Women in Agriculture Program announces opportunities to Learn, Grow, Connect, Inspire and Empower at the 2020 Online Farm Science Review!

Are you familiar with one of Ohio’s pioneering women in agriculture and her connection to the Farm Science Review?  As the matriarch of the Farm Science Review, Molly Caren was instrumental in the establishment of the OSU research farm in London, OH. The Molly Caren Agricultural Center plays host to the annual review that attracts over 100,000 visitors each year. As we look at the US Census and NASS (National Agriculture Statistic Service) data, women who own, operate, and produce agricultural products have reached a 1:3 ratio for farmers and ranchers across the country. The same holds true in Ohio with a total number of women farm operators at 43, 256!

Ohio State University Extension’s Ohio Women in Agriculture Program invites all women interested or involved in agriculture to join us around the farm table daily from 11:30 am-12:30 pm for “Kitchen Table Conversations” during the 2020 Virtual Farm Science Review, September 22-24.

Programs will focus on key topics related to health, marketing, finance, legal, and production for women in agriculture.  Each topic will feature a leading expert and moderators to generate dialogue and empower discussion among participants.  A list of daily topics and leaders are provided below. Continue reading

Do your Ears Hang Low? – Premature Ear Declination in Corn

Collapsed ear shank of droopy ear

Collapsed ear shank of droopy ear

Taken from Purdue Extension, Chat and Chew Cafe – September 11, 2020 – Issue 2020.24 – By Bob Nielson

Droopy ears are cute on certain breeds of dogs, but droopy ears on corn plants prior to physiological maturity are a signal that grain fill has slowed or halted. Ears of corn normally remain erect until some time after physiological maturity (black layer development) has occurred, after which the ear shanks eventually collapse and the ears decline or “droop” down. The normal declination of the ears AFTER maturity is desirable from the perspective of shedding rainfall prior to harvest and avoiding the re-wetting of the kernels. PREMATURE ear declination, however, results in premature black layer formation, lightweight grain, and ultimately lower grain yield per acre.

What Causes Premature Droopy Ears? The most common contributing factor is severe drought stress that extends late into the grain-filling period. I have seen droopy ears in quite a few fields around Indiana these past few weeks in areas afflicted with severe drought stress. Even though Indiana has not experienced a lot of excessively hot (≥ 95o F) days in 2020, drought conditions coupled with sunny days and unusually low humidity (i.e., low dew point temperatures) result in significant evapotranspiration demands on the crop during grain filling. In most of the affected fields, the severity of leaf rolling and premature leaf death (senescence) due to drought stress was also high. Continue reading

Supply chain, U.S. trade policy, COVID-19 to be discussed during Farm Science Review

Farm Science Review will hold live online sessions September 22-24. Photo: Getty Images.

LONDON, Ohio—The U.S. trade policy, labor and immigration issues, agricultural commodity markets, and the food supply chain will be among the topics addressed at a panel discussion during the 59th annual Farm Science Review Sept. 22–24 at fsr.osu.edu.

The previously titled Tobin Talk, now The Talk on Friday Avenue, “Value Chains in Food and Agriculture,” on Sept. 22 at 10 a.m. at fsr.osu.edu, will feature comments from a panel of agricultural economists from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The Talk on Friday Avenue is among a series of presentations at Farm Science Review to address topics relevant to the agricultural industry, from controlling weeds and managing beef cattle to reducing safety hazards on the farm and growing plants indoors in water, without soil.

As a result of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, this year’s Farm Science Review will be exclusively virtual, so you can find out about the latest in farm technology and techniques from the convenience of your home. The show, which is sponsored by CFAES, is free. Sign up at fsr.osu.edu.

If you require an accommodation, such as live captioning or interpretation, to participate in this event, please email fsrinfo@osu.edu.

The Talk on Friday Avenue is an annual panel discussion given by agricultural economists in CFAES. This year it will focus on supply chains in food and agriculture, many of which were tested earlier this year when the nation’s major meat processors closed down temporarily as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, which left many employees ill with COVID-19. Continue reading

Your guide to virtual Farm Science Review

Learning virtually what you need to know at Farm Science Review, Sept. 22-24.

Find a comfortable seat and charge your device.

Farm Science Review is being held online this year because of COVID-19 concerns.

Although the Molly Caren Agricultural Center is closed to the public, you’ll be able to learn the latest agricultural technology and helpful farming techniques from more than 400 exhibitors—all for free on your laptop, tablet, or smartphone.

More than 200 free live-streamed and recorded talks and demos will be available online. You will have to provide your own steakburgers, milkshakes, or other FSR fare, though.

Continue reading

Take some time during Farm Science Review to share the film SILO.

Earlier in the year, I had the opportunity to watch the film SILO during the American Farm Bureau Federation National Meeting.  If you are involved in farming or work in agribusiness this movie is a great one to watch.  Safety around grain bins is one of the areas of focus I have had for Paulding County. Many of our local fire departments have volunteers trained in grain bin rescue and via grants have the equipment to use in the county if the need arises to complete a rescue. With Farm Science Review in a virtual, online format, the opportunity to see the movie is free.  There are specific times but please take time for this great opportunity.

Free screenings of the film SILO will be offered as a part of Farm Science Review 2020. It is a great opportunity for friends and family to spend an evening together watching a movie from the comfort of their own home. A way to start a dialog around safety for families, FFA chapters, or older 4-H members. Thank you for your support in keeping our farm communities safe this harvest season.

Link and flyer to get registered for the event

It’s time for the Hessian Fly-free Date Again

Hessian Fly Free dates across Ohio. Paulding County’s date is September 24

By Andy Michel, Pierce Paul, Kelley Tilmon

The cold temperatures this week reminded us that we are approaching our fly-free date for Ohio. These dates are based on predictions on when most Hessian fly adults would no longer be alive to lay eggs on emerging wheat. Planting winter crops after this date is a good practice to prevent infestations. Areas of Northern Ohio can safely plant wheat after September 22, whereas the dates in southern Ohio extend to October 4 and 5.

The fly-free date can also be used for both cover crops and to manage diseases. A hessian fly can infest certain types of cover crops such as rye and triticale. While we may not worry about yield loss in cover crops, high populations in the winter may provide for infestations in the following spring. For diseases, the biggest advantage and most important benefit of planting after the fly-safe date is a reduction in the fall establishment of Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus (BYDV), Stagonospora blotch, and Septoria leaf spot.

Populations of the aphids that transmit BYDV are usually much lower after the fly-safe date, thus reducing the level of transmission of the disease to the new crop. BYDV tends to be more damaging and causes the greatest yield loss when it becomes established in the fall. For leaf diseases such as Stagonospora and Septoria, planting after the fly-safe date also reduces the risk of fall infections. When Stagonospora- and Septoria-causing fungi overwinter in the leaves, this usually gives both diseases a head-start in the spring, leading to great and earlier damage of the flag leaves before grain-fill is complete, and consequently, greater yield loss if a susceptible cultivar is planted and diseases are not managed with a fungicide.

Labor Day Rainfall Eases Drought

Figure 1: U.S. Drought Monitor for Ohio as reported on Thursday, September 10, 2020

Weather Summary

Summer (June – August) 2020 ranks as the 11th warmest and 29th driest summer on record for the state of Ohio since 1895. Temperatures averaged 1-4°F above average (1981-2010), with 5-10 inches of rainfall across the northwestern half of the state and 10-15 inches across the southeastern half. Particularly dry this summer has been the northwestern counties, a few counties in central and southwest Ohio (e.g., Madison, Pickaway, Ross, Fayette, and Greene), as well as Richland, Ashland, Wayne, and Stark Counties.

Though too late for most crops in the state, recent rainfall is helping to recharge soil moisture. A slow-moving boundary draped across the state on Labor Day brought significant rainfall to much of northern Ohio. Most locations along and north of about I-70 (except NW Ohio) received 2-7” of rain. There was also a confirmed EF0 tornado a few miles east of Delaware with estimated winds to 80 mph and a few reports of large hail across the state. As of Thursday, September 10, 2020, the U.S. Drought Monitor indicates about 19% of Ohio is experiencing abnormally dry to moderate drought conditions, down from about 37% the prior week (Figure 1). For more information on recent climate conditions and impacts, check out the latest Hydro-Climate Assessment from the State Climate Office of Ohio. Continue reading

Surface Application of Manure to Newly Planted Wheat Fields

Manure Application to Wheat

By Glen Arnold, Manure and Nutrient Management Specialist, OSU

Several livestock producers have inquired about applying liquid dairy or swine manure to newly planted wheat fields using a drag hose. The thought process is that the fields are firm (dry), there is very little rain in the nearby forecast, and the moisture in the manure could help with wheat germination and emergence.

The manure nutrients could easily replace the commercial fertilizer normally applied in advance of planting wheat. The application of fall-applied livestock manure to newly planted or growing crops can reduce nutrient losses compared to fall-applied manure without a growing crop.

Both swine and dairy manure can be used to add moisture to newly planted wheat. It’s important that the wheat seeds were properly covered with soil when planted to keep a barrier between the salt and nitrogen in the manure and the germinating wheat seed. It’s also important that livestock producers know their soil phosphorus levels, and the phosphorus in the manure being applied, so we don’t grow soil phosphorus levels beyond what is acceptable. Continue reading

Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2019-20

by: Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, Director, OSU Income Tax Schools, College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, OSU Extension

Ohio cropland varies significantly in its production capabilities and, consequently, cropland values and cash rents vary widely throughout the state. Generally speaking, western Ohio cropland values and cash rents differ from much of eastern Ohio and parts of southern Ohio cropland values and cash rents. The primary factors affecting these values and rates are land productivity and potential crop return, and the variability of those crop returns. Soils and drainage capabilities are the two factors that heavily influence land productivity, crop return, and variability of those crop returns.

Other factors impacting land values and cash rents may include buildings and grain storage, field size and shape, field accessibility, market access, local market prices, field perimeter characteristics and potential for wildlife damage, previous tillage system and crops, tolerant/resistant weed populations, population density, USDA Program Yields, and competition for the cropland in a region. Ultimately, the supply and demand for cropland will determine the value or rental rate for each parcel. Continue reading

Ask the Expert Sessions to Be Held Live During 2020 Farm Science Review

By David Marrison, Jeff Workman & Chris Bruynis

For the first time in its nearly 60 year history, Ohio State’s Farm Science Review scheduled for September 22 -24 will not be held in-person.  Instead, a virtual show will be held and the Review will come to you on your laptop or smartphone this year, and for free.  You can watch live-streamed talks and recorded videos featuring the latest farm equipment and research to pique your curiosity.

Virtual visitors can find out about the show’s offerings by going to fsr.osu.edu and clicking on an image of the show’s site. Within that image, people can click on the various icons to find the schedules for talks and demos they’re most interested in, such as field demonstrations or “Ask the Expert” talks.

Among the live-streamed talks will be Ask the Expert presentations. Viewers will enter the talks through a Zoom meeting link and be able to post their questions in chat boxes. If you miss any, you can check back after the talks to watch the recordings.

The 20 minute “Ask the Expert” presentations at Farm Science Review are one segment of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine comprehensive Extension Education efforts during the three days of the Farm Science Review. Our experts will share science-based recommendations and solutions to the issues people are facing regarding weather impacts, tariffs, veterinarian medicine, and low commodity prices.

Topics for talks at FSR this year include the risks of transmitting COVID-19 to your animals, the prospects of U.S. agricultural exports abroad, increasing profits from small grains by planting double crops, climate trends, managing cash flow on the farm, farm stress, and rental rates on agricultural land.

To access all prerecorded and live-streamed talks at Farm Science Review, sign up on or after Sept. 8 at fsr.osu.edu.

Click here for a PDF copy of the 2020 FSR Ask the Expert full schedule

Join the Paulding County Master Gardener at their Drive Through Plant Sale on Saturday, September 12

Join the Paulding Master Gardener Volunteers at their Fall Drive Through Plant Sale on Saturday, September 12 from 10 AM – 2 PM at the Paulding County Fairgrounds.  We are asking that people enter via the main gate at the fairgrounds. Please bring a box or have your trunk lined with newspapers to set your plants in.  A volunteer will walk with you outside your car to take your order. You will be asked to stay in your car. Items are priced to sell.  See our listing of plants, trees, etc. Quantities are limited so come early to get the best selection.

Reports from National Ag Statistics for July published late June.

Reports from the National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) for July 2020.

July 2020 Milk Production Report Ohio

July 2020 Milk Production Report published on August 20, 2020

Dairy herds in Ohio produced 475 million pounds of milk during July, up 4.4 percent from a year ago, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician of the USDA, NASS, Ohio Field Office. Production per cow in Ohio averaged 1,870 pounds for July, 50 pounds above July 2019. The dairy herd was estimated at 254,000 head for July, up 4,000 head from a year earlier.
Milk production in the 24 major States during July totaled 17.8 billion pounds, up 1.5 percent from July 2019. June revised production, at 17.5 billion pounds, was up 0.8 percent from June 2019. The June revision represented an increase of 59 million pounds or 0.3 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 24 major States averaged 2,016 pounds for July, 19 pounds above July 2019. The number of milk cows on farms in the 24 major States was 8.83 million head, 44,000 head more than July 2019, and 2,000 head more than June 2020.

July 2020 Ohio Agricultural Prices

Ohio July Agricultural Prices published on August 31, 2020

Prices Received by Ohio farmers for the full month of July 2020 are listed in the table in the link provided above.
Some Ohio highlights were: July corn, at $3.47 per bushel, decreased $0.07 from June and decreased $1.12 from last year; July soybeans, at $8.95 per bushel, increased $0.13 from last month and increased $0.30 from last year; July wheat, at $5.17 per bushel, increased $0.10 from June but decreased $0.04 from last year; July milk, at $18.70 per cwt., increased $1.80 from last month and increased $0.30 from last year.

The July Prices Received Index 2011 Base (Agricultural Production), at 87.4, decreased 2.0 percent from June and 4.3 percent from July 2019. At 90.0, the Crop Production Index was down 2.0 percent from last month but up 0.9 percent from the previous year. The Livestock Production Index, at 84.5, decreased 2.5 percent from June, and 9.8 percent from July last year. Producers received higher prices during July for milk, market eggs, potatoes, and corn but lower prices for cattle, broilers, hogs, and oranges. In addition to prices, the indexes are influenced by the volume change of the commodities producers market. In July, there was increased monthly movement for grapes, wheat, hay, and tomatoes and decreased marketing of milk, oranges, cattle, and strawberries.

We Now Turn Our Attention to Autumn Harvest Season

Map of Pacific Ocean

Map of Pacific Ocean

Article from CORN 9-1-2020, Jim Noel, National Weather Service

The cooler than normal blob of water in the eastern Pacific Ocean near the equator tends to push the first autumn freeze later than normal in our region. Therefore, there is no indication of an early freeze in September this year. It appears the first freeze for Ohio will not come until October either on schedule or a bit later than normal.

September looks to have the first half start cooler than normal followed by a return to normal temperatures for the second half of the month.  Precipitation will be normal or slightly above normal for September. Normal rainfall is currently 1-1.5 inches per two weeks dropping to about an inch per two weeks for the second half of September. Even though we expect rainfall at or slightly above normal in September, there is a great deal of uncertainty due to the tropics and where those systems will travel. So you will want to pay attention to later outlooks at https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov

Rainfall for the first half of September will average 0.50-2.00 inches. The heaviest rains will likely surround the state of Ohio in most directions.

16 day precipitation forecast

16 day precipitation outlook

October into part of November looks to resume the above-normal temperatures which should create an extended autumn this year. Rainfall remains highly uncertain but it appears near normal is the most likely outcome for October and November as we have some climate models showing above normal and some below normal rainfall.

The early outlook for winter calls for above-normal temperatures the first half and below normal temperatures second half. Precipitation is likely to become above normal with potential influences from the tropical Pacific Ocean.

Herbicide Residue Considerations for Fall Cover Crop Establishment

Cover Crops in Corn Stalks

Article from CORN Newsletter on September 1, 2020 – By Mark Loux and Alyssa Essman, OSU

Herbicides with a residual that is used in corn and soybeans can affect the establishment of fall-planted cover crops and should be taken into account when planning cover crop practices and selecting species. Soil characteristics and weather also play a role in the persistence of residual herbicides, which can vary by field and year. More information is needed on rotational intervals for many cover crop species, and this information is often not included on herbicide labels. University weed scientists have studied the effect of residual herbicides on some of the most popular cover crop species in order to provide this information to growers. In general, residual herbicides that control grass weeds can hinder the establishment of grass cover crop species. Broadleaf cover crop species are most impacted by group 2 (ALS inhibitors), 5 (PSII inhibitors), 14 (PPO inhibitors), and 27 (HPPD inhibitors) herbicides (Purdue University). Continue reading

Battle for Lake Erie includes debate over manure-based phosphorus concentration

8/31/2020
BY TOM HENRY / THE BLADE

A major agronomic debate is being played out in Columbus now, which has potentially large ramifications for western Lake Erie and goes beyond simply looking at the staggering volumes of liquid and solid excrement produced by northwest Ohio cows, hogs, and chickens.

It focuses on the minutia of agricultural science, right down to the parts per million of phosphorus applied to soil in the form of manure.

One of the many groups raising questions is the Lake Erie Foundation, a consortium of Lake Erie-area business and environmental interests. That group and others, including Lake Erie Waterkeeper, want manure-based phosphorus applications dialed down to roughly the same concentration as commercially made, synthetic fertilizers, which is about 40 to 50 parts per million. Manure has for years been applied on northwest Ohio crop farms at much higher concentrations, usually 150 ppm. Some critics, though, claim the application rate has, in reality, gotten as high as 200 ppm to 250 ppm.

From information gathered in a public records request, the foundation believes the state of Ohio has rejected a recommendation from an independent consultant, McKinsey & Co., to promote 50 ppm as a limit for manure, even though Dorothy Pelanda, Ohio Department of Agriculture director, showed support for that in 2019. The firm was paid $1.5 million to provide advice to the DeWine administration for its H2Ohio program, which aims to improve water quality statewide through better farming techniques, more and improved wetlands, better pipelines, and other measures. Continue reading

Tar Spot – What is it?

Figure 2. Tar spot symptoms on leaves both on the lower and the upper canopy. (Photo Credit: Darcy Telenko)

While I have been out in Paulding county scouting in the last week, I have not noticed any tar spot in our cornfields as of yet.  It could be there though as I am not walking in every field. I wanted producers to take note of what Tar Spot looks like and some monitoring from our neighbors in Indiana and information from a previous CORN New Article.  Continue reading

Soil Residual Herbicides And Establishment Of Cover Crops In The Fall

Crimson clover stands in 2019 cover crop trials. (Photo Credit: Connor Hodgkiss)

By Marcelo Zimmer and Bill Johnson, Purdue Extension

Indiana growers have shown increased interest in utilizing cover crops in our corn and soybean production systems over the last decade.  Concurrently, there has also been increased utilization of soil residual herbicides to help manage herbicide-resistant weeds such as marestail (horseweed), waterhemp, and giant ragweed in our corn and soybean production systems.  Soil residual herbicides can remain active in the soil for a period of weeks to months after application.  The length of time a residual herbicide remains biologically active in the soil is influenced by soil texture, soil pH, organic matter, rainfall, and temperature.  Since these factors will vary from field to field, definitive time intervals of residual herbicide activity can be difficult to predict.

The use of residual herbicides in our corn and soybean production systems may interfere with the establishment of fall-seeded cover crops under certain conditions.  Unfortunately, many of the species being used for cover crops were not evaluated for herbicide carryover when field research was conducted to support EPA’s approved herbicide labels.  As a result, data are lacking regarding rotational intervals of many residual herbicides for the establishment of many cover crop species. Continue reading

Cover Crop Field Day in NW Ohio, SE Michigan (Hillsdale Conservation District Cover Crop Field Day)

Join Hillsdale Conservation District on Thursday, September 3 for their 2020 Cover Crop Field Day hosted by Person Farms (19233 County Rd. 5.50, Montpelier, OH 43543; .5 mile South of W. Territorial Rd.). Please note, registration is required for entry. You may RSVP with names and numbers of guests to Allison Grimm at 517-320-3245; Cody Birdsell at 517-260-1276; or e-mail hillsdalecd@macd.org.

Registration and dinner will be from 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. and the program will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a cover crop test plot tour followed by a cover crop trial and error open discussion. Credits offered include 2 MI RUP credits and CCA credits (pending approval).

Farm Bill Reminders and Deadlines

Two Quick reminders and deadlines:

  • Producers who wish to update their FSA farm yield have until September 30, 2020, to do so. A tool to determine if a producer might want to update their PLC yields is available at https://aede.osu.edu/research/osu-farm-management/2018-farm-bill/arcplc-decision-aid-tools
  • Enrollment and Election for the 2021 program year will start October 1, 2020, and end March 15, 2021. OSU Decision aides will be updated once we have annual trend yield values for historical ARC-CO yields matching the program year 2021.

From the Farm Management Front – Update on County Yield Estimates for 2019 ARC/PLC Programs

On the dark art of software estimation | TechCrunchFrom Sarah Noggle with additional information from Ben Brown.

Sarah’s information: Yes, you read that correctly, 2019 estimates. As many of you know and are understanding the 2018 Farm Bill program through USDA (yes – it’s confusing sometimes when you are working with it daily), one will remember that payments will be made the calendar year after the program selection in late October. 

I have had a few requests and asks about what will my 2019 Farm Bill payments look like if I choose ARC-CO or PLC for Paulding County.  While this information will officially come from the FSA office later in the calendar year in 2020 (usually in October), I have attached some information on the ESTIMATES. Remember these payments are made on your BASE acres, not on the acres you planted in 2019. 

  • Paulding County – ARC-CO Wheat Base Acres $33.38
  • Paulding County – ARC-CO Corn Base Acres $0
  • Paulding County – ARC-CO Soybean Base Acres $0
  • Paulding County PLC Wheat Base Acres $36.66
  • Paulding County PLC Corn Base Acres $11.22
  • Paulding County PLC Soybean Base Acres $0

 Also, remember due to 2019 prevent plant acres in Paulding County and the surrounding counties, some producers choose the ARC-IC program.  The ARC-IC payments will be made comparing your own farm-level data and requires you to submit extra information to the FSA office. Ben Brown has created the estimates for corn, soybean, and wheat base acres for all the counties across the state.  His information will allow producers to have an idea of autumn working capital, debt repayment, and information to purchase inputs with an early season discount.  Continue reading